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Encyclopedia > Five Ks
Part of a Personal|series]] on
Sikh practices

Personal

Five Banis . Five Ks
Five Evils
Five Virtues
Simran . Sewa
Three pillars
The practice of the Sikh way of life has been laid out by the Gurus in simple, precise and practical manner. ... A Sikh is required by the Sikh Gurus to live a disciplined life by doing pure and righteous deeds and actions. ... FIVE EVILS or five thieves or pancadokh or panj vikar as they are referred to in Sikh Scripture, the Guru Granth Sahib, are, according to Sikhism, the five major weaknesses of the human personality at variance with its spiritual essence. ... For Sikhs, the final goal of life is to reunite or merge with God (Mukti). ... The term Simran refers to the vocal repetition or recital of the God Names - Naam or of the Holy Text from the Two Granths of the Sikhs - the Sri Guru Granth Sahib and the Dasam Granth. ... SEWA is the Self-Employed Womens Association of India, a trade union founded in 1972 after a split in the Textile Labour Association. ... The Three Pillars of Sikhism Guru Nanak formalised the three important pillars of Sikhism: 1. ...

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The Five Ks, or panj kakaar/kakke, are five items of faith that baptised Khalsa Sikhs wear at all times at the command of the tenth Sikh Guru, Guru Gobind Singh who so ordered at the Baisakhi Amrit Sanchar in 1699. The Five Ks are not merely symbols but articles of faith which collectively form the external visible symbols to identify and clearly and outwardly advertise and display one's commitment. Khalsa (Punjabi: , literally Pure) refers to the collective body of all baptized Sikhs. ... Religions Sikhism Scriptures Guru Granth Sahib Languages English, Punjabi] A Sikh (English: or ; Punjabi: , , IPA: ) is an adherent to Sikhism. ... For other uses, see Guru (disambiguation). ... Guru Gobind Singh (Punjabi: ) (22 December 1666 – 7 October 1708) He was born in Patna in India in 1666 and became the tenth Guru of the Sikhs on 11 November 1675, succeeding his father, Guru Tegh Bahadur who was killed by Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb. ... Traditional fervour and gaiety mark the celebrations of Baisakhi, which stands for the dawn of a new year in north India. ... The Amrit Sanskar Ceremony Amrit Sanskar or Amrit Sanchar or the Amrit ceremony is the Sikh ceremony of initiation or baptism. ... Events January 26 - Treaty of Karlowitz signed March 30 - the tenth Sikh Master, Guru Gobind Singh created the Khalsa. ...


The Khalsa Sikhs who don all the Five Ks are known as Amritdhari (as they have participated in the Amrit Sanchar ceremony), while the Sikhs who have not donned all the Five Ks are known as Sahajdhari. Khalsa (Punjabi: , literally Pure) refers to the collective body of all baptized Sikhs. ... Religions Sikhism Scriptures Guru Granth Sahib Languages English, Punjabi] A Sikh (English: or ; Punjabi: , , IPA: ) is an adherent to Sikhism. ... The Amrit Sanskar Ceremony Amrit Sanskar or Amrit Sanchar or the Amrit ceremony is the Sikh ceremony of initiation or baptism. ... Sahajdhari (meaning: A non-baptized Sikh and slow-adopter), is a slow-adopter gradualist Sikh who believes in all the tenants of Sikhism and the teaching of the Sikh Gurus but has not put all of them into practice by becoming a baptized full Sikh - a Khalsa. ...

Contents

The five items

Kanga, Kara and Kirpan - three of the five Ks
Kanga, Kara and Kirpan - three of the five Ks

{{quotation|ਕਛਕੜਾਕਿਰਪਾਨਕੰਘਾਕੇਸਕੀਇਹਪੰਜਕਕਾਰੀਰਹ

Kacha (Special designed undergarment), Kara (iron bangle), Kirpan (strapped sword), Kanga (wooden comb) & Kesh (uncut hair) – A person who wears all these Five Kakaars (Articles of Faith) should be considered a Sikh.|([[Rehitnaama Bhai Chaupa Singh)}}]] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1616 KB) 3 Kakkars - Kara, kanga and kirpan I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1616 KB) 3 Kakkars - Kara, kanga and kirpan I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ...

  1. Kesh Uncut hair on any part of the body for men and women is mandatory and can be considered the most important "K"
  2. Kangha Wooden comb for hygiene and maintenance of the Kesh.
  3. Kara Iron bracelet: - Physical reminder that a Sikh is bound to the Guru.
  4. Kachera Specially designed cotton underwear:- Naturally comfortable and dignified attire reflective of modesty and high moral character.
  5. Kirpan Strapped sword: - Worn to defend one's faith and protect the weak, reminding one of his or her duty as a Khalsa

ਜੋ ਪਗ ਨੂੰ ਬਾਸੀ ਰਖੇ ਸੋ ਤਨਖਾਹੀਆ। ਇਸ ਲਈ ਹਰ ਗੁਰੂ ਕੇ ਸਿੱਖ ਲਈ ਲਾਜ਼ਮੀ ਹੈ ਕ ਉਹ ਰੋਜ਼ ਦਸਤਾਰ ਸਜਾਵੇ।

One who does not tie a fresh turban is liable for penalty. For this reason it is mandatory for every Sikh of the Guru to tie a turban everyday. Kesh - Uncut hair is one of the five articles of faith for the Sikhs The Sikhs were commanded by Guru Gobind Singh at the Baisakhi Amrit Sanchar in 1699 to wear long uncut hair, called Kesh, at all times. ... The Five Ks, or panj kakaar, are five items that baptised Khalsa Sikhs wear at all times at the command of the tenth Sikh Guru, Guru Gobind Singh. ... Kara may refer to: Kara (Kaushambi), a town in Kaushambi near Allahabad Kara (Togo), a city in northern Togo Kara (Norse mythology), a character in Norse mythology Kara class cruiser, a Soviet Cold War warship design Kara (Sikhism), a type of bracelet worn in South Asia, and a requirement to... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Typical Kirpan worn by modern Sikhs The Kirpan (IPA: ) (Punjabi: ) is a ceremonial sword or dagger worn by all baptised Sikhs. ...

(Rehitnama Bhai Chaupa Singh jee)

A Sikh never cuts or trims any hair (Kesh), to indicate the perfection of God's creation. The comb keeps the hair tidy, a symbol of not just accepting what God has given, but also an injunction to maintain it with grace. The Guru said hair should be allowed to grow naturally. For men, this includes not shaving. At the time of Guru Gobind Singh, some holy men let their hair become tangled and dirty. The Guru said that this was not right. Hair should be allowed to grow but it should be kept clean and combed at least twice a day. Kesh - Uncut hair is one of the five articles of faith for the Sikhs The Sikhs were commanded by Guru Gobind Singh at the Baisakhi Amrit Sanchar in 1699 to wear long uncut hair, called Kesh, at all times. ...


A Dastaar is a turban worn to protect the Kesh (unshorn hair) and guard the Dasam Duaar (the Tenth Gate), a spiritual opening at the top of the head. The turban is a spiritual crown, which is a constant reminder to the Sikh that he or she is sitting on the throne of consciousness and is committed to living according to Sikh principles. It is the identity of a Sikh. Guru Gobind Singh jee told His Sikhs: “Khaalsa mero roop hai kaas. Khaalsa mai ho karo nivaas... The Khalsa is my image. Within the Khalsa I reside.” Wearing a turban declares sovereignty, dedication, self-respect, courage and piety....... Kesh - Uncut hair is one of the five articles of faith for the Sikhs The Sikhs were commanded by Guru Gobind Singh at the Baisakhi Amrit Sanchar in 1699 to wear long uncut hair, called Kesh, at all times. ...


Kangha

Main article: Kanga (Sikhism)
Kangha - one of the five articles of faith for the Sikhs
Kangha - one of the five articles of faith for the Sikhs

ਕੰਘਾ ਦੋਨਉਂ ਵਕਤ ਕਰ, ਪਾਗ ਚੁਨਹਿ ਕਰ ਬਾਂਧਈ ॥

Comb the hair twice a day, covering it with turban that is to be tied from fresh. Kanga - one of the five articles of faith for the Sikhs The Sikhs were commanded by Guru Gobind Singh at the Baisakhi Amrit Sanchar in 1699 to wear a small comb called a Kanga at all times. ...

Tankhanama Bhai Nand Lal Singh

A Kangha is a small wooden comb that Sikhs use twice a day. It should be worn in the hair, and only the hair, at all times. Combs help to clean hair and remove tangles from it, as well as being a symbol of cleanliness to the Sikhs. Combing their hair reminds them that their lives should be tidy and organized, too. The Sikhs were commanded by Guru Gobind Singh to wear a small comb called the Kangha at all times.


Kachera

Main article: Kaccha
Kacha - one of the five articles of faith for the Sikhs
Kacha - one of the five articles of faith for the Sikhs

ਸੀਲ ਜਤ ਕੀ ਕਛ ਪਹਿਰਿ ਪਕਿੜਓ ਹਿਥਆਰਾ ॥

The sign of true chastity is the Kachhera, you must wear this and hold weapons in hand. Kaccha - one of the five articles of faith for the Sikhs Kachera/Kaccha: Undershorts/undergarment which looks like boxer shorts. ...

Bhai Gurdas, Var. 41, pauri 15

The Kacha is the Guru's gift and it reminds the Sikhs of the Guru's message regarding the control of the Five Evils, especially lust. Further, this garment allows the Sikh soldier to operate in combat freely and without any hindrance or restriction. It serves its purpose efficiently and effectively and is easy to fabricate, maintain, wash and carry compared to other under-garments of the day, like the dhoti, etc.


Kirpan

Main article: Kirpan
Typical Kirpan worn by modern Sikhs
Typical Kirpan worn by modern Sikhs

ਸ਼ਸਤਰ ਹੀਨ ਕਬਹੂ ਨਹਿ ਹੋਈ, ਰਿਹਤਵੰਤ ਖਾਲਸਾ ਸੋਈ ॥

Those who never depart his/her arms, they are the Khalsa with excellent rehats. Typical Kirpan worn by modern Sikhs The Kirpan (IPA: ) (Punjabi: ) is a ceremonial sword or dagger worn by all baptised Sikhs. ...

Rehatnama Bhai Desa Singh

Kirpan comes from the word 'KIRPA' and 'AAN'.... Kirpa means an act of kindness or a favour; 'aan' means honour, respect, and self-respect. It is an instrument which adds to self-respect and self-defence. Thus for Sikhs, Kirpan is the symbol of power and freedom of spirit. All baptised Sikhs should wear a short form of Kirpan (approx. 6" to 9" long) on their body. To call it a dagger or knife is rather insulting to this article of faith, which functions quite differently from the other two. The blade should be made of iron. Typical Kirpan worn by modern Sikhs The Kirpan (IPA: ) (Punjabi: ) is a ceremonial sword or dagger worn by all baptised Sikhs. ... Bold text This article is about the weapon. ... This article is about the tool. ... General Name, symbol, number iron, Fe, 26 Chemical series transition metals Group, period, block 8, 4, d Appearance lustrous metallic with a grayish tinge Standard atomic weight 55. ...


A Sikh should never use the Kirpan in anger or for a malicious attack. However, a Sikh may use it in self-defence or to protect a person in need. Some Sikhs choose to learn the art of Gatka. This is a martial art devised by the Sikh Gurus that uses circular movements to effectively swing a sword. Typical Kirpan worn by modern Sikhs The Kirpan (IPA: ) (Punjabi: ) is a ceremonial sword or dagger worn by all baptised Sikhs. ... Gatka (Punjabi: , ) is a traditional Sikh martial art. ... Sikhism was established by ten Gurus, teachers or masters, over the period 1469 to 1708. ... Swiss longsword, 15th or 16th century Look up Sword in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


See also

The Amrit Sanskar Ceremony Amrit Sanskar or Amrit Sanchar or the Amrit ceremony is the Sikh ceremony of initiation or baptism. ... Vaisakhi (Punjabi: , , also known as Baisakhi) is an ancient harvest festival in Punjab, which also marks beginning of a new solar year, and new harvest season. ... Khalsa (Punjabi: , literally Pure) refers to the collective body of all baptized Sikhs. ... Sahajdhari (meaning: A non-baptized Sikh and slow-adopter), is a slow-adopter gradualist Sikh who believes in all the tenants of Sikhism and the teaching of the Sikh Gurus but has not put all of them into practice by becoming a baptized full Sikh - a Khalsa. ...

External links

  • The Five Sikh Symbols - SikhismGuide.org
  • The Sikh Symbols - eBook
  • The Sikh Bangle (Karra) - eBook
Image File history File links Sikh emblem. ... This list is of topics related to Sikhs and Sikhism. ... Sikhism (IPA: or ; Punjabi: , , IPA: ), founded on the teachings of Guru Nanak Dev and nine successive gurus in fifteenth century Northern India, is the fifth-largest religion in the world. ... Image File history File links Sikh emblem. ... Sikhism was established by ten Gurus, teachers or masters, over the period 1469 to 1708. ... Guru Nanak Dev[1] (Punjabi: , ) (Born in Nankana Sahib, Punjab, (now Pakistan) on 15th April 1469 – 7 May 1539, Kartarpur, Punjab, India), was the founder of Sikhism, and the first of the eleven Sikh Gurus. ... Period in office   1539 - 1552 Predecessor   Guru Nanak Dev Founder of Sikhism Successor   Amar Das 3nd of the Eleven Gurus of Sikhism Religious career Ordination   07 September 1539 Previous post   Guru Personal Date of birth   31 March 1504 Place of birth   Muktsar, Punjab, (now India) Date of death   March 28... Guru Amar Das Guru Amar Das (Punjabi: ) (Born in Amritsar, Punjab, India on 5 May 1479 – 14 May 1574 Amritsar, Punjab, India) was the third of the Ten Gurus of Sikhism, and he became Guru on 26 March 1552 following in the footsteps of Guru Angad Dev, who died 29... Sri Guru Ram Das Ji (Punjabi: ਸ੍ਰੀ ਗੁਰੂ ਰਾਮ ਦਾਸ ਜੀ) (24 September 1534 – 1 September 1581) was the fourth of the Ten Gurus of Sikhism and became Guru on 30 August 1574 following in the footsteps of Guru Amar Das. ... Guru Arjan, right, dictating the Adi Granth to Bhai Gurdas. ... Portrait of Guru Har Gobind Guru Har Gobind (Punjabi: ) also Sacha Padshah (ਸੱਚਾ ਪਾਦਸ਼ਾਹ True King) (1595–1644) was the sixth of the Ten Gurus of Sikhism and became Guru on 25 May 1606 following in the footsteps of his father Guru Arjan Dev. ... Guru Har Rai ji. ... Guru Har Krishan (Punjabi: ) (Born in Rupnagar, Punjab, India on 7 July 1656 as – 30 March 1664, Delhi, India) was the eighth of the Ten Gurus of Sikhism, and he became Guru on 7 October 1661 following in the footsteps of his father, Guru Har Rai. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Guru Gobind Singh (Punjabi: ) (22 December 1666 – 7 October 1708) He was born in Patna in India in 1666 and became the tenth Guru of the Sikhs on 11 November 1675, succeeding his father, Guru Tegh Bahadur who was killed by Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb. ... The Shri Guru Granth Sahib (Punjabi: , ) is the 11th Guru of Sikhism, the holy book of Sikhism, which is revered as a living Guru by the Sikhs. ... Sikh Bhagats refers to the Saints and holy men of various faiths whose teachings are included in the Sikh holy book the Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji. ... The Sikh religious philosophy is covered in great detail in the Sri Guru Granth Sahib, the Sikh holy text. ... // There is only one God who has infinite qualities and names. ... The Sikhs must believe in the following values: Equality: All humans are equal before God – No discrimination is allowed on the basis of caste, race, sex, creed, origin, color, education, status, wealth, etc. ... There are a number of religious prohibitions in Sikhism and by the SGPC: Cutting Hair: Cutting hair is strictly forbidden in Sikhism. ... Naam: Or Naam Japo. ... The Golden Temple is the most important sacred shrine for Sikhs Sikhism comes from the word Sikh, which means a strong and able disciple. ... The Ardās (Punjabi: ) are the Sikh daily prayers. ... The Amrit Sanskar Ceremony Amrit Sanskar or Amrit Sanchar or the Amrit ceremony is the Sikh ceremony of initiation or baptism. ... Chardi Kala is an important expression used in Sikhism for a mind frame that a Sikh has to accept and practise. ... Dasvand means to donate 10% percent of ones harvest to the Gurdwara. ... Kirat Karō is one of three primary pillars of Sikhism. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the Sufi practice of Langar, see Langar (Sufism). ... Nām Japō (Punjabi: ), refers to the meditation, vocal singing of Hymns from the Sri Guru Granth Sahib or of the various Names of God, specially the chanting of the word Waheguru, which means Wonderful Lord. ... The term Simran refers to the vocal repetition or recital of the God Names - Naam or of the Holy Text from the Two Granths of the Sikhs - the Sri Guru Granth Sahib and the Dasam Granth. ... The Three Pillars of Sikhism Guru Nanak formalised the three important pillars of Sikhism: 1. ... In Sikhism Vaṇḍ Chakkō (Punjabi: ) is a technique and method which means share it as you consume it. ... The Shri Guru Granth Sahib (Punjabi: , ) is the 11th Guru of Sikhism, the holy book of Sikhism, which is revered as a living Guru by the Sikhs. ... Guru Granth Sahib (Granth is Punjabi for book, Sahib is Hindi meaning master, from Arabic, meaning companion, friend, owner, or master) or Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji or SGGS for short, is more than a holy book of the Sikhs. ... The Dasam Granth (Punjabi: , ) is a scripture of Sikhism, containing texts composed by 10th Sikh Guru, Guru Gobind Singh and his assembly of scholars. ... The Sarbloh Granth (Punjabi: , ) is a collection of the tenth masters writings that recites the story of gods and demons. ... Bani is the term used by Sikhs to refer to various sections of the Holy Text that appears in their several Holy Books. ... Chaupai is the short name for the Sikh prayer or Gurbani whose full name is Kabiobach Bainti Chaupai. ... Jaap Sahib is the morning prayer of the Sikhs. ... Japji Sahib consists of the Mool Mantra as the beginning followed by 38 hymns and a final Salok at the end of this composition. ... Illuminated Adi Granth folio with nisan (Mool Mantar) of Guru Gobind Singh. ... Evening prayer of the Sikhs. ... Sukhmani Sahib is the name given to the set of hymns divided into 24 sections which appear in the Sri Guru Granth Sahib, the Sikh Holy Scriptures on page 262. ... This is a short hymn of 10 stanzas. ... The history of Sikhism is closely associated with the history of Punjab, the socio-political situation in medieval India, and the social structures and philosophies of Hinduism and Islam. ... Stylised Ek Onkar Simple Ek Onkar Ek Onkar (also , , Ä’k ÅŒaá¹…kār, Ek Omkar, Ik Onkar and other variants) means one God and is a central tenet of Sikh religious philosophy. ... The Harimandir Sahib. ... For the Golden Pavilion Temple in Kyoto, Japan, see Kinkaku-ji. ... Khalsa (Punjabi: , literally Pure) refers to the collective body of all baptized Sikhs. ... The Khanda Sikh Khanda on Stamp designed by Stacey Zabolotney Issued By Canada Post in November 2000 . ... This section of Sikh Names and the Sikh Names List is material copyright of www. ... Satguru or Sadguru means true guru (Sanskrit सदगुरू sat=true), literally: true teacher. ... Waheguru (Punjabi: , or , ) means The Wonderful Lord in the Punjabi language. ... Sheikh Farid (Farid-ul-Din Masaud Shakar Ganj) c. ... Kabir (कबीर) (1440 - Indian Mystic who preached an ideal of seeing all of humanity as one. ... The first known use of the word Punjab is in the book Tarikh-e-Sher Shah (1580), which mentions the construction of a fort by Sher Khan of Punjab. The name is mentioned again in Ain-e-Akbari (part 1), written by Abul Fazal, who also mentions that the territory... For other uses, see Sardar (disambiguation). ... The word Takhat literally means seat of power or throne of authority and refers to one of the five bodies of authority for the Sikhs. ... Dastar Corp. ... Image File history File links Sikh emblem. ... Image File history File links Sikh emblem. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Five Evils - SikhiWiki, free Sikh encyclopedia. (2562 words)
FIVE EVILS or five thieves or pancadokh or panj vikar as they are referred to in Sikh Scripture, the Guru Granth Sahib, are, according to Sikhism, the five major weaknesses of the human personality at variance with its spiritual essence.
Often the five evils are referred to as 'the five' (panch) or 'al1 the five' (sare panch).
When only two of the five are mentioned, the pair consists either of kam and krodh, or of moh and guman, or of lobh and moh; when a group of four out of the five evils is cited, it usually consists of the first four, kam, krodh, lobh and moh.
Five Ks, the five symbols of the Sikh Faith... (942 words)
Five Ks, the five symbols of the Sikh Faith...
The five sacred Sikh symbols are commonly known as Panj Kakars or the 'Five Ks'.
The five sacred Sikh symbols prescribed by Guru Gobind Singh are commonly known as Panj Kakars or the 'Five Ks' because they start with letter K representing Kakka in the Punjabi language.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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