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Encyclopedia > Fitzhugh Lee
Fitzhugh Lee in the Civil War
Fitzhugh Lee in the Civil War

Fitzhugh Lee (November 19, 1835April 18, 1905), nephew of Robert E. Lee, was a Confederate cavalry general in the American Civil War, Governor of Virginia, diplomat, and U.S. Army general in the Spanish-American War. 1860s photo File links The following pages link to this file: Fitzhugh Lee Categories: Public domain images | U.S. history images ... 1860s photo File links The following pages link to this file: Fitzhugh Lee Categories: Public domain images | U.S. history images ... November 19 is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... | Come and take it, slogan of the Texas Revolution 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... April 18 is the 108th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (109th in leap years). ... 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Robert E. Lee, 1863 Portrait by Julian Vannerson Robert Edward Lee (January 19, 1807 – October 12, 1870) was a career army officer and the most successful general of the Confederate forces during the American Civil War. ... Some Confederate soldiers The Confederate States Army (CSA) was formed in February 1861 to defend the Confederate States of America, which had itself been formed that same year when seven southern states seceded from the United States (with four more to follow). ... Kircholm, a 1925 painting by Wojciech Kossak. ... A General is an officer of high military rank. ... Combatants United States of America Union Confederate States of America Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties Killed in action: 110,000 Total dead: 360,000 Wounded: 275,200 Killed in action: 94,000 Total dead: 258,000... Tim Kaine, the current Governor The Governor of Virginia serves as the chief executive of the Commonwealth of Virginia for a four-year term. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ...


Lee was born at "Clermont," in Fairfax County, Virginia. He was the grandson of "Light Horse Harry" Lee, and the nephew of Robert E. Lee. His father, Sydney Smith Lee, was a fleet captain under Commodore Perry in Japanese waters and rose to the rank of Commodore; his mother was a granddaughter of George Mason. Graduating from the U.S. Military Academy in 1856, he was commissioned a second lieutenant in the 2nd U.S. Cavalry, which was commanded by Colonel Albert Sidney Johnston, and in which his uncle, Robert E. Lee, was lieutenant colonel. As a cavalry subaltern, he distinguished himself by his gallant conduct in actions against the Comanches in Texas, and was severely wounded in a fight in Nescutunga, Texas, in 1859. In May of 1860, he was appointed instructor of cavalry at West Point, but resigned his commission upon the secession of Virginia. Official website: http://www. ... Henry Lee III (January 29, 1756 - March 25, 1818), American general, called Light Horse Harry, was born near Dumfries, Virginia. ... Robert E. Lee, 1863 Portrait by Julian Vannerson Robert Edward Lee (January 19, 1807 – October 12, 1870) was a career army officer and the most successful general of the Confederate forces during the American Civil War. ... Matthew Calbraith Perry (April 10, 1794 - March 4, 1858) was the Commodore of the U.S. Navy who forced the opening of Japan to the West with the Convention of Kanagawa in 1854, under the threat of military force. ... Commodore is a military rank used in some navies for officers whose position exceeds that of a Captain, but is less than that of a flag officer. ... George Mason For other uses, see George Mason (disambiguation). ... Alternate meanings: West Point (disambiguation). ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Second Lieutenant is the lowest commissioned rank in many armed forces. ... Colonel is a military rank of a commissioned officer, with the corresponding ranks existing in nearly every country in the world. ... Albert Sidney Johnston Albert Sidney Johnston (February 2, 1803 – April 6, 1862) was a career U.S. Army officer and a Confederate general during the American Civil War. ... Robert E. Lee, 1863 Portrait by Julian Vannerson Robert Edward Lee (January 19, 1807 – October 12, 1870) was a career army officer and the most successful general of the Confederate forces during the American Civil War. ... In the U.S. Army, Air Force and Marine Corps, a lieutenant colonel is a commissioned officer superior to a major and inferior to a colonel. ... Kircholm, a 1925 painting by Wojciech Kossak. ... Comanche territory. ... Official language(s) See: Languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 268,581 sq. ... 1859 (MDCCCLIX) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... West Point redirects here. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ...


Lee was at once employed in the organization of the forces of the South, and served at first as a staff officer to General Richard S. Ewell, and afterwards, from September 1861, as lieutenant colonel, and from April 1862 as colonel of the 1st Virginia Cavalry, based on J.E.B. Stuart's recommendation on July 25, 1862. He served under that general throughout the Virginia campaigns of 1862 and 1863, becoming major general on September 3, 1863. He conducted the cavalry action of Kelly's Ford (March 17, 1863) with skill and success. In the Wilderness and Petersburg campaigns, he was constantly employed as a divisional commander under Stuart, and, after Stuart's death, under General Wade Hampton. Southern United States. ... Richard S. Ewell Richard Stoddert Ewell (February 8, 1817 – January 25, 1872) was a career U.S. Army officer and a Confederate general during the American Civil War. ... James Ewell Brown Stuart (February 6, 1833 – May 12, 1864) was an American soldier from Virginia and a Confederate Army general during the American Civil War. ... July 25 is the 206th day (207th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 159 days remaining. ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... September 3 is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years). ... 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar). ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders William W. Averell Fitzhugh Lee Strength 3,000 total (US and CS) 3,000 total (US and CS) Casualties 200 total (US and CS) 200 total (US and CS) The Battle of Kellys Ford, also known as the Battle... March 17 is the 76th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (77th in Leap years). ... 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar). ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Ulysses S. Grant George G. Meade Robert E. Lee Strength 101,895 soldiers 61,025 soldiers Casualties 18,400 11,400 The Battle of the Wilderness was the first battle of Lieut. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Ulysses S. Grant Robert E. Lee Strength 67,000 – 125,000 average of 52,000 Casualties 53,386 ~32,000 The Richmond-Petersburg Campaign was a series of battles around Petersburg, Virginia, fought from June 15, 1864, to March 25... Symbol of the Polish 1st Legions Infantry Division in NATO code A division is a large military unit or formation usually consisting of around ten to fifteen thousand soldiers. ... There were three men in American history -- grandfather, father, and son -- called Wade Hampton: Wade Hampton (1754—1835), captain in the War of Independence and brigadier-general in the War of 1812; Wade Hampton (1791—1858), one of the wealthiest planters in the South; and Wade Hampton (1818—1902), Confederate...


Lee took part in Jubal A. Early's campaign against Philip Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley, and at Winchester (September 19, 1864) three horses were shot under him and he was severely wounded. When General Hampton was sent to assist General Joseph E. Johnston in North Carolina, the command of the whole of General Lee's cavalry devolved upon Fitzhugh Lee on March 29, 1865, but the surrender at Appomattox followed quickly upon the opening of the campaign. Fitzhugh Lee himself led the last charge of the Confederates on April 9 that year at Farmville, Virginia. Jubal Anderson Early (November 3, 1816 – March 2, 1894) was a lawyer and Confederate general in the American Civil War. ... Philip Sheridan Philip Henry Sheridan (March 6, 1831 – August 5, 1888) was a career U.S. Army officer and one of the great generals in the American Civil War. ... Canoeing on the Shenandoah River near Winchester, VA. The Shenandoah Valley region of western Virginia, from Winchester to Staunton, is bounded by the Blue Ridge mountains to the East and the Allegheny mountains to the West. ... The Battle of Opequon, also known as the Third Battle of Winchester, was a decisive victory for the Union army during the Valley Campaigns of 1864 in the American Civil War. ... September 19 is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years). ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Joseph E. Johnston Joseph Eggleston Johnston (February 3, 1807 – March 21, 1891) was a career U.S. Army officer and one of the most senior generals in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq. ... March 29 is the 88th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (89th in Leap years). ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... Battle of Appomattox Courthouse Conflict American Civil War Date April 9, 1865 Place Appomattox Court House, Virginia Result Union victory; surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia The Battle of Appomattox Courthouse was the final engagement of Robert E. Lees Army of Northern Virginia before surrendering to Ulysses S... April 9 is the 99th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (100th in leap years). ... Farmville is a town located in Virginia. ...

Governor Fitzhugh Lee
Governor Fitzhugh Lee

After the war, Lee devoted himself to farming in Stafford County, Virginia, and was conspicuous in his efforts to reconcile the Southern people to the issue of the war, which he regarded as a final settlement of the questions at issue. In 1875, he attended the Battle of Bunker Hill centennial at Boston and delivered a remarkable address. In 1885, he was a member of the board of visitors of West Point, and from 1886 to 1890 was governor of Virginia. 1880s photo File links The following pages link to this file: Fitzhugh Lee Categories: Public domain images | U.S. history images ... 1880s photo File links The following pages link to this file: Fitzhugh Lee Categories: Public domain images | U.S. history images ... Stafford County is a county located in the state of Virginia. ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Combatants Province of Massachusetts Bay Kingdom of Great Britain Commanders Israel Putnam William Prescott Joseph Warren {Declined command} William Howe Robert Pigot Henry Clinton Strength 1,500 2,600 Casualties 140 dead 271 wounded 30 captured {20 POWs Died} 226 dead 828 wounded Bunker Hill was a battle of the... A centennial is a 100-year anniversary of an event, or the celebrations pertaining thereto. ... Boston is a town and small port c. ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) is a common year starting on Friday (click on link to calendar) // Events January 18 - Modern field hockey is born with the formation of The Hockey Association in England. ... 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar). ...


In April 1896, he was appointed consul-general at Havana by President Grover Cleveland, with duties of a diplomatic and military character added to the usual consular business. In this post (in which he was retained by President William McKinley until 1898) he was from the first called upon to deal with a situation of great difficulty, which culminated with the destruction of the warship USS Maine. Upon the declaration of war between Spain and the United States, he re-entered the army. He was one of the three ex-Confederate general officers who were made major generals of United States Volunteers. Fitzhugh Lee commanded the VII Army Corps, but took no part in the actual operations in Cuba. He was military governor of Havana and Pinar del Rio in 1899, subsequently commanded the Department of the Missouri, and retired as a brigadier general, U.S. Army in 1901. Lee was an early leader of the committee for the Jamestown Exposition, which was held at Sewell's Point on Hampton Roads in 1907. 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Aerial view of Havana Havana (Spanish in full: San Cristóbal de La Habana, usually shortened to just La Habana; UN/LOCODE: CU HAV) is the capital of Cuba and, with a population of 2. ... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the 22nd (1885–1889) and 24th (1893–1897) President of the United States, and the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms. ... William McKinley (January 29, 1843 – September 14, 1901) was the 25th President of the United States. ... 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... USS Maine (ACR-1), the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for the state of Maine, was a 6682-ton second-class pre-dreadnought battleship originally designated as Armored Cruiser #1. ... Pinar del Río is a city in Cuba. ... 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Official language(s) none, English most common Capital Largest city Jefferson City Kansas City Area  - Total   - Width   - Length    - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 21st 69,709 sq mi  180,693 km² 240 miles  385 km 300 miles  480 km 1. ... 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Jamestown Exposition was one of the many worlds fairs and expositions that were popular in the United States early part of the 20th century. ... Hampton Roads, Virginia 1858 Sewells Point is a peninsula of land in the independent city of Norfolk, Virginia in the United States, located at the mouth of the salt-water port of Hampton Roads. ... Hampton Roads, from state map of pre-civil war Virginia circa 1858 Hampton Roads is the name of both a body of water and the land areas which surround it in southeastern Virginia in the United States. ... 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


He died in Washington, D.C., and is buried in Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Virginia. Nickname: the District Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Official website: http://www. ... A view of Hollywood Cemetery and Presidents Circle Hollywood Cemetery is a large, sprawling cemetery in Richmond, Virginia, characterized by rolling hills and winding paths overlooking the James River. ... Nickname River City Motto Sic Itur Ad Astra Location Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Government Country State County United States Virginia Independent City Mayor L. Douglas Wilder Geographical characteristics Area  - Total  - Land  - Water 62. ...


Lee wrote the article about Robert E. Lee (1894) in the Great Commanders series, and Cuba's Struggle Against Spain (1899). 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


External links

  • Eight pages of photos

References

  • Eicher, John H., & Eicher, David J.: Civil War High Commands, Stanford University Press, 2001, ISBN 0-8047-3641-3
Preceded by:
William E. Cameron
Governor of Virginia
1886–1890
Succeeded by:
Philip W. McKinney
Governors of Virginia Virginia State Flag
HenryJeffersonFlemingNelsonHarrisonHenryE RandolphB Randolph • H Lee • BrookeWoodMonroePageCabellTyler SrG SmithMonroeG SmithRandolphBarbourNicholasPrestonRandolphPleasantsJ TylerGilesJ FloydTazewellRobertsonCampbellGilmerPattonRutherfordGregoryMcDowellW "EB" SmithJB FloydJohnson • Wise • LetcherW "EB" SmithPierpontWellsWalkerKemperHollidayCameronF LeeMcKinneyFerrallJH TylerMontagueSwansonMann • Stuart • DavisTrinkleByrdPollardPeeryPriceDardenTuckBattleStanleyAlmondA HarrisonGodwinHoltonGodwinDaltonRobbBalilesWilderAllenGilmoreWarnerKaine

This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain. William E. Cameron - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Tim Kaine, the current Governor The Governor of Virginia serves as the chief executive of the Commonwealth of Virginia for a four-year term. ... Philip Watkins McKinney (May 1, 1832-March 1, 1899) American politician who served as a Democratic Governor of Virginia from 1890 to 1894. ... Tim Kaine, the current Governor The Governor of Virginia serves as the chief executive of the Commonwealth of Virginia for a four-year term. ... File links The following pages link to this file: Alexandria, Virginia Virginia Wikipedia talk:WikiProject U.S. states Frederick County, Virginia Richmond, Virginia Norfolk, Virginia Montgomery County, Virginia Bedford, Virginia Roanoke, Virginia Hopewell, Virginia Greene County, Virginia Gloucester County, Virginia York County, Virginia Wythe County, Virginia Wise County, Virginia Westmoreland... Patrick Henry (May 29, 1736 – June 6, 1799) was a prominent figure in the American Revolution, known and remembered primarily for his stirring oratory. ... Thomas Jefferson (April 13, 1743 N.S. – July 4, 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–1809), principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers of the United States. ... William Fleming (July 6, 1736 – February 16, 1824) was an American lawyer and jurist from Virginia. ... Thomas Nelson, Jr. ... Benjamin Harrison V Benjamin Harrison (V) (April 5, 1726 – April 24, 1791) was an American planter and revolutionary leader from Charles City County, Virginia. ... Patrick Henry (May 29, 1736 – June 6, 1799) was a prominent figure in the American Revolution, known and remembered primarily for his stirring oratory. ... Edmund Jennings Randolph (August 10, 1753 – September 12, 1813) was an American attorney, Governor of Virginia, Secretary of State, and the first United States Attorney General. ... Beverley Randolph (September 11, 1753– February 1797) was a American politician from Virginia. ... Henry Lee III (January 29, 1756 - March 25, 1818), 18th century American general, called Light Horse Harry, was born near Dumfries, Virginia. ... Robert Brooke (1751-1799) was a Virginia politician. ... James Wood (1747 - 1813) was a U.S. soldier and political figure. ... James Monroe (April 28, 1758 – July 4, 1831) was the fifth (1817–1825) President of the United States and author of the Monroe Doctrine. ... John Page (born 17 April 1744 in Gloucester County, Virginia; died 11 October 1808) was a figure in early United States history. ... William H. Cabell (December 16, 1772-January 12, 1853) a Virginia politician and Democratic-Republican. ... John Tyler (February 28, 1747-January 6, 1813) was a Virginia planter, judge, Governor of Virginia (1808-1811), and father of President John Tyler. ... George William Smith (1762-1811) was a Virginia politician. ... James Monroe (April 28, 1758 – July 4, 1831) was the fifth (1817–1825) President of the United States and author of the Monroe Doctrine. ... George William Smith (1762-1811) was a Virginia politician. ... Peyton Randolph (1779-1828) Virginia politician. ... James Barbour (June 10, 1775-June 7, 1842) was an American lawyer, a member and speaker of the Virginia house of delegates, the 19th Governor of Virginia, and United States Secretary of War from 1825-1828. ... Wilson Cary Nicholas (1761–1820) was an American politician who served in the U.S. Senate from 1799 to 1804 and was the governor of Virginia from 1814 to 1816. ... James Patton Preston (1774 - 1853) was a U.S. political figure. ... Thomas Mann Randolph Jr. ... James Pleasants (1769–1836) was an American politician who served in the U.S. Senate from 1819 to 1822 and was the governor of Virginia from 1822 to 1825. ... John Tyler (March 29, 1790 – January 18, 1862) was the tenth (1841-1845) President of the United States. ... William Branch Giles (12 August 1762–4 December 1830) was an American statesman. ... John Floyd (April 24, 1783–August 17, 1837) was a United States Representative from Virginia. ... Littleton Waller Tazewell (December 17, 1774–May 6, 1860) was a U.S. Senator from and governor of Virginia. ... Wyndham Robertson (January 26, 1803-February 11, 1888), Governor of Virginia, from 1836 to 1837. ... David Campbell (August 2, 1779-March 19, 1859) Governor of Virginia 1837-1840. ... Thomas Walker Gilmer (April 6, 1802–February 28, 1844) was an American statesman. ... John Mercer Patton (August 10, 1797 – October 29, 1858) was a U.S. Representative from the state of Virginia. ... John Rutherford (1792 - 1866) was a U.S. political figure. ... John Munford Gregory (1804 - 1884) was a U.S. political figure and governor of Virginia from 1842 to 1843. ... James McDowell (October 13, 1795-August 24, 1851) Congressman and Governor of Virginia, 1843-1846. ... William Smith (September 6, 1797 – May 18, 1887), known as Extra Billy, was a lawyer, Governor of Virginia, U.S. Congressman, and one of the oldest Confederate generals in the American Civil War. ... John Buchanan Floyd (June 1, 1807–August 26, 1863), American politician, was born at Blacksburg, Virginia. ... Joseph Johnson (1785–1877) was a U.S. political figure. ... Henry Alexander Wise (December 3, 1806–September 12, 1876) was an American statesman from Virginia. ... John Letcher (1813-1884) of Lexington, Virginia, was an American lawyer, journalist, politician, served as Representative in U.S. Congress (1851-1859), Governor of Virginia (1860-1864), Delegate in Virginia General Assembly 1875-1877, and on the Board of Visitors of Virginia Military Institute 1866-1880. ... William Smith (September 6, 1797 – May 18, 1887), known as Extra Billy, was a lawyer, Governor of Virginia, U.S. Congressman, and one of the oldest Confederate generals in the American Civil War. ... Francis Harrison Pierpont (January 25, 1814–March 24, 1899), called the Father of West Virginia, was an American lawyer, politician, and governor of the union controlled parts of Virginia during the Civil War. ... Henry Horatio Wells (1823-1890) was born September 17, 1823. ... Gilbert Carlton Walker (1833–1885) was a United States political figure. ... James L. Kemper James Lawson Kemper (June 11, 1823 – April 7, 1895) was a lawyer, a Confederate general in the American Civil War, and a governor of Virginia. ... Frederick W.M. Holliday (February 22, 1828-May 29, 1899) a Governor of Virginia from 1878 to 1882. ... William E. Cameron - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Philip Watkins McKinney (May 1, 1832-March 1, 1899) American politician who served as a Democratic Governor of Virginia from 1890 to 1894. ... Charles Triplett OFerrall (October 21, 1840 - September 22, 1905) was an American politician who served as the Governor of Virginia from 1894 to 1898. ... James Hoge Tyler (1846 - 1925) was a U.S. political figure. ... Andrew Jackson Montague (1862 - 1937) was a U.S. political figure. ... Claude Augustus Swanson (March 31, 1862–July 7, 1939) was an American politician. ... William Hodges Mann (1843 - 1927) was a U.S. political figure. ... Henry Carter Stuart (1855 - 1933) was a U.S. political figure. ... Westmoreland Morley Davis (August 21, 1859-September 7, 1942) a lawyer, farmer, and Governor of Virginia from February 1, 1918 to February 1, 1922. ... Elbert Lee Trinkle or E. Lee Trinkle (1876-1939) an American politician who served as Governor of Virginia from 1922 to 1926. ... Harry Flood Byrd, Sr. ... John Garland Pollard (1871 - 1937) was an American politician. ... George C. Peery (October 28, 1873-October 14, 1952), was an American Democratic politician, and was Governor of Virginia from 1934-1938. ... James Hubert Price (1878 - 1943) was a American politician. ... Colgate Whitehead Darden, Jr. ... William M. Tuck (1896-1983) served as Governor of Virginia from 1946 to 1950 as a Democrat. ... John Stweart Battle (July 11, 1890-April 9, 1972) was an American politician and Democratic Governor of Virginia from 1950-1954. ... Thomas Bahnson Stanley (1890 - 1970) was an American politician. ... Categories: Wikipedia cleanup | Stub | 1898 births | 1986 deaths | Governors of Virginia ... Albertis S. Harrison Jr. ... Mills Edwin Godwin, Jr. ... A. Linwood Holton Jr. ... Mills Edwin Godwin, Jr. ... John Nichols Dalton (1931–1986) was a Republican Governor of the U.S. state of Virginia from 1978 to 1982. ... Sen. ... Gerald L. Baliles (born 1940) was the Governor of Virginia from 1986 to 1990. ... Lawrence Douglas Wilder (born January 17, 1931) is an American politician. ... George Felix Allen (born March 8, 1952 in Whittier, California) is a Republican U.S. Senator from Virginia. ... James S. Gilmore III (born October 6, 1949), commonly known as Jim Gilmore, is a United States Republican Party politician. ... Mark Robert Warner (born December 15, 1954) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Virginia and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Timothy Michael Kaine (born February 26, 1958 in St. ... Encyclopædia Britannica, the 11th edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Fitzhugh Lee information - Search.com (741 words)
Fitzhugh Lee (November 19, 1835 – April 18, 1905), nephew of Robert E. Lee, was a Confederate cavalry general in the American Civil War, Governor of Virginia, diplomat, and U.S. Army general in the Spanish-American War.
Lee was born at "Clermont," in Fairfax County, Virginia.
Lee was at once employed in the organization of the forces of the South, and served at first as a staff officer to General Richard S. Ewell, and afterwards, from September 1861, as lieutenant colonel, and from April 1862 as colonel of the 1st Virginia Cavalry, based on J.E.B. Stuart's recommendation on July 25, 1862.
Fitzhugh Lee - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (741 words)
Fitzhugh Lee (November 19, 1835 – April 18, 1905), nephew of Robert E. Lee, was a Confederate cavalry general in the American Civil War, Governor of Virginia, diplomat, and U.S. Army general in the Spanish-American War.
Lee was born at "Clermont," in Fairfax County, Virginia.
Lee was at once employed in the organization of the forces of the South, and served at first as a staff officer to General Richard S. Ewell, and afterwards, from September 1861, as lieutenant colonel, and from April 1862 as colonel of the 1st Virginia Cavalry, based on J.E.B. Stuart's recommendation on July 25, 1862.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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