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Encyclopedia > Fisk University

{{THESE FOOLS GOT OWNED



Hermosa, Herman and Jefferson Sts.
Nashville, Tennessee | nearest_city = | lat_degrees = | lat_minutes = | lat_seconds = | lat_direction = | long_degrees = | long_minutes = | long_seconds = | long_direction = | area = | built = | architect = | architecture = Italianate; Queen Anne | added = February 9, 1978 | visitation_num = | visitation_year = | refnum = 78002579 | mpsub = | governing_body = Fisk University }} “Nashville” redirects here. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ...

Jubilee Hall, Fisk University
(U.S. National Historic Landmark)
Location: 17th Ave., N.
Nashville, Tennessee
Architect: Stephen D. Hatch
Architectural style(s): Gothic
Designated as NHL: December 2, 1974
Added to NRHP: December 9, 1971
NRHP Reference#: 71000817
Governing body: Fisk University
A class circa 1900
A class circa 1900

Fisk University is a historically black university in Nashville, Tennessee, U.S. It was established by John Ogden, Reverend Erastus Milo Cravath and Reverend Edward P. Smith and named in honor of General Clinton B. Fisk of the Tennessee Freedmen's Bureau. Fisk opened to classes on January 9, 1866. Fisk heralded its first African American president with the arrival of Charles Spurgeon Johnson in 1947. Johnson was a premier sociologist, a scholar who had been the editor of Opportunity magazine, a noted periodical of the Harlem Renaissance. Fisk University is currently under the direction of its 14th president, the Honorable Hazel O'Leary, former Secretary of Energy under President William Jefferson Clinton. She is the second female president of the university. Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... “Nashville” redirects here. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... In the United States, Historically black colleges and universities (HBCU) are colleges or universities that were established before 1964 with the intention of serving the African American community. ... “Nashville” redirects here. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... General Clinton Bowen Fisk (1828-1890), for whom Fisk University is named, was a senior officer in the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands. ... The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands, popularly known as the Freedmens Bureau or (mistakenly) the Freedmans Bureau, was an agency of the government of the United States that was formed to aid distressed refugees of the United States Civil War, including former slaves and poor white... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, trade unions, universities, and countries. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion . If you disagree with its speedy deletion, please explain why on its talk page or at Wikipedia:Speedy deletions. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sociology (from Latin: socius, companion; and the suffix -ology, the study of, from Greek λόγος, lógos, knowledge [1]) is the systematic and scientific study of society, including patterns of social relationships, social action, and culture[2]. Areas studied in sociology can range from the analysis of brief contacts between anonymous... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Harlem Renaissance(also known as the Black Literary Renaissance and The New Negro Movement) refers to the flowering of African American cultural and intellectual life during the 1920s and 1930s. ... Hazel OLeary Hazel Rollins OLeary (born May 17, 1937) was the seventh United States Secretary of Energy from 1993 to 1997. ... Seal of the United States Department of Energy The United States Secretary of Energy, the head of the United States Department of Energy, is concerned with The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ...

Fisk University, Nashville, Tennessee, 1900 - Theological Hall
Fisk University, Nashville, Tennessee, 1900 - Theological Hall

Fisk University features the world-famous Fisk Jubilee Singers, originally a group of traveling students who set out from Nashville to earn enough money to save the school and raise sufficient funds to build the first permanent structure in the country solely built for the education of newly-freed slaves, the renowned and recently-restored Jubilee Hall. It is the oldest, and most distinctive, structure of Victorian architecture on the 40 acre (160,000 m²) Fisk campus. Image File history File links Fisk_uni_theo_hall. ... Image File history File links Fisk_uni_theo_hall. ... The Fisk Jubilee Singers were a group of African American singers in the 1870s. ... Manchester Town Hall is an example of Victorian architecture found in Manchester, UK. The Carson Mansion is an example of a Victorian home in Eureka, California, USA The term Victorian architecture can refer to one of a number of architectural styles predominantly in the Victorian era. ...


Fisk University is also the home of a music literature collection founded by the noted Harlem Renaissance figure Carl van Vechten, according to the Encyclopedia Britannica article on Carl van Vechten. Carl Van Vechten (June 17, 1880 – December 21, 1964) was an American writer and photographer who was a patron of the Harlem Renaissance and the literary executor of Gertrude Stein. ...


Among many other notable firsts, Fisk University was the first historically black college or university to earn its Phi Beta Kappa Charter in 1952. The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an honor society which considers its mission to be fostering and recognizing excellence in undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Notable alumni

University Founder Clinton B. Fisk

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... General Clinton Bowen Fisk (1828-1890), for whom Fisk University is named, was a senior officer in the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands. ... Marion Barry Marion Shepilov Barry, Jr. ... St. ... Cora Mea Brown (born April 19, 1914, Bessemer, Alabama) was the first African-American woman elected to a United States state senate, winning a seat in the Michigan State Senate in 1954. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Power Plant, Harlem by Aaron Douglas in oil, 1939. ... W. E. B. Du Bois William Edward Burghardt Du Bois (pronounced ) (February 23, 1868 – August 27, 1963) was a civil rights activist, sociologist, educator, historian, writer, editor, poet, and scholar, and socialist. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... John H. Franklin John Hope Franklin (born January 2, 1915) is a United States historian and past president of the American Historical Association. ... The meaning of the word professor (Latin: [1]) varies. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... Yolande Cornelia Nikki Giovanni (born June 7, 1943 in Knoxville, Tennessee) is a Grammy-nominated American poet, activist and author. ... Louis George Gregory Louis George Gregory (b. ... The Hands of the Cause of God are a select group of Baháís, appointed for life, whose main function is to propagate and protect the Baháí Faith on the international level. ... This article is about the generally-recognized global religious community. ... Alcee Lamar Hastings (born September 5, 1936) is a U.S. politician, who was an impeached and removed federal judge and is currently a member of the House of Representatives representing Floridas 23rd congressional district (map). ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Roland Hayes (3 June 1887–1 January 1977) is considered the first African American male concert artist to receive wide international acclaim as well as at home. ... Robert James (born July 7, 1947) is a former American Football defensive back who played six seasons from 1969 to 1974 for the Buffalo Bills in the National Football League. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... Percy Lavon Julian (April 11, 1899 – April 19, 1975) was an American research chemist and a pioneer in the chemical synthesis of medicinal drugs from plants. ... James Weldon Johnson (June 17, 1871 – June 26, 1938) was a leading American author, critic, journalist, poet, anthropologist, educator, lawyer, songwriter, early civil rights activist, and prominent figure in the Harlem Renaissance. ... African American flag Lift Evry Voice and Sing — often called The Black National Anthem — was written as a poem by James Weldon Johnson (1871-1938) and then set to music by his brother John Rosamond Johnson (1873-1954) in 1899. ... For other persons named John Lewis, see John Lewis (disambiguation). ... The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (or SNCC, pronounced snick) was one of the principal organizations of the American Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s. ... Alma Powell, born Alma Vivian Johnson in Birmingham, Alabama, is an audiologist and the wife of military and political figure Colin Powell, whom she married in 1962. ... General Colin Luther Powell, United States Army (Ret. ... Kym Elizabeth Whitley (born June 7, 1961 in Shaker Heights, Ohio, USA) is an American actor and comedian. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... A comedian, or comic, is an entertainer who amuses an audience by making them laugh. ... Matthew Knowles is an African-American record executive and manager. ... Beyoncé Giselle Knowles (IPA pronunciation: [1]) (born September 4, 1981) is an American R&B singer, songwriter, record producer, music video director, actress, dancer, and fashion designer. ...

Notable faculty

  • Lee Lorch, mathematician and civil rights activist. Fired in 1955 for refusing to testify before the House Un-American Activities Committee.
  • Hon. Hazel O'Leary, Secretary of Energy during the Clinton Administration
  • Nikki Giovanni, author, poet, activist
  • John W. Work III, Choir Director, Ethnomusicologist and scholar of Afro-American folk music

Lee Lorch (born 1915) is a mathematician and was an early civil rights activist. ... HUAC hearings House Committee on Un-American Activities (HUAC or HCUA) (1938–1975) was an investigative committee of the United States House of Representatives. ...

External links

Part of the Tom Joyner Foundation for HBCUs. Tom Joyner (born 1949) is an African-American talk radio host. ...

  • BlackAmericaWeb.com Official Web Site

  Results from FactBites:
 
Fisk University (482 words)
Fisk University began as Fisk Free Colored School, one of several schools founded for freedmen during the Union military occupation of Nashville.
In December of 186S, General Clinton Bowen Fisk, head of the Kentucky-Tennessee Freedmen's Bureau, secured housing for the school in several old Union army hospital buildings between Church and Cedar (Charlotte) streets near Shaftesbury Avenue and the Union army's contraband camp.
With the reopening of the Nashville public schools in the fall of 1867, the institution was chartered as Fisk University on August 22.
Fisk University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (393 words)
Fisk University is a historically fl college in Nashville, Tennessee, USA.
Fisk University is currently under the direction of its 14th president, the Honorable Hazel O'Leary, former Secretary of Energy under President William Jefferson Clinton.
Fisk University features the world-famous Fisk Jubilee Singers, originally a group of traveling students who set out from Nashville to earn enough money to save the school and raise sufficient funds to build the first permanent structure in the country solely built for the education of newly-freed slaves, the renowned and recently-restored Jubilee Hall.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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