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Encyclopedia > Fishbourne Roman Palace
Mosaics at Fishbourne Roman Palace

Fishbourne Roman Palace, in the village of Fishbourne in West Sussex, is one of the most important archaeological sites in England. Although local people had known of the existence of Roman remains in the area, it was not until 1960 that the archaeologist Barry Cunliffe first systematically excavated the site, which had been accidentally uncovered by workmen when a water main was being laid. The Roman villa excavated by Cunliffe's team was so large that it became known as Fishbourne Roman Palace, and a museum was erected to protect and preserve some of the remains in situ. This is administered by the Sussex Archaeological Society. Although due to new finds, there are new theories arising to what may have been built here. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (600x800, 95 KB)Mosaics at Fishbourne Roman Palace File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (600x800, 95 KB)Mosaics at Fishbourne Roman Palace File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... for disambiguation. ... West Sussex is a county in the south of England, bordering onto East Sussex (with Brighton and Hove), Hampshire and Surrey. ... Archaeology, archeology, or archæology (from Greek: αρχαίος, archae, ancient; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of material remains and environmental data, including architecture, artifacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the  United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total 130... 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ... Sir Barrington Windsor Cunliffe CBE (born December 10, 1939), known as Barry Cunliffe, has been Professor of European Archaeology at the University of Oxford since 1972. ... The Roman Empire contained many kinds of villas. ... The Sussex Archaeological Society, founded in 1846, is the largest county-based archaeological society in the UK. Its headquarters are in Lewes, Sussex. ...


The palace consisted of four large wings with colonnaded fronts, forming a square around a formal garden. The north and east wings consisted of suites of rooms built around courtyards, with a monumental entrance in the middle of the east wing. In the north-east corner was an aisled assembly hall. The west wing contained state rooms, a large ceremonial reception room, and a gallery. The south wing contained the owner's private apartments. The palace also included as many as 50 mosaic floors, under-floor central heating and an integral bathhouse. In size, it is approximately equivalent to Nero's Golden House in Rome or to the Roman villa at Piazza Armerina in Sicily, and is by far the largest Roman residence known north of the Alps. At about 500 feet (150 metres) square, it is comparable in size to Buckingham Palace. Enormous colonnade of the Kazan Cathedral in St Petersburg. ... Mosaic is the art of decoration with small pieces of colored glass, stone or other material. ... For the Grand Central Records albums, see Central Heating (Grand Central album) and Central Heating 2. ... Nero[1] Claudius Caesar Augustus Germanicus (December 15, 37 – June 9, 68)[2], born Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus, also called Nero Claudius Caesar Drusus Germanicus, was the fifth and last Roman Emperor of the Julio-Claudian dynasty. ... The Domus Aurea (Latin for Golden House) was a large palace built by the Roman emperor Nero after the fire that devastated Rome in 64 AD had cleared the aristocratic dwellings on the slopes of the Esquiline Hill. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... The Roman Empire contained many kinds of villas. ... Piazza Armerina is an Italian comune in the province of Enna of the autonomous island region of Sicily. ... Sicily (Sicilia in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Buckingham Palace and the Victoria Memorial. ...


A modern museum has been built, incorporating most of the visible remains including one wing of the palace. The gardens have been re-planted using authentic plants from the Roman period. A team of volunteers and professional archaeologists are involved in a continuing research excavation on the site of nearby, possibly military, buildings. The last dig in 2002 produced some interesting results, and the final report is eagerly awaited. Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ...


The first buildings on the site were granaries, apparently a supply base for the Roman army, constructed in the early part of the conquest (43). Later, two timber-frame buildings were constructed, one with clay and mortar floors and plaster walls which appears to have been a dwelling house of some comfort. These buildings were demolished in the 60s and replaced by a substantial stone-walled house, which included a courtyard garden with colonnades and a bath suite. The palace itself, incorporating the previous house in its south-east corner, was begun ca. 73. Granary at Thiruparaithurai, Kumbakonam (old temple town), built around 1600-1634 A granary is a storehouse for threshed grain or animal feed. ... Roman invasion of Britain: Britain was the target of invasion by forces of the Roman Republic and Roman Empire several times during its history. ... Events Aulus Plautius, with 4 legions, landed on Britain. ... Events Boudicca sacks London (approximate date). ... This article is about the year 73. ...


The most widely accepted theory, proposed by Professor Cunliffe, is that the palace was the residence of Tiberius Claudius Cogidubnus, a pro-Roman local chieftain who was installed as king of a number of territories following the first stage of the conquest. Cogidubnus is known from a reference to his loyalty in Tacitus's Agricola, and from an inscribed altar found in nearby Chichester. Another theory is that it was built for Sallustius Lucullus, a Roman governor of Britain of the late 1st century who may have been the son of the British prince Adminius. Tiberius Claudius Cogidubnus (or Togidubnus) was king of the Regnenses, a southern British tribe. ... Gaius Cornelius Tacitus Publius (or Gaius) Cornelius Tacitus (c. ... The Agricola (full Latin title: De vita et moribus Iulii Agricolae) is a book by the Roman historian Tacitus, written c. ... For the larger local government district, see Chichester (district). ... Sallustius Lucullus (d. ... Adminius was a son of Cunobelinus, ruler of the Catuvellauni, a tribe of Iron Age Britain. ...


The palace outlasted Cogidubnus and was extensively re-planned in the 2nd century. Further redevelopment was begun in the late 3rd century, but these alterations were left incomplete when the north wing was destroyed in a fire in 270. The damage was too great to repair, and the palace was abandoned and later dismantled.The dismantled parts were reused in the constructions of other buildings in the surrounding area. The 2nd century is the period from 101 - 200 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... // Overview Events 212: Constitutio Antoniniana grants citizenship to all free Roman men 212-216: Baths of Caracalla 230-232: Sassanid dynasty of Persia launches a war to reconquer lost lands in the Roman east 235-284: Crisis of the Third Century shakes Roman Empire 250-538: Kofun era, the first...


References

  • Peter Clayton (ed) (1980), A Companion to Roman Britain
  • John Morris (1982), Londinium: London in the Roman Empire
  • Keith Brannigan (1980), Roman Britain: Life in an Imperial Province
  • Miles Russell (2006), "Roman Britain's Lost Governor", Current Archaeology 204, pp. 630-635
  • Norman Hammond, "Whose busts are they?", The Times, 31 July 2006, retrieved 31 August 2006.

The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom since 1785, and under its current name since 1788. ...

External links

  • Fishbourne Roman Palace Museum
  • Romans in Sussex - Fishbourne Palace

  Results from FactBites:
 
Fishbourne (290 words)
Fishbourne is a village near Chichester in West Sussex, the location of one of the most important archaeological sites in the United Kingdom.
The Roman villa excavated by Cunliffe's team was so large that it became known as Fishbourne Roman Palace, and a museum was erected to protect and preserve some of the remains in situ.
The most widely accepted theory is that the palace was the residence of Togidubnus[?], a local chieftain who became a client king, ie.
Fishbourne Roman Palace at AllExperts (560 words)
Fishbourne Roman Palace, in the village of Fishbourne in West Sussex, is one of the most important archaeological sites in England.
In size, it is approximately equivalent to Nero's Golden House in Rome or to the Roman villa at Piazza Armerina in Sicily, and is by far the largest Roman residence known north of the Alps.
The palace outlasted Cogidubnus and was extensively re-planned in the 2nd century.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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