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Encyclopedia > First ascent

In climbing, a first ascent (FA) is the first climb to reach the top of a mountain, or the first to follow a particular climbing route. First ascents are notable because they are the climbs that entail genuine exploration; the risks are higher and the challenge greater than for any later climber. Climbers on Valkyrie at the Roaches. ... Mount McKinley (Denali) in Alaska (USA) has the highest visible base-to-summit elevation on Earth (approximately 5400 metres). ... Southern and northern Mount Everest climbing routes as seen from the International Space Station. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ...


Many of the earlier first ascents, particularly for difficult routes, involved a mix of free and aid climbing. As a result, purist free climbers also identify a first free ascent (FFA), made using equipment for protection only and thus more challenging. In free solo climbing and bouldering, the climber carries nothing but a chalk bag. ... Aid climbing is a style of climbing in which fixed or placed protection is used to make upward progress. ...


First ascents, free or otherwise, are generally carefully recorded as part of the history of a mountain or climbing area, and usually mentioned in guidebooks. Some area guidebooks consciously choose to omit this information, so as to discourage disputes over priority and excessive bolting of faces so as to be able to add up new "first ascents." In some cases, particularly those of prominent mountains, the details of a first ascent are scanty or unknown; sometimes the only evidence of prior visitation is a cairn, artifacts, or inscriptions discovered at the summit. A climbing area is a small geographical region with a concentration of opportunities for climbing. ... This page describes terms and jargon related to climbing and mountaineering. ... One of many cairns marking British mass graves at the site of the Battle of Isandlwana. ...


The term "last ascent" has been used facetiously to refer to a climb that is so unpleasant or unaesthetic (due to loose rock, excessive brush, etc) that no one would ever willingly repeat the first ascent party's ordeal.


See also


[http://www.karakorumexplorers.com.pk Karakorum Explorers Pakistan]
Karakorum Adventure Pakistan The following list summarizes the first ascents of mountains and peaks around the world, in chronological order Category: ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Todd Skinner's Virtual Climbing Tour (251 words)
He accomplished more than 300 first ascents in 26 countries around the world and established new climbs at the highest level of difficulty.
He relished the challenge of all aspects of rock climbing, from bouldering to Himalayan peaks, but most of all dreamed about Big Walls that could be free climbed in all corners of the globe.
Todd was invited to be one of three adventures included in National Geographic's first "Live from National Geographic" lecture program held outside of Washington DC.
NodeWorks - Encyclopedia: First ascent (206 words)
In climbing, a first ascent (FA) is the first climb to reach the top of a mountain, or the first to follow a particular climbing route.
First ascents are notable because they are the climbs that entail genuine exploration; the risks are higher and the challenge greater than for any later climber.
First ascents, free or otherwise, are generally carefully recorded as part of the history of a mountain or climbing area, and usually mentioned in guidebooks.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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