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Encyclopedia > First appearance

In comic books, first appearance refers to first comic book to feature a character. A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ...

Contents

Monetary value of first appearance issues

Action Comics #1 (June 1938), the debut of Superman. Cover art by Joe Shuster.
Action Comics #1 (June 1938), the debut of Superman. Cover art by Joe Shuster.
Detective Comics #27 (May 1939), first appearance of Batman. Art by Bob Kane
Detective Comics #27 (May 1939), first appearance of Batman. Art by Bob Kane
Captain America Comics #1 (March 1941), first appearance of Captain America. Art by Jack Kirby
Captain America Comics #1 (March 1941), first appearance of Captain America. Art by Jack Kirby

First appearances of popular characters are among the most valuable comic books in existence. In their spring 2002 issue, the editors of The Overstreet Comic Book Price Guide listed the ten most valuable comic books and seven were first appearances of popular superheroes. [1] (Another, Marvel Comics #1 (Oct. 1939), is the first appearance of The Human Torch but it is probably more noteworthy because it was the first comic book published by industry giant Marvel Comics). Cover of Action Comics #1. ... Cover of Action Comics #1. ... Cover of Action Comics #1, which featured the debut of Superman. ... This article is about the character. ... Joseph Joe Shuster (July 10, 1914 - July 30, 1992) was a Canadian-born comic book artist best known for co-creating the DC Comics character Superman, with writer Jerry Siegel, first published in Action Comics #1 (March 1938). ... Cover of Detective Comics #27 (May 1939) by Bob Kane. ... Cover of Detective Comics #27 (May 1939) by Bob Kane. ... Cover of Detective Comics #27 (May 1939). ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Bob Kane (born Robert Kahn, October 24, 1915 – November 3, 1998) was an American comic book artist and writer credited as the creator of Batman. ... Download high resolution version (500x673, 110 KB)Captain America Comics #1, Timely Comics, March 1941. ... Download high resolution version (500x673, 110 KB)Captain America Comics #1, Timely Comics, March 1941. ... Captain America (1941-2007), the alter ego of Steve Rogers[1], is a superhero in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Jack Kirby (August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books. ... Batman and Superman, two of the most recognizable and iconic superheroes. ... The first cover appearance of Namor the Sub-Mariner on Marvel Mystery Comics #4, February, 1940. ... The Human Torch is a Marvel Comics-owned superhero. ... Marvel Comics is an American comic book line published by Marvel Publishing, Inc. ...


This is usually because by the time a character is well-known, even iconic, many years have passed since his or her first appearance and few copies, and fewer good-conditioned copies, remain. These comic books may be worth thousands of dollars. In 2004, a copy of Flash Comics #1 (Jan. 1940), the first appearance of The Flash, was auctioned for $42,000 [2] and a copy of Captain America Comics #1 (March 1941), the first appearance of Captain America sold for $64,400 [3]. The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... The Golden Age Flash as created by Gardner Fox & Harry Lampert The Flash is a DC Comics superhero possessing super-speed. ... The Flash is a name shared by several DC Comics superheroes. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Captain America (1941-2007), the alter ego of Steve Rogers[1], is a superhero in the Marvel Comics universe. ...


The world’s most valuable comic book is likely Action Comics #1 (June 1938), the first appearance of Superman. This issue essentially ushered in the Golden Age of Comic Books and began the superhero genre. Fewer than a hundred copies are known to exist. At $350,000, it topped the Overstreet list. In 2003, the head of Diamond Comic Distributors offered one million dollars for a near-mint copy [4], although a copy in such good condition has never been discovered. Cover of Action Comics #1, which featured the debut of Superman. ... This article is about the character. ... Superman, catalyst of the Golden Age: Superman #14 (Feb. ... Diamond Comic Distributors, Inc. ...


Several factors determine the value of a first appearance. Note: All values are according to ComicsPriceGuide.com and are for editions certified by the Certified Collectibles Group (see below):

  • The importance of the character(s) that debuted; the first appearance of Spider-Man in very fine condition is listed at $45,150; the first appearance of the less popular Iron Man, in the same condition, is listed at $3,837.
  • The rareness of comic book itself; comics from the Golden Age are usually more valuable than later comic books because they are older and fewer copies survive. Spider-Man is undoubtedly more popular than The Spectre but Spider-Man’s 1962 first appearance is valued at $45,150 while a copy of The Spectre's 1940 debut, in fine condition, is valued at $54,000. Also, first appearances often lack value if they are issues of high-profile, best-selling titles. Except during a 1990s collector’s bubble, the first appearances of several Image Comics characters and newer X-Men have not been as valuable as one may expect for such popular characters because those comics were widely produced.
  • Other reasons for historical importance; The Fantastic Four (Nov. 1961) #1 is not only the first appearance of the eponymous group but also represents a turning point in the history of Marvel Comics and is the first issue of a long-running series.
  • Occasionally, a comic book is the first appearance of more than one important character. Usually the characters are related; X-Men #1 (Sept. 1963) introduced the X-Men and their archenemy Magneto. However, rarely a comic book is the first appearance of two unrelated, important characters. More Fun Comics #73 (Nov. 1941) introduced both Green Arrow and Aquaman, who have little relation to one another [5]. This is also the case with Action Comics #1, which contained the first apppearance of Zatara, as well as the aforementioned Superman.
  • Occasionally a first appearance will lack the value expected for a character of such stature because the debut was not splashy. Wonder Woman, an immensely popular and historically important hero, debuted in All Star Comics #8 (Dec. 1941) in one of several stories and was not featured on the cover. This issue is valued at $30,000 in fine condition. Comparatively, the first appearances of equally (or even less) important peers Green Lantern and The Flash, boldly introduced on their covers, are worth $131,250 and $69,000, respectively. Arguably, the first appearance of Wonder Woman is worth much less because she did not make a flashy debut that lent the comic book an air of history.
  • As is the case with all collectables, condition greatly affects the value of comic books, although considerable wear is expected for decades-old comics. Most comic books are worth more if their condition is certified and they are protectively packaged (or "slabbed") by the Certified Collectibles Group, a professional grading service involved in the sale of most high-value comic books, although some fans accuse the group of inflating the value of comics [6].

Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... Iron Man (Anthony Edward Stark) is a fictional comic book character and former superhero in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The Spectre is a fictional cosmic entity and superhero who has appeared in numerous comic books published by DC Comics. ... 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar). ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1940 calendar). ... Comic book collecting is the collecting of comic books in the interest of appreciation, nostalgia, financial profit, and completion of the collection. ... Image Comics Logo Image Comics is an American comic book publisher. ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... The Fantastic Four is Marvel Comics flagship superhero team, created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby and debuting in The Fantastic Four #1 (Nov. ... The Uncanny X-Men, first published as simply The X-Men, is the flagship Marvel Comics comic book series within the X-Men franchise. ... Magneto is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... More Fun Comics was a DC Comics title which began as New Fun Comics in February 1935 and changed to More Fun with its seventh issue. ... Green Arrow is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. ... Aquaman is a fictional character, a superhero in DC Comics. ... Giovanni Zatara is a fictional character in the DC Universe. ... Wonder Woman is a fictional DC Comics superheroine co-created by William Moulton Marston and wife Elizabeth Holloway Marston. ... This article is about the 1940s comic book series. ... For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ...

Reader interest in first appearances

Amazing Fantasy #15 (Aug. 1962), the first appearance of Spider-Man. Art by Jack Kirby
Amazing Fantasy #15 (Aug. 1962), the first appearance of Spider-Man. Art by Jack Kirby

Collectors value first appearances for their rareness and historical value, while many regular readers are interested in viewing how their favorite characters were originally portrayed. Reprints of first appearances are often published, both as single comic books and in trade paperbacks, usually with other early appearances of the character. Marvel Comics' "Essential" line has become popular by giving readers an affordable glimpse into characters' early history [7]. Download high resolution version (486x738, 78 KB)Cover of Marvel Comics Amazing Fantasy #15, the first appearance of Spider-Man. ... Download high resolution version (486x738, 78 KB)Cover of Marvel Comics Amazing Fantasy #15, the first appearance of Spider-Man. ... The introduction of Spider-Man: Amazing Fantasy #15 (Aug. ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... Jack Kirby (August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books. ... Comic book collecting is the collecting of comic books in the interest of appreciation, nostalgia, financial profit, and completion of the collection. ... In comics, a trade paperback (TPB) specifically refers to the periodic collections, published in book format, of stories published in comic books, usually capturing one story arc in the series. ... Marvel Comics is an American comic book line published by Marvel Publishing, Inc. ...


Historically, first appearances tell the origin story for the character, although some, such as Batman and Green Goblin, remained dubious figures for several issues. Modern writers prefer to tell a character’s origin across an entire story arc or keep a newly introduced character mysterious until a "secret origin" issue. Some fans consider this a gimmick and prefer the older method [8]. In comic book terminology, the phrase origin story refers to a story or backstory revealing how a character or team gained superpowers, or the circumstances under which they became superheroes or supervillians. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... The Green Goblin is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics Universe, a supervillain considered one of Spider-Man’s greatest foes. ... Wolverine, a member of the X-Men, a popular franchise in the Modern Age, and an anti-hero, a popular character type The Modern Age of Comic Books is an informal name for the period in the history of mainstream American comic books generally considered to last from the mid... A gimmick is a unique or quirky special feature that makes something stand out from its contemporaries. ...


The artistic merit of many first appearances is debatable. The events portrayed in most famous first appearances are continuously retconed, rebooted and/or expanded upon by subsequent writers. Like many golden and silver age comics, first appearances often become dated and do not fit the modern portrayal of the character. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Reboot, in series fiction, means to discard all previous continuity in the series and start anew. ... Superman, catalyst of the Golden Age: Superman #14 (Feb. ... Showcase #4 (Oct. ...


However, some first appearances are considered classics. 1990s-era Spider-Man writer Howard Mackie said that his favorite story featuring the character was his first appearance and origin story in Amazing Fantasy #15 (Aug. 1962), stating that writer Stan Lee and artist Steve Ditko "gave us everything we needed, I wanted or could ask for in the least possible space. Every single person who retells the origin never improves on the original, they simply expand it." [9] Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... Howard Mackie is an American comic book editor and writer. ... The introduction of Spider-Man: Amazing Fantasy #15 (Aug. ... Stan The Man Lee (born Stanley Martin Lieber on December 28, 1922 [1] New York, New York) is an American writer, editor, Chairman Emeritus of Marvel Comics, and memoirist, who — with several artist co-creators, most notably Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko — introduced complex, naturalistic characters and a thoroughly shared... The Amazing Spider-Man Annual #1 (1964): Cover art by Ditko. ...


Ambiguity of first appearance

Tales of Suspense #39 (March 1963), the first appearance of Iron Man. Art by Jack Kirby
Tales of Suspense #39 (March 1963), the first appearance of Iron Man. Art by Jack Kirby
X-Men #1 (Sept. 1963), the first appearance of the X-Men. Art by Jack Kirby
X-Men #1 (Sept. 1963), the first appearance of the X-Men. Art by Jack Kirby
The Incredible Hulk #181 (Nov. 1974), the first appearance of Wolverine. Art by Herb Trimpe
The Incredible Hulk #181 (Nov. 1974), the first appearance of Wolverine. Art by Herb Trimpe

While a seemingly a simple concept, determining the first appearance may be complex; comic book fans are infamously nitpicky about such matters. The following are instances in which a character’s first appearance may be difficult to determine: Download high resolution version (485x738, 147 KB)Cover to Tales of Suspense #39, featuring Iron Man. ... Download high resolution version (485x738, 147 KB)Cover to Tales of Suspense #39, featuring Iron Man. ... - ==References== - *Tales of Suspense #1-99 (Marvel Comics, January 1959 - March 1968) - *Marvel Select: Tales of Suspense #1 (1996) - - - - - - - - - Categories: | | ... Iron Man (Anthony Edward Stark) is a fictional comic book character and former superhero in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Jack Kirby (August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books. ... Cover to Uncanny X-Men #1. ... Cover to Uncanny X-Men #1. ... The Uncanny X-Men, first published as simply The X-Men, is the flagship Marvel Comics comic book series within the X-Men franchise. ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... Jack Kirby (August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books. ... Cover of The Incredible Hulk #181, November 1974. ... Cover of The Incredible Hulk #181, November 1974. ... The Incredible Hulk The Hulk, often called The Incredible Hulk, is a Marvel Comics superhero. ... For other uses, see Wolverine (disambiguation). ... The Incredible Hulk #181 (Nov. ...

  • Those unfamiliar to comics may assume that Iron Man’s first appearance is The Invincible Iron Man #1 (May 1968). However, in the golden and early silver ages of comic books, few superheroes debuted in magazines carrying their names. More often a character first appeared in a generically titled anthology series. If the character proved popular, a new series was launched. For example, Iron Man first appeared in Tales of Suspense #39 (March 1963) and appeared regularly in that series for five years before Marvel launched a series properly named Iron Man. Wonder Woman, Spider-Man, The Mighty Thor and many others also first appeared in anthology series.
  • The first appearance of "all-star" teams is given as the first instance in which that team banded together regardless of whether or not it consists of previously existing characters. The first appearance of The Justice League of America is considered The Brave and the Bold #28 (May 1960), the issue in which they first operated as a group, although none of its members first appeared in that issue. Alternatively, X-Men #1 (Sept. 1963) is both the first appearance of the X-Men and that of each of the team’s original members.
  • Sometimes a character first appears in the last page of an issue, foreshadowing his or her greater role in the next issue. Arguments can ensue over whether the first appearance is the issue containing the final page cameo or the subsequent issue which more adequately introduced the character. Wolverine was first seen in the last page of The Incredible Hulk #180 (Oct. 1974) but makes a more full appearance in issue #181 (Nov. 1974). Stricter fans may consider The Incredible Hulk #180 Wolverine’s first appearance but most consider it #181. ComicsPriceGuide.com lists a copy of issue #180, rated very fine, at $149 and #181 at $2,075. Comparatively, The Incredible Hulk #179 (Dec. 1974), which has no special importance, is listed at $11, so both types of first appearance add value to a comic book.
  • Retconning can also complicate first appearances. Initially, Cable was portrayed as a wholly new character, first appearing in The New Mutants #87 (March 1990). However, writers later changed his background, stating that Cable is an adult, time-traveling Nathan Summers, the son of Cyclops and Madelyne Pryor, first seen in Uncanny X-Men #201 (Jan 1986). Both issues could be given as the first appearance of Cable. Further complicating the matter, Cable was seen in a cameo at the end of The New Mutants #86 (Feb. 1990).
  • Some superhero identities are used by more than one character. The original Green Lantern first appeared in All-American Comics #16 (April 1940). During the Silver Age, Green Lantern, like many DC heroes, was rebooted with a totally new identity. The second Green Lantern, Hal Jordan, debuted in Showcase #22 (Oct. 1959). All-American Comics #16 is still considered the first appearance of Green Lantern, both of the original title-bearer and the superhero identity itself. To avoid confusion, Showcase #22 is called the first appearance of Hal Jordan, of Green Lantern II or of the Silver Age Green Lantern.
  • Occasionally, a character will appear in the background of a comic book before fully introduced. Spider-Man’s early love interest Liz Allan is first addressed by name in Amazing Spider-Man #4 (Sept. 1963). However, an unnamed character in Amazing Spider-Man #1 (March 1963) is, based on her appearance and dialogue, probably Allan. Plus, Amazing Fantasy #15 (Aug. 1962), shows an unnamed, unspeaking character who looks exactly like Allan. Thus Allan's first appearance may be given as any of the three.
  • Some characters appear in more than one continuity. While the first appearance of Nightcrawler is Giant-Size X-Men #1 (May 1975), the first appeared of “Ultimate Nightcrawler” (Nightcrawler in the alternate Ultimate Marvel universe) is Ultimate X-Men #6 (Aug. 2001).
  • Sometimes new characters are created for television or film adaptations of a franchise and are later added to the comic book continuity. The Batman adversary Harley Quinn debuted in the 1992 Batman: The Animated Series episode Joker's Favor. Her first appearance in comic format was the graphic novel The Batman Adventures: Mad Love, which took place in the continuity of Batman: The Animated Series. Her first appearance in the regular "DC Universe" was the 1999 one-shot Batman: Harley Quinn. Thus her first appearance is technically Joker's Favor, her first appearance in a comic book was Mad Love and her first appearance in the regular DC Comics continuity was Batman: Harley Quinn. Similarly, Firestar first appeared in Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends #1, which adapted the first episode of the TV series. Her first Earth-616 appearance was in The Uncanny X-Men #193.
  • Rarely, a character debuts in a publisher’s foreign branch and then appears in a domestic series. Psylocke first appeared in Captain Britain #8 (Dec. 1976), an original series of Marvel UK not widely available outside of Great Britain. Her debut in an American series was The New Mutants Annual #2 (1986). Her first appearance is sometimes given as either but more correctly it is Captain Britain #8 while The New Mutants Annual #2 is her first US appearance.


Iron Man (Anthony Edward Stark) is a fictional comic book character and former superhero in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Superman, catalyst of the Golden Age: Superman #14 (Feb. ... Showcase #4 (Oct. ... ANThology is the first major label album by Alien Ant Farm. ... - ==References== - *Tales of Suspense #1-99 (Marvel Comics, January 1959 - March 1968) - *Marvel Select: Tales of Suspense #1 (1996) - - - - - - - - - Categories: | | ... Wonder Woman is a fictional DC Comics superheroine co-created by William Moulton Marston and wife Elizabeth Holloway Marston. ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... Thor battles his evil step-brother, Loki. ... The Justice League is a DC Comics superhero team. ... The Brave and the Bold is a DC Comics comic book that is currently in monthly publication in a second volume. ... The Uncanny X-Men, first published as simply The X-Men, is the flagship Marvel Comics comic book series within the X-Men franchise. ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... Foreshadowing is a literary device in which an author drops subtle hints about plot ys a gun or knife early in the story. ... 2002 Lincoln cent, obverse, proof with cameo Cameo is a method of carving, or an item of jewelry made in this manner. ... For other uses, see Wolverine (disambiguation). ... The Incredible Hulk The Hulk, often called The Incredible Hulk, is a Marvel Comics superhero. ... Retroactive continuity – commonly contracted to the portmanteau word retcon – refers to the act of changing previously established details of a fictional setting, often without providing an explanation for the changes within the context of that setting. ... Cable (Nathan Christopher Summers, a. ... New Mutants may also refer to the genetically engineered superhumans of Mutant X (TV series). ... Unsolved problems in physics: Is time travel theoretically and practically possible? If so, how can paradoxes such as the grandfather paradox be avoided? Time travel is the concept of moving backwards or forwards to different points in time, in a manner analogous to moving through space. ... Cyclops (Scott Summers) is a fictional character who exists in the Marvel Comics Universe, a superhero who is the field leader of the X-Men. ... Madelyne Pryor is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The Uncanny X-Men, first published as simply The X-Men, is the flagship Marvel Comics comic book series within the X-Men franchise. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Alan Scott is a fictional hero from the DC Comics universe and the first superhero to bear the name Green Lantern. ... All-American Comics was the flagship title for its publisher, also called All-American Comics. ... For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ... DC Comics is one of the largest American companies in comic book and related media publishing. ... ReBoot was a Canadian (CGI) animated series that was produced by Mainframe Entertainment, created by Gavin Blair, Ian Pearson, Phil Mitchell and John Grace, with character designed by Brendan McCarthy and Ian Gibson. ... Hal Jordan is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. ... Showcase Comics was a series used to try out new characters by DC Comics. ... Elizabeth Allan, who usually goes by the name Liz Allan (commonly misspelled, even in the published comics themselves, as Liz Allen), is a fictional comic book character in the Marvel Comics universe, part of the supporting cast of Spider-Man (Peter Parker). ... In fiction, continuity is consistency of the characteristics of persons, plot, objects, places and events seen by the reader or viewer. ... Nightcrawler (Kurt Wagner) is a fictional comic book superhero, and a member of the X-Men, appearing in books published by Marvel Comics. ... Nightcrawler (Kurt Wagner) is a fictional comic book superhero, and a member of the X-Men, appearing in books published by Marvel Comics. ... The various characters of the Ultimate Marvel Universe, as seen on the cover to Ultimates (v2) #12. ... Ultimate X-Men is a superhero comic book published by Marvel Comics. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Harley Quinn (real name Dr. Harleen Quinzel) is a fictional character, a supervillainess in the animated series Batman: The Animated Series, as well as the DC Comics Batman series and its spin-offs, and subsequently in various Batman-related comic books. ... The animated Batman shoots his grappling gun from a rooftop in a scene from the episode, On Leather Wings. ... See comedian Stand up comedian List of Comedians List of British comedians comics comic book comic strip underground comics alternative comics web comic sprite comics manga graphic novel List of comic characters This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the... Trade paperback of Will Eisners A Contract with God (1978), often mistakenly cited as the first graphic novel. ... Mad Love Mad Love was an extremely popular comic book written by Paul Dini (The writer and director of Batman The Animated Series and Batman Beyond, dubbed an icon of the 19990s) and Bruce W. Timm (executive producer on The New Batman/Superman Adventures and the co-creator of... Cover to the History of the DC Universe trade paperback. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Firestar (Angelica Angel Jones) is a fictional mutant superhero in the Marvel Comics universe. ... TV screenshot of the shows title. ... In the fictional Marvel Universe, Earth-616 or Earth 616 is the name used to identify the primary continuity in which most Marvel Comics titles take place. ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... Psylocke (Elisabeth Betsy Braddock, sometimes Elizabeth) is a Marvel Comics superhero, sister to Captain Britain, and often associated with the X-men. ... Captain Britain (Brian Braddock), briefly known as Britannic, is a fictional character, a superhero appearing in the comic books published by Marvel Comics. ... The Mighty World of Marvel #1: The very first Marvel UK title published in 1972. ...


First appearances of popular heroes, villains and teams

Note: All values are according to Comics Price Guide. Prices given are for the best available editions. Thus prices of Golden Age comics are for editions in "fine" condition because editions in better condition for such old comics are either extremely rare or have never been confirmed to exist. Prices for Silver Age and subsequent comics are for "very fine" editions. Priced are also for editions graded by the Certified Collectibles Group. Superman, catalyst of the Golden Age: Superman #14 (Feb. ... Showcase #4 (Oct. ...

Character(s) First Appearance Cover Date Publisher Estimated Value
Superman Action Comics #1 June 1938 DC Comics $375,0001
Batman Detective Comics #27 May 1939 DC Comics $300,000
Namor the Sub-Mariner Marvel Comics #1 Oct. 1939 Timely Comics $250,000
The Flash; Hawkman Flash Comics #1 Jan. 1940 All-American Pubs. $69,000
Captain Marvel Whiz Comics #2 Feb. 1940 Fawcett Comics $28,080
Robin Detective Comics #38 May 1940 DC Comics $43,125
Lex Luthor Action Comics #23 May 1940 DC Comics $8,025
The Joker; Catwoman Batman #1 Spring 1940 DC Comics $112,5002
Green Lantern All-American Comics #16 July 1940 All-American Pubs. $131,250
Captain America Captain America Comics #1 March 1941 Timely Comics $86,250
Aquaman; Green Arrow More Fun Comics #73 Nov. 1941 DC Comics $10,050
Wonder Woman All Star Comics #8 Dec. 1941 All-American Pubs. $30,000
The Justice League of America The Brave and the Bold #28 May 1960 DC Comics $8,127
The Fantastic Four The Fantastic Four #1 Nov. 1961 Marvel Comics $28,896
The Hulk The Incredible Hulk #1 May 1962 Marvel Comics $21,672
Dr. Doom The Fantastic Four #5 June 1962 Marvel Comics $4,154
Spider-Man Amazing Fantasy #15 Aug. 1962 Marvel Comics $45,150
Iron Man Tales of Suspense #39 March 1963 Marvel Comics $3,837
X-Men; Magneto X-Men #1 Sept. 1963 Marvel Comics $13,545
The Avengers The Avengers #1 Sept. 1963 Marvel Comics $5,148
Daredevil Daredevil #1 April 1964 Marvel Comics $3,160
Teen Titans The Brave and the Bold #54 July 1964 DC Comics $415
The Punisher Amazing Spider-Man #129 Feb. 1974 Marvel Comics $918
Wolverine The Incredible Hulk #181 Nov. 1974 Marvel Comics $2,027
  • Note 1: According to Comics Price Guide, Action Comics #1 is likely to be worth $758,000, in mint condition.
  • Note 2: Batman #1, the first appearance of The Joker and Catwoman, is especially valuable since it is also the first issue of a long-running series and the first comic book to bear Batman's name as its title.

This article is about the character. ... Cover of Action Comics #1, which featured the debut of Superman. ... DC Comics is one of the largest American companies in comic book and related media publishing. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Cover of Detective Comics #27 (May 1939). ... DC Comics is one of the largest American companies in comic book and related media publishing. ... Namor the Sub-Mariner is a fictional character featured in the Marvel Comics Universe, and one of the oldest superhero characters. ... Marvel Comics is an American comic book line published by Marvel Publishing, Inc. ... Timely Comics is the 1940s comic book publishing company that would evolve into Marvel Comics. ... The Flash. ... For other meanings of the term, see Hawkman (disambiguation) Hawkman is a fictional DC Comics superhero. ... The Golden Age Flash as created by Gardner Fox & Harry Lampert The Flash is a DC Comics superhero possessing super-speed. ... The All-American logo, used on their titles during the 1945 split with National All-American Publications is one of three American comic book companies that combined to form the modern-day DC Comics, one of the worlds two largest comics publishers. ... For other uses, see Captain Marvel. ... Whiz Comics was a monthly ongoing comic book anthology series, which was published by Fawcett Comics from February 1940 to June 1952. ... Whiz Comics #2, the first appearance of Captain Marvel, the companys most popular character. ... Robin is a fictional superhero published by DC Comics. ... Cover of Detective Comics #27 (May 1939). ... DC Comics is one of the largest American companies in comic book and related media publishing. ... Lex Luthor is a fictional DC Comics supervillain. ... Cover of Action Comics #1, which featured the debut of Superman. ... DC Comics is one of the largest American companies in comic book and related media publishing. ... The Joker can mean any of the following: The Joker is a comic strip character, also included in movies and television programs based on the comic strip. ... Catwoman is a fictional character associated with DC Comics Batman franchise and created by Bill Finger and Bob Kane. ... Batman #1 Spring 1940 Art by Bob Kane and Jerry Robinson. ... DC Comics is one of the largest American companies in comic book and related media publishing. ... For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ... All-American Comics was the flagship title for its publisher, also called All-American Comics. ... The All-American logo, used on their titles during the 1945 split with National All-American Publications is one of three American comic book companies that combined to form the modern-day DC Comics, one of the worlds two largest comics publishers. ... Captain America (1941-2007), the alter ego of Steve Rogers[1], is a superhero in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Timely Comics is the 1940s comic book publishing company that would evolve into Marvel Comics. ... Aquaman is a fictional character, a superhero in DC Comics. ... Green Arrow is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. ... More Fun Comics was a DC Comics title which began as New Fun Comics in February 1935 and changed to More Fun with its seventh issue. ... DC Comics is one of the largest American companies in comic book and related media publishing. ... Wonder Woman is a fictional DC Comics superheroine co-created by William Moulton Marston and wife Elizabeth Holloway Marston. ... This article is about the 1940s comic book series. ... The All-American logo, used on their titles during the 1945 split with National All-American Publications is one of three American comic book companies that combined to form the modern-day DC Comics, one of the worlds two largest comics publishers. ... The Justice League of America, featuring the Flash, Superman, Aquaman, Batman, Wonder Woman, the Martian Manhunter, and Green Lantern. ... The Brave and the Bold is a DC Comics comic book that is currently in monthly publication in a second volume. ... DC Comics is one of the largest American companies in comic book and related media publishing. ... The Fantastic Four is Marvel Comics flagship superhero team, created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby and debuting in The Fantastic Four #1 (Nov. ... The Fantastic Four is Marvel Comics flagship superhero team, created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby and debuting in The Fantastic Four #1 (Nov. ... Marvel Comics is an American comic book line published by Marvel Publishing, Inc. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Marvel Comics is an American comic book line published by Marvel Publishing, Inc. ... Cover to Heroes Reborn: Fantastic Four #5. ... The Fantastic Four is Marvel Comics flagship superhero team, created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby and debuting in The Fantastic Four #1 (Nov. ... Marvel Comics is an American comic book line published by Marvel Publishing, Inc. ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... The introduction of Spider-Man: Amazing Fantasy #15 (Aug. ... Marvel Comics is an American comic book line published by Marvel Publishing, Inc. ... Iron Man (Anthony Edward Stark) is a fictional comic book character and former superhero in the Marvel Comics universe. ... - ==References== - *Tales of Suspense #1-99 (Marvel Comics, January 1959 - March 1968) - *Marvel Select: Tales of Suspense #1 (1996) - - - - - - - - - Categories: | | ... Marvel Comics is an American comic book line published by Marvel Publishing, Inc. ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... Magneto is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... Marvel Comics is an American comic book line published by Marvel Publishing, Inc. ... The Avengers are a fictional superhero team that appear in the Marvel Universe. ... The Avengers are a fictional superhero team that appear in the Marvel Universe. ... Marvel Comics is an American comic book line published by Marvel Publishing, Inc. ... This article is about the Marvel Comics superhero. ... This article is about the Marvel Comics superhero. ... Marvel Comics is an American comic book line published by Marvel Publishing, Inc. ... Teen Titans redirects here. ... The Brave and the Bold is a DC Comics comic book that is currently in monthly publication in a second volume. ... DC Comics is one of the largest American companies in comic book and related media publishing. ... The Punisher (Frank Castle) is a Marvel Comics anti-hero. ... The Amazing Spider-Man is the title of both a comic book published by Marvel Comics and a daily newspaper comic strip. ... Marvel Comics is an American comic book line published by Marvel Publishing, Inc. ... For other uses, see Wolverine (disambiguation). ... The Incredible Hulk The Hulk, often called The Incredible Hulk, is a Marvel Comics superhero. ... Marvel Comics is an American comic book line published by Marvel Publishing, Inc. ... Mint Condition is a six-person R&B band from the Twin Cities. ...

See also

Comic book collecting is the collecting of comic books in the interest of appreciation, nostalgia, financial profit, and completion of the collection. ... This is a list of first appearances of artifacts, characters, dimensions, locations, species, and teams in publications by Marvel Comics. ...

External links

  • List of first appearances of superheroes
  • List of first appearances of supervillains

  Results from FactBites:
 
appearance: Definition, Synonyms and Much More from Answers.com (2542 words)
An appearance can also be made by filing a notice of appearance with the clerk of the court and the plaintiff, which states that the defendant will either submit to the authority of the court or challenge its jurisdiction.
By making a general appearance, the defendant agrees that the court has the power to bind her or him by its actions, and waives the right to raise any jurisdictional defects (e.g., by claiming that the service of process was improper).
A limited appearance enables a defendant to defend the action on the merits, but should the defendant lose, he or she will be held liable only up to the value of the identified property and not for all possible damages.
The Historicity of the Empty Tomb Evaluated: Appearance Traditions (3320 words)
The first appearance recounted in the formula found in 1 Corinthians 15 is the one to Kephas.
The strongest competitor to Peter for the distinction of first appearance is Mary Magdalene.
This indicates that the Jerusalem appearance stories follow on the heels of the empty tomb story, and thus that the empty tomb story is a relatively recent development in the Gospel of Mark, because the author of Mark retained the older tradition of appearances to the disciples and Peter in Galilee.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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