FACTOID # 25: If you're tired of sitting in traffic on your way to work, move to North Dakota.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > First Minister of Scotland
Scotland

This article is part of the series:
Politics and government of
Scotland
This article is about the country. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Scotland. ... The Politics of Scotland forms a distinctive part of the wider politics of the United Kingdom, with Scotland one of the constituent countries of the United Kingdom. ...










Other countries · Atlas
 Politics Portal
view  talk  edit

The First Minister of Scotland (Scottish Gaelic: Prìomh Mhinistear na h-Alba; Scots: First Meinister o Scotland) is, in practice, the political leader of Scotland, as head of Scotland's national devolved government, the Scottish Executive, which was established in 1999 along with the Scottish Parliament. The First Minister heads the Scottish Cabinet and is primarily responsible for the formulation, development and presentation of Scottish government policy.[1] Additional functions of the First Minister include promoting and representing Scotland, in an official capacity, at home and abroad and responsibility for constitutional affairs, as they relate to devolution and the Scottish Executive.[1] Scots law is a unique legal system with an ancient basis in Roman law. ... For the national legislative body up to 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ... This is a list of Acts of the Scottish Parliament. ... The Presiding Officer (Oifigear-Riaghlaidh in Scots Gaelic) is the Speaker, the person elected by the Members of the Scottish Parliament to chair their meetings. ... Alex Fergusson (born 8 April 1949, Leswart, The Stewartry) is a Scottish Conservative and Unionist politician, and Member of the Scottish Parliament for Galloway and Upper Nithsdale since 2003. ... The new Scottish Parliament Building at Holyrood designed by the Catalan architect Enric Miralles and opened in October 2004. ... Member of the Scottish Parliament (MSP) (Ball Pàrlamaid na h-Alba (BPA) in Gaelic) is the title given to any one of the 129 individuals elected to serve in the Scottish Parliament. ... This is a list of Members of the Scottish Parliament (MSPs) or, in Gaelic, Buill Pàrlamaid na h-Alba (BPnA) elected to the first Scottish Parliament at the 1999 election. ... This is a list of Members of the Scottish Parliament (MSPs) or, in Gaelic, Buill Pàrlamaid na h-Alba (BPnA) elected to the second Scottish Parliament at the 2003 election. ... This is a list of Members of the Scottish Parliament (MSPs) or, in Gaelic, Buill Pàrlamaid na h-Alba (BPnA) elected to the third Scottish Parliament at the 2007 election. ... The Scottish Parliament (Holyrood) has 73 constituencies, each electing one Member of the Scottish Parliament (MSP) by the first past the post system of election, and eight additional member regions, each electing seven additional member MSPs. ... Scotland has elections to several bodies: the Scottish Parliament, the United Kingdom Parliament, the European Parliament, local councils and community councils. ... The Scottish Parliament election, 1999 was the first general election of the Scottish Parliament, with voting taking place on May 6th, 1999. ... The polling date for the second Scottish Parliament election was held on May 1, 2003. ... The composition of the Scottish Parliament following the 2007 election. ... The 2011 Scottish Parliament election will be the fourth general election to the devolved Scottish Parliament since it was created in 1999. ... A Legislative Consent Motion (formerly known as a Sewel motion) is a parliamentary motion passed by the Scottish Parliament, in which it agrees that the Parliament of the United Kingdom may pass legislation on a devolved issue extending to Scotland, over which the Scottish Parliament has regular legislative authority. ... The Executives logo, shown with English and Scottish Gaelic caption The term Scottish Executive is used in two different, but closely-related senses: to denote the executive arm of Scotlands national legislature (i. ... Alexander Elliot Anderson Salmond, known as Alex Salmond (born 31 December 1954 ) (age 52)), has been nominated by the Scottish Parliament as First Minister of Scotland. ... The Deputy First Minister of Scotland is, as the name suggests, the Deputy to the First Minister of Scotland. ... Nicola Sturgeon (born on 19 July 1970 in Irvine, North Ayrshire) is the Deputy Leader of the Scottish National Party (SNP). ... The 3rd Scottish Parliament convened after the 2007 election. ... The Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service is a government department in Scotland that is responsible for the public prosecution of alleged criminals. ... Her Majestys Advocate, known as the Lord Advocate (Morair Tagraidh in Scottish Gaelic) is the chief legal adviser to the Scottish Executive and the Crown in Scotland for both civil and criminal matters that fall within the devolved powers of the Scottish Parliament. ... Lord Advocate the Rt Hon. ... Her Majestys Solicitor General for Scotland (Àrd-neach-lagha a Chrùin an Alba) is one of the Law Officers of the Crown, and the deputy of the Lord Advocate, whose duty is to advise the Crown and the Scottish Executive on Scots Law. ... Frank Mulholland, QC, is a Scottish lawyer. ... Below is a list of executive agencies of the Scottish Executive. ... Scottish public bodies are a group of organisations that are funded by the Scottish Executive. ... Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons The Right Honourable Michael Martin MP Lord Speaker Hélène Hayman, Baroness Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups (as of May 5, 2005 elections) Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats... Scotland is divided into 59 constituencies of the United Kingdom Parliament - 19 Burgh constituencies and 40 County constituencies. ... The Scottish Grand Committee is a committee of the House of Commons. ... Scotland has elections to several bodies: the Scottish Parliament, the United Kingdom Parliament, the European Parliament, local councils and community councils. ... The UK general election, 1997 was held on 1 May 1997. ... Tony Blair William Hague Charles Kennedy The UK general election, 2001 was held on 7 June 2001 and was dubbed the quiet landslide by the media. ... It has been suggested that Marginal constituencies in the United Kingdom be merged into this article or section. ... Under the provisions of the Parliament Acts of 1911 and 1949, the next United Kingdom general election must be held on or before 3 June 2010, barring exceptional circumstances. ... This is a list of Members of Parliament (MPs) elected to the House of Commons by Scottish constituencies for the Fifty-Fourth Parliament of the United Kingdom (2005 to present). ... Her Majestys Government, or when the Sovereign is male, His Majestys Government, abbreviated HMG or HM Government, is the formal title used by the Government of the United Kingdom. ... The Secretary of State for Scotland (Rùnaire Stàite na h-Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is the chief minister in the government of the United Kingdom with responsibilites for Scotland, at the head of the Scotland Office (formerly The Scottish Office). ... Desmond Henry Browne (born 22 March 1952), commonly known as Des Browne, is a Scottish Labour Party politician. ... The Scotland Office (Oifis na h-Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is a department of the United Kingdom government, responsible for reserved Scottish affairs. ... In the United Kingdom reserved matters, also referred to as reserved powers, are those subjects over which power to legislate is retained by Westminster, as stated by the Scotland Act 1998, Northern Ireland Act 1998 or Government of Wales Act 1998. ... Her Majestys Advocate General for Scotland (Àrd-neach-tagraidh na Bànrighe airson Alba in Gaelic) is one of the Law Officers of the Crown, whose duty is to advise the Crown and UK Government on Scots law. ... Neil Forbes Davidson, Baron Davidson of Glen Clova QC BA, MSc, LLB, LLM (born 13 September 1950) is a Scottish lawyer. ... Established 1952, as the Common Assembly President Hans-Gert Pöttering (EPP) Since 16 January 2007 Vice-Presidents 14 Rodi Kratsa-Tsagaropoulou (EPP) Alejo Vidal-Quadras (EPP) Gérard Onesta (Greens – EFA) Edward McMillan-Scott (ED) Mario Mauro (EPP) Miguel Angel Martínez Martínez (PES) Luigi Cocilovo (ALDE) Mechtild... Scotland constitutes a single constituency of the European Parliament. ... Scotland has elections to several bodies: the Scottish Parliament, the United Kingdom Parliament, the European Parliament, local councils and community councils. ... The European Parliament election, 2004 was the UK part of the European Parliament election, 2004. ... Elections to the European Parliament will be held in June 2006 in the then–27 member states of the European Union, using varying election days according to local custom. ... The local government of Scotland is organised into 32 unitary authorities covering the mainland and islands of Scotland. ... For local government purposes, Scotland is divided into 32 areas designated as Council Areas of Scotland which are all governed by unitary authorities designated as Councils which have the option under the Local Government (Gaelic Names) (Scotland) Act 1997 (as chosen by Na h-Eileanan an Iar) of being known... The Convention of Scottish Local Authorities (COSLA) is the representative association of Scottish local government and is the employers’ association on behalf of all Scottish councils. ... Parties represented in the Scottish Parliament (in order of number of representatives): Labour Party - Centre-left, unionist - 50 MSPs Scottish National Party (SNP) - Centre-left, pro-independence- 27 MSPs Conservative and Unionist Party - Centre-right, unionist - 18 MSPs Liberal Democrats - Centre, federalist - 17 MSPs Scottish Green Party - Environmentalist, pro-independence... Information on politics by country is available for every country, including both de jure and de facto independent states, inhabited dependent territories, as well as areas of special sovereignty. ... // Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... Scots refers to the Anglic varieties spoken in parts of Scotland. ... This article is about the country. ... Look up Devolution in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Executives logo, shown with English and Scottish Gaelic caption The term Scottish Executive is used in two different, but closely-related senses: to denote the executive arm of Scotlands national legislature (i. ... For the national legislative body up to 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ... Dewar Government Donald Dewar, Scotlands first First Minister, obtained the Scottish Parliaments approval to the first slate of members of the Scottish Executive and Junior Scottish Ministers on 19 May 1999. ...


The First Minister is a Member of the Scottish Parliament (MSP) and nominated by the Scottish Parliament before being officially appointed by the monarch. Nominating members of the Cabinet and junior ministers of the Scottish Executive as well as Scottish law officers, are amongst the powers that the First Minister is able to exercise. The First Minister is directly accountable to the Scottish Parliament for his or her actions and the actions of the wider Scottish Government. Member of the Scottish Parliament (MSP) (Ball Pàrlamaid na h-Alba (BPA) in Gaelic) is the title given to any one of the 129 individuals elected to serve in the Scottish Parliament. ... Elizabeth II in an official portrait as Queen of Canada (on the occasion of her Golden Jubilee in 2002, wearing the Sovereigns badges of the Order of Canada and the Order of Military Merit) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary) (born 21 April 1926), styled HM The... The Scottish Government is an unofficial term often used to describe the Scottish Executive. ...


Alex Salmond, of the Scottish National Party (SNP) is the current First Minister of Scotland.[2] He was elected as the Parliament's nominee for First Minister on 16 May 2007 and was sworn in at the Court of Session the following day.[3] Alexander Elliot Anderson Salmond, known as Alex Salmond (born 31 December 1954 ) (age 52)), has been nominated by the Scottish Parliament as First Minister of Scotland. ... The Scottish National Party (SNP) (Scottish Gaelic: is a centre-left political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ... May 16 is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... The Court of Session is the supreme civil court in Scotland. ...

Contents

History

Following a referendum in 1997, in which the Scottish electorate gave their consent; a Scottish Parliament and devolved Scottish Executive were established by the Labour government of Tony Blair. The process was known as devolution and was initiated to give Scotland some measure of home rule or self governance in its domestic affairs, such as health, education and justice.[4] Devolution resulted in administrative and legislative changes to the way Scotland was governed, and resulted in the establishment of a post of First Minister to be head of the devolved Scottish Executive. The term "First Minister" is analogous to the use of Premier to denote the heads of government in sub-national entities, such as the provinces and territories of Canada, provinces of South Africa and the states of Australia.[5] Prior to devolution the comparable functions of the First Minister were exercised by the Secretary of State for Scotland, who headed the Scottish Office, which was a department of the wider United Kingdom Government and existed from 1885 to 1999. The Secretary of State was a member of the British Cabinet and appointed by the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom to have responsibility for the domestic affairs of Scotland. Since 1999, the Secretary of State has a much reduced role as a result of the transfer of responsibilities to the Scottish Parliament and Executive.[6] The current incumbent Des Browne holds the post whilst simultaneously (and separately) being the Secretary of State for Defence.[7] The Scotland referendum of 1997 was a pre-legislative referendum held in Scotland only, over whether there was support for the creation of an assembly for Scotland and whether there was support for an assembly with tax varying powers. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... Look up Devolution in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Devolution or Home rule is the pooling of powers from central government to government at regional or local level. ... Scots law is a unique legal system with an ancient basis in Roman law. ... A premier is an executive official of government. ... Administrative division is a generic term for an administrative region within a country — on an arbitrary level below that of the sovereign state — typically with a local government encompassing multiple municipalities, counties, or provinces with a certain degree of autonomy. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countriesAtlas  Politics Portal      Canada is a federation which consists of ten provinces that, with three territories, make up the worlds second largest country in total area. ... A map of the nine provinces of South Africa South Africa is currently divided into nine provinces. ... The states and territories of Australia make up the Commonwealth of Australia under a federal system of government. ... The Secretary of State for Scotland (Rùnaire Stàite na h-Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is the chief minister in the government of the United Kingdom with responsibilites for Scotland, at the head of the Scotland Office (formerly The Scottish Office). ... Categories: Stub | Scotland | Departments of the United Kingdom Government ... The agencies responsible for the government of the United Kingdom consist of a number of ministerial departments (usually headed by a Secretary of State) and non-ministerial departments headed by senior civil servants. ... In British politics, the Cabinet is comprised of the most senior government ministers, most of them heads of government departments with the title Secretary of State. The Cabinet is actually a committee of the Privy Council and all Cabinet members are also Privy Councillors and therefore have the prefix of... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ... Desmond Henry Browne (born 22 March 1952), commonly known as Des Browne, is a Scottish Labour Party politician. ... The Secretary of State for Defence is the senior United Kingdom government minister in charge of the Ministry of Defence. ...


Term

There is no term of office for a First Minister. The First Minister is a Member of the Scottish Parliament and like all ministers in the Scottish Executive, holds office "at Her Majesty's pleasure".[8] However to gain supply (control of exchequer funds) the government must be answerable to, and acceptable to, the Scottish Parliament, in reality the convention "at her Majesty's pleasure" means "Scottish Parliament". Whenever the office of First Minister falls vacant, the Sovereign is responsible for appointing the new incumbent; the appointment is formalised at a meeting between the First Minister designate and the Sovereign. In accordance with the Scotland Act, the Sovereign must appoint the individual who has been nominated by the Scottish Parliament to serve as First Minister.[8] Given the nature of the mixed member proportional representation system that is used to elected Members of the Scottish Parliament, it is extremely rare for a single party to gain an overall majority of seats in Parliament.[9] As a consequence, it is normally determined by Parliament that the leader of the largest party, or the leader of any coalition that is formed in the Parliament, be nominated to Her Majesty for appointment - although this need not be the case. Theoretically, any member of the Scottish Parliament, from any party grouping represented there, can be nominated to the monarch for appointment.[8] The only requirement is that the Scottish Parliament pass a resolution to that effect.[8] Member of the Scottish Parliament (MSP) (Ball Pàrlamaid na h-Alba (BPA) in Gaelic) is the title given to any one of the 129 individuals elected to serve in the Scottish Parliament. ... Ballot for electoral district 252, Würzburg, for the 2005 German federal election. ... A coalition is an alliance among entities, during which they cooperate in joint action, each in their own self-interest. ...


After a general election to the Scottish Parliament, A First Minister must be nominated within a period of 28 days following the election.[8] Under the terms of the Act, if Parliament fails to nominate a First Minister, within this time frame, it will be dissolved and a fresh election must be held.[8] If an incumbent First Minister is defeated in a general election, he does not immediately demit office. He only leaves office when the Scottish Parliament nominates a new individual to be presented to the monarch for appointment.[8] This is normally the second item of business on the agenda of a newly convened session of the Scottish Parliament - after the election of a Presiding Officer. Scotland has elections to several bodies: the Scottish Parliament, the United Kingdom Parliament, the European Parliament, local councils and community councils. ... The Presiding Officer (Oifigear-Riaghlaidh in Scots Gaelic) is the Speaker, the person elected by the Members of the Scottish Parliament to chair their meetings. ...


Once they have had an audience with the monarch, and have accepted office, the First Minister takes the Official Oath, as set out in the Promissory Oaths Act 1868.[10] The oath is tendered by the Lord President of the Court of Session at a sitting of the Court in Parliament House in Edinburgh.[10] The Official Oath is in the following form: The Lord President of the Court of Session is head of the judiciary in Scotland and presiding judge of the College of Justice and Court of Session. ... The Robert Reid designed facade to Parliament Square Parliament House in Edinburgh, Scotland was home to the Scottish Parliament, and is now used by the High Court of Justiciary and the Court of Session. ...

I, [name], do swear that I will well and truly serve Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth in the office of First Minister, So help me God.

The period in office of a First Minister is not linked to the term of Members of the Scottish Parliament. The Scotland Act set out a four year maximum term for each session of Parliament.[11] The Act specifies than an election to the Scottish Parliament will be held on the first Thursday in May, every four years, starting from 1999.[11] Parliament can be dissolved and an extraordinary general election held, before the expiration of the four year term, but only if two thirds (or more) of elected MSPs vote for such action in a resolution of the Scottish Parliament.[12] Member of the Scottish Parliament (MSP) is the title given to any one of the 129 individuals elected to serve in the Scottish Parliament. ...


The First Minister, once appointed continues in office as the head of the devolved Scottish Government until either they resign, are dismissed (in reality something not likely to happen except in exceptional circumstances) or die in office. Resignation can be triggered off by the passage of a Motion of No Confidence in the First Minister or the Scottish Executive or by rejecting a Motion of Confidence in the Scottish Parliament.[8] In those situations, the First Minister must tender his resignation to the monarch.[8] In doing so he tenders the resignation of all Scottish Executive Ministers who must leave office with immediate effect.[8] In such circumstances, it is the responsibility of the Presiding Officer to appoint an individual to serve as First Minister in the interim, until the Scottish Parliament determines on a new nominee to be presented to the Sovereign for formal appointment.[8] A motion of no confidence, also called a motion of non-confidence, a censure motion, a no-confidence motion, or simply a confidence motion, is a parliamentary motion traditionally put before a parliament by the opposition in the hope of defeating or embarrassing a government. ... A Motion of Confidence is a motion of support proposed by a government in a parliament or other assembly of elected representatives to give members of parliament (or other such assembly) a chance to register their confidence in a government. ...


Powers

Donald Dewar was the founding First Minister of Scotland, and held office from May 1999, until his death in October 2000.
Donald Dewar was the founding First Minister of Scotland, and held office from May 1999, until his death in October 2000.

The role and powers of the First Minister are set out in Sections 45 to 49 of the Scotland Act 1998.[8] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1712x2288, 563 KB) Statue of Scottish politician Donald Dewar, standing at the north end of Buchanan Street, Glasgow, Scotland. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1712x2288, 563 KB) Statue of Scottish politician Donald Dewar, standing at the north end of Buchanan Street, Glasgow, Scotland. ... Donald Campbell Dewar (August 21, 1937 – October 11, 2000) was First Minister of Scotland from 1999 until his death in 2000. ... The Scotland Act 1998 is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom at Westminster. ...


Following their appointment, the First Minister may then nominate ministers to sit in the Scottish Cabinet and Junior Ministers to form the Scottish Executive. Ministers, hold office at Her Majesty's Pleasure and may be removed from office, at any time, by the First Minister. The First Minister also has the power to appoint the Chief Legal Officers of the Scottish Executive - the Lord Advocate and the Solicitor General but only with the support of the Scottish Parliament. Dewar Government Donald Dewar, Scotlands first First Minister, obtained the Scottish Parliaments approval to the first slate of members of the Scottish Executive and Junior Scottish Ministers on 19 May 1999. ... The Executives logo, shown with English and Scottish Gaelic caption The term Scottish Executive is used in two different, but closely-related senses: to denote the executive arm of Scotlands national legislature (i. ... Her Majestys Advocate, known as the Lord Advocate (Morair Tagraidh in Scottish Gaelic) is the chief legal adviser to the Scottish Executive and the Crown in Scotland for both civil and criminal matters that fall within the devolved powers of the Scottish Parliament. ... Her Majestys Solicitor General for Scotland (Àrd-neach-lagha a Chrùin an Alba) is one of the Law Officers of the Crown, and the deputy of the Lord Advocate, whose duty is to advise the Crown and the Scottish Executive on Scots Law. ...


The First Minister is responsible to the Scottish Parliament for his/her actions and the actions of the overall Executive. MSPs can scrutinise the activities of the First Minister and his Cabinet by tabling written questions or by asking oral questions in the Scottish Parliament. Direct questioning of the First Minister takes place each Thursday at noon, when Parliament is sitting. The 30 minute session enables MSPs to ask question to the First Minister, on any issue. The leaders of the largest opposition parties have an allocation of questions and are allowed to question the First Minister each week. Opposition leaders normally ask an opening question to the First Minister, relating to his meeting with the Scottish Cabinet, or when he next expects to meet the Prime Minister, and then follow this up by asking a supplementary question on an issue of their choosing. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In addition to direct questioning, the First Minister is also able to deliver oral statements to the Scottish Parliament chamber, after which members are invited to question the First Minister on the substance of the statement. For example, at the beginning of each parliamentary term, the First Minister normally delivers a statement, setting out the legislative programme of the government, or a statement of government priorities over the forthcoming term.[13]


Associated with the office of First Minister, there is also the post of Deputy First Minister. Unlike the office of First Minister, the post of Deputy is not recognised in statute and confers no extra status on the holder. Like the First Minister, the Deputy First Minister is an elected Member of the Scottish Parliament and a member of the Scottish Executive. From 1999 to 2007, when Scotland was governed by a Labour/Liberal Democrat coalition, the leader of the Liberal Democrats - the junior government party, was given the role of Deputy First Minister; a title which they held in conjunction with another ministerial portfolio. For example, Nicol Stephen, Deputy First Minister from 2005 to 2007, simultaneously held the post of Minister for Enterprise and Lifelong Learning. The Deputy First Minister of Scotland is, as the name suggests, the Deputy to the First Minister of Scotland. ... Nicol Ross Stephen (born 23 March 1960) is the Deputy First Minister of Scotland, Minister for Enterprise and Lifelong Learning, leader of the Scottish Liberal Democrats, and Member of the Scottish Parliament for Aberdeen South. ...


On two occasions since 1999, the Deputy First Minister has assumed the role of 'Acting' First Minister, inheriting the powers of the First Minister in their absence or incapacitation. From 11 October 2000 to 26 October 2000, following the death in office of the then First Minister Donald Dewar, his deputy Jim Wallace became Acting First Minister, until the Labour party appointed a new leader, and consequently First Minister.[14] Wallace also became Acting First Minister between 8 November 2001 and 22 November 2001, following the resignation of Henry McLeish.[14] is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Donald Campbell Dewar (August 21, 1937 – October 11, 2000) was First Minister of Scotland from 1999 until his death in 2000. ... The Right Honourable Jim Wallace QC (born August 25, 1954 in Annan, Dumfries and Galloway) is a Scottish politician, first leader of the Scottish Liberal Democrats, first Deputy First Minister of the Scottish Executive, and and Member of the Scottish Parliament for Orkney. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Henry McLeish (born June 15, 1948) is a Scottish politician. ...


An officer with such a title need not always exist; rather, the existence of the post is dependent on the form of Cabinet organisation preferred by the First Minister and his or her party. The Deputy First Minister does not automatically succeed if a vacancy in the premiership is suddenly created. It may, however, be necessary for the Deputy to stand in for the First Minister on occasion, for example by taking the floor at First Minister's Question Time.


Precedence and privileges

Bute House at 6 Charlotte Square is the official residence of the First Minister of Scotland.

The First Minister is, ex officio, the Keeper of the Great Seal of Scotland and his place in the Order of precedence in Scotland is determined by the holding of that office.[15] The scale of precedence in Scotland was amended by Royal Warrant on 30 June 1999 to take account of devolution and the establishment of the post of First Minister.[15] The amended scale removed the function of Keeper of the Great Seal from the Secretary of State for Scotland and also created a rank for the Presiding Officer of the Scottish Parliament.[15] Throughout Scotland, the First Minister outranks all others except the Royal Family, Lord Lieutenants, the Sheriff Principal, the Lord Chancellor, the Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland (the Rev Sheilagh M Kesting from May 2007), the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Commonwealth Prime Ministers (whilst in the United Kingdom), the Speaker of the House of Commons and the Lord Speaker.[15] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Bute House is the official residence of the First Minister of Scotland, who is the head of the Scottish Executive, the countrys devolved government created in 1999. ... Bute House in Charlotte Square, official residence of the First Minister of Scotland Charlotte Square is a street in Edinburgh, Scotland part of the New Town, designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site. ... This page includes English translations of several Latin phrases and abbreviations such as . ... The Great Seal of Scotland allows the monarch to authorise official documents without having to sign each document individually. ... Denmark France Germany India Isle of Man Italy Jamaica New Zealand Norway Poland Romania Switzerland Spain United Kingdom United States The order of precedence in Scotland was fixed by Royal Warrant in 1905. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... The Presiding Officer (Oifigear-Riaghlaidh in Scots Gaelic) is the Speaker, the person elected by the Members of the Scottish Parliament to chair their meetings. ... Members of the Royal Family on the balcony of Buckingham Palace after the Trooping the Colour ceremony The British Royal Family is shared between the Commonwealth Realms; this article focuses on the perspective of United Kingdom. ... Flag of a Lord-Lieutenant The title Lord-Lieutenant is given to the British monarchs personal representatives around the United Kingdom. ... The office of sheriff principal is unique within the judicial structure of the United Kingdom, and it cannot therefore readily be compared with any other judicial office. ... The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and prior to the Union the Chancellor of England and the Lord Chancellor of Scotland, is a senior and important functionary in the government of the United Kingdom, and its predecessor states. ... The standard of the Moderator The Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland is an honorary role, held for 12 months. ... The Rev Sheilagh Kesting is a Scottish minister and the first female minister to be nominated to be Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ... Prime Ministers of Commonwealth nations in order of appointment: The Prime Minister of Barbados — Owen Arthur (1994) The Prime Minister of Grenada — Keith Mitchell (1995) The Prime Minister of Saint Kitts and Nevis — Denzil Douglas (1995) The Prime Minister of Australia — John Howard (1996) The Prime Minister of Saint Lucia... In the United Kingdom, the Speaker of the House of Commons is the presiding officer of the House of Commons, and is seen historically as the First Commoner of the Land. ... The Lord Speaker (or Lady Speaker) will be a new position in the British Parliament created once the Constitutional Reform Acts provisions about the Speakership of the House of Lords comes into effect. ...


As of April 2007, the First Minister is entitled to draw a total salary of £129,998, which is composed of a basic MSP salary of £53,091 plus an additional salary of £76,907 for his role as First Minister.[16] This can be compared to the UK Prime Minister who is entitled to draw a total salary of £187,611, composed of a basic MP salary of £60,277 and an additional office holders salary of £127,334.[16] The First Minister is the highest paid member of the Scottish Government. The Lord Advocate is the only other member of the Scottish Government whose salary exceeds £100,000.[16] However, the current First Minister, Alex Salmond is also an MP in the House of Commons as well as an MSP and First Minister. The Scotland Act stipulates that such "dual mandate" politicians receive their full Westminster salary (currently £60,277) plus one third of an MSP's annual wage of £53,091 (or £17,697).[17][18] As a consequence Alex Salmond has pledged to donate the £17,697 he is entited to, to a charitable trust to be set up in his mother's name, thereby only drawing his MP's salary and ministerial pay.[18] A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Type Lower House Speaker of the House of Commons Leader of the House of Commons Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Harriet Harman, QC, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader of the House of Commons Theresa May, PC, (Conservative) since December 6, 2005 Members 646 Political groups...


The First Minister traditionally resides at Bute House which is located at number 6 Charlotte Square in the New Town of Edinburgh.[19] The house became the property of the National Trust for Scotland in 1966, after the death of the previous owner John Crichton-Stuart, 4th Marquess of Bute and remains in the ownership of the National Trust.[19] Prior to devolution, Bute House was the official residence of the Secretary of State for Scotland.[19] Weekly meetings of the Scottish Cabinet take place in the Cabinet room of the house.[19] Bute House is also where the First Minister holds press conferences, hosts visiting dignitaries and employs and dismisses Executive Ministers. The offices of the First Minister are located in the Scottish Executive buildings at St Andrews House on Calton Hill in central Edinburgh.[20] The First Minister also has an office in the Scottish Parliament Building. Bute House is the official residence of the First Minister of Scotland, who is the head of the Scottish Executive, the countrys devolved government created in 1999. ... Bute House in Charlotte Square, official residence of the First Minister of Scotland Charlotte Square is a street in Edinburgh, Scotland part of the New Town, designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site. ... The Edinburgh New Town is a neo-classical masterpiece. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... The standard of the NTS The National Trust for Scotland, or NTS, describes itself as The conservation charity that protects and promotes Scotlands natural and cultural heritage for present and future generations to enjoy. ... The Most Honourable John Crichton-Stuart, 4th Marquess of Bute (20 June 1881–16 May 1947) was a Scottish peer, the son of John Crichton-Stuart, 3rd Marquess of Bute. ... Southern aspect of St Andrews House on Calton Hill. ... Calton hill is a Site of Special Scientific Interest in Derbyshire, showing Olivine Diorite magma chamber. ... The new Scottish Parliament Building at Holyrood designed by the Catalan architect Enric Miralles and opened in October 2004. ...


Appointments to the Privy Council of the United Kingdom are made by the monarch, although in practice they are made only on the advice of the UK government. To date all First Ministers have been appointed members of the Privy Council, and therefore entitled to use the title 'Right Honourable'. The First Minister is also one of the few individuals in Scotland officially permitted to fly the banner of the Royal Arms of Scotland, or Lion Rampant as it is more commonly known. Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... The British monarch or Sovereign is the monarch and head of state of the United Kingdom and its overseas territories, and is the source of all executive, judicial and (as the Queen-in-Parliament) legislative power. ... The United Kingdom is a unitary state and a democratic constitutional monarchy. ... This is a list of current members of Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council (year end 2005). ... The Right Honourable (abbreviated The Rt Hon. ... The Royal Coat of Arms of Scotland, used prior to 1603 by the Kings of Scotland The Royal Coat of Arms of Scotland is the historical coat of arms of the Kings and Queens of Scots, used by them until the personal union with the Kingdom of England in 1603. ... Heraldry is the science and art of designing, displaying, describing and recording coats of arms. ...


List of First Ministers

Name Entered Office Left Office Party Reason for leaving office
1. Donald Dewar 7 May 1999 11 October 2000 Labour Died in office
2. Henry McLeish 27 October 2000 8 November 2001 Labour Resigned
3. Jack McConnell 22 November 2001 16 May 2007 Labour Lost election
4. Alex Salmond 16 May 2007 Incumbent Scottish National Party n/a

Donald Campbell Dewar (August 21, 1937 – October 11, 2000) was First Minister of Scotland from 1999 until his death in 2000. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the Scottish Labour Party founded in 1976. ... Henry McLeish (born June 15, 1948) is a Scottish politician. ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the Scottish Labour Party founded in 1976. ... Jack Wilson McConnell (born June 30, 1960 in Irvine, North Ayrshire) is a former First Minister of Scotland, leader of the Scottish Labour Party and current Member of the Scottish Parliament (MSP) for the Motherwell and Wishaw constituency. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... May 16 is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... This article is about the Scottish Labour Party founded in 1976. ... Alexander Elliot Anderson Salmond, known as Alex Salmond (born 31 December 1954 ) (age 52)), has been nominated by the Scottish Parliament as First Minister of Scotland. ... May 16 is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... The Scottish National Party (SNP) (Scottish Gaelic: is a centre-left political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Scottish Cabinet and Ministers. Scottish Executive. Retrieved on 2007-08-05.
  2. ^ First Minister. Scottish Executive. Retrieved on 2007-08-10.
  3. ^ "MSPs approve new Scottish cabinet", BBC News online, accessed 20 May 2007
  4. ^ The Scottish Parliament - History - The Path to Devolution. Scottish Parliament. Retrieved on 2007-08-06.
  5. ^ House of Lords Debate - Power of Parliament to change titles. Hansard - House of Lords (1998-10-28). Retrieved on 2007-08-06.
  6. ^ Devolution Guidance Note 3 - The role of the Secretary of State for Scotland. Department for Constitutional Affairs (DCA) (October 2006). Retrieved on 2007-08-06.
  7. ^ Secretary of State for Defence and Secretary of State for Scotland. 10 Downing Street. Retrieved on 2007-08-06.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Section 45 - Scotland Act 1998. Office of Public Sector Information. Retrieved on 2007-07-30.
  9. ^ Proportional Representation - What is Proportional Representation?. Politics UK. Retrieved on 2007-08-07.
  10. ^ a b First Minister takes oath. Scottish Executive (2007-05-17). Retrieved on 2007-08-07.
  11. ^ a b Scotland Act 1998 - Ordinary General Elections. Office of Public Sector Information (OPSI). Retrieved on 2007-08-07.
  12. ^ Scotland Act 1998 - Extraordinary General Elections. Office of Public Sector Information (OPSI). Retrieved on 2007-08-07.
  13. ^ Statement of Government Priorities. Scottish Parliament Offical Report (2007-05-23). Retrieved on 2007-08-05.
  14. ^ a b World Statesmen - United Kingdom, Scotland. World Statesmen. Retrieved on 2007-08-04.
  15. ^ a b c d The Scale of General Precedence in Scotland. Burkes Peerage. Retrieved on 2007-08-04.
  16. ^ a b c Murray Earle (2007-04-02). Parliamentary Pay and Allowances. Scottish Parliament Information Centre (SPICe). Retrieved on 2007-08-04.
  17. ^ The Scotland Act 1998 (Transitory and Transitional Provisions)(Salaries and Allowances) Order 1999. Office of Public Sector Information (OPSI) (1999-04-08). Retrieved on 2007-08-04.
  18. ^ a b Hamish MacDonell (2007-07-10). Salmond pledges £17,000 a year to charity in parliamentary pay row. The Scotsman. Retrieved on 2007-08-04.
  19. ^ a b c d Bute House Guidebook. Scottish Executive (2003-01-03). Retrieved on 2007-08-10.
  20. ^ Departmental Contacts. Scottish Executive. Retrieved on 2007-08-10.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

The First Minister of Wales is the leader of Wales and of the Welsh Assembly Government, Waless devolved administration. ... The First Minister of Northern Ireland (Ulster Scots: Heid Männystèr o Norlin Airlann) and the Deputy First Minister of Northern Ireland (Ulster Scots: Heid Männystèr Depute o Norlin Airlann) are the leaders of the Northern Ireland Executive, Northern Irelands home rule government set up in... The term First Minister refers to the leader of a cabinet United Kingdom In the United Kingdom, the term First Minister was once used interchangeably with Prime Minister, as in Winston Churchills famous line: I did not become Her Majestys First Minister so that I might oversee the... The new Scottish Parliament Building at Holyrood designed by the Catalan architect Enric Miralles and opened in October 2004. ... Members of the Scottish Parliament (MSPs) are entitled to a salary, and where applicable, expenses and allowances. ...

External links

Order of precedence in Scotland
Preceded by
Speaker of the House of Commons
Order of Precedence
(gentlemen)
Succeeded by
Presiding Officer of the Scottish Parliament

  Results from FactBites:
 
First Minister of Scotland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (488 words)
The First Minister (First Meinister in Scots; Prìomh Mhinistear in Scots Gaelic) is the leader of Scotland's national devolved government, the Scottish Executive, which was established in 1999 along with the reconvened Scottish Parliament.
The inaugural First Minister, Donald Dewar (Labour) styled himself as the Father of the Nation.
The First Minister is Keeper of the Great Seal of Scotland, and his place in the order of precedence in Scotland is determined by that office.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m