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Encyclopedia > Firecracker
Exploding firecracker
Exploding firecracker

A firecracker (also known as a cracker, noise maker, banger or bunger) is a small explosive device primarily designed to produce a large amount of noise, especially in the form of a loud bang; any visual effect is incidental to this goal. They have fuses, and are wrapped in heavy paper casing, to contain the explosive compound. Firecrackers, along with fireworks are now thought to have originated in China. Firecracker may refer to: A firecracker, a small explosive device Firecracker (2005 film), the 2005 film starring Mike Patton and Karen Black Firecracker, an album by Lisa Loeb released in 1997 Firecracker, the third album by The Wailin Jennys Firecracker EP, the 1998 debut release from Unwed Sailor Firecracker, a... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 399 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (533 × 800 pixel, file size: 52 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Firecracker ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 399 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (533 × 800 pixel, file size: 52 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Firecracker ... This article is concerned solely with chemical explosives. ... For other uses, see Fireworks (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Culture

Firecrackers are commonly used in celebration of holidays or festivals, such as Halloween, Independence Day in the United States of America, Diwali in India, Hari Raya in Malaysia, and especially the celebration of Chinese New Year by Chinese communities around the world and Spanish Fallas. Firecrackers are also used by the Vietnamese during their Tết festival especially at midnight Giao Thừa (New Year's Eve). Firecrackers are believed by some to scare off evil spirits and attract the god of wealth to people's doorsteps. In the spring festive period of 2006, US$124 million of fireworks and firecrackers were set off in mainland China. This article is about the holiday. ... Fourth of July redirects here. ... Diwali,or Deepawali, (also called Tihar and Swanti in Nepal) (Markiscarali) is a major Indian and Nepalese festive holiday. ... Hari Raya (Malay for Day of Celebration) is a term used in Malaysia that can apply to the Muslim festivals of Eid ul-Fitr or Eid ul-Adha. ... For other traditions of celebrating lunar new year, see Lunar New Year. ... A Falla prior to being burned Falles (in Catalan/Valencian) or Fallas (in Spanish) is a Valencian tradition which celebrates Saint Josephs Day (March 19th) in Valencia, Spain. ... Tết display in Ho Chi Minh City Tết Nguyên Đán  , more commonly known by its shortened name Tết, is the most important and popular holiday and festival in Vietnam. ... USD redirects here. ... ...


Illegal firecrackers

Firecrackers, as well as other types of explosives, in United States are subject to various laws, depending on location. Firecrackers themselves are not considered illegal contraband material. It is the sale, possession, and use of firecrackers that are subject to laws. Some states or local governments require a permit to legally sell, possess, or use firecrackers; sometimes with different permits for different actions, e.g., a permit required to sell, with a separate permit required to use. [1] Prior to December 6, 1976, the legal limit in the United States for firecrackers was a maximum of 2 grains of blackpowder (130 mg); after this date, the legal limit in the United States was reduced to 50 mg (0.77 grains) of flash powder.


Virtually all firecrackers are scientifically classed as "low explosives" which burn through deflagration, as opposed to "high explosives" such as dynamite and ANFO which actually produce a supersonic detonation wave. Some legal definitions nevertheless define banned firecrackers (such as the M-80 in the United States) as "high explosives"[citation needed]. A log in a fire place. ... This article is about a high explosive. ... ANFO stands for ammonium nitrate/fuel oil (most often diesel fuel, sometimes kerosene or even molasses). ... A United States Navy F/A-18E/F Super Hornet in transonic flight. ... A weapons cache is detonated at the East River Range on Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan Detonation is a process of supersonic combustion in which a shock wave is propagated forward due to energy release in a reaction zone behind it. ... M-80s are a class of large firecrackers, sometimes called salutes. ...


The legal status of firecrackers typically stems from their notable effect on noise pollution as well as the issue of their safety, especially when used by children. Devices which are designed to explode at ground level are seen as more dangerous than those with a prolonged burn time and/or an aerial explosion. Proponents of firecracker sales sometimes question the consistency of these laws, pointing out that legal fireworks can also be dangerous due to the risk of high-temperature burns (as in the case of sparklers), and that projectile fireworks intended for aerial use can often legally incorporate a noise making explosive device as a last stage. Noise pollution (or environmental noise in technical venues) is displeasing human or machine created sound that disrupts the environment. ... For other uses, see Safety (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Categories: Stub | Fireworks ...


In Malaysia, playing with firecrackers is now illegal as stated from Malaysian Explosive Act which was revised in 1991 as a result of the increasing injuries among children (especially Malay) during Hari Raya festive season. Ironically, the injury cases caused by playing firecrackers continue to increase every year since Malay children turned to home-made firecrackers such as bamboo cannons as alternatives to commercial fireworks. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Hari Raya (Malay for Day of Celebration) is a term used in Malaysia that can apply to the Muslim festivals of Eid ul-Fitr or Eid ul-Adha. ... Meriam buluh or bamboo cannon is a type of home-made firecrackers which is popular during Hari Raya festive season in Malaysia. ...


In the Republic of Ireland, firecrackers (commonly called "bangers") are illegal, but they are easily smuggled across the border with Northern Ireland in the weeks leading up to Hallowe'en. Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... Halloween (disambiguation). ...


In Singapore, a partial ban on firecrackers was imposed in March 1970 after a fire killed six people and injured 68.[2] This was extended to a total ban in August 1972, after an explosion that killed two people[3] and an attack on two police officers attempting to stop a group from letting off firecrackers in February 1972.[4] However, in 2003, the government allowed firecrackers to be set off during the festive season. At the Chinese New Year light-up in Chinatown, at the stroke of midnight on the first day of the Lunar New Year, firecrackers are set off under controlled conditions by the Singapore Tourism Board. Other occasions where firecrackers are allowed to be set off are determined by the tourism board or other government organizations. However, they are not allowed to be commercially sold. The Chinatown Heritage Centre at Pagoda Street occupies three shophouses in Chinatown, newly restored to house memories and untold stories of Singapore’s early forefathers. ... The Singapore Tourism Board is a government agency in Singapore, tasked to promote the countrys tourism industry. ... The Singapore Tourism Board is a government agency in Singapore, tasked to promote the countrys tourism industry. ...


Some firecrackers are legal but restrictions are in place regarding the amount of powder they contain. Some examples are: Wolf Pack FireCrackers, Black Cat FireCrackers, China Town FireCrackers, Hydro FireCrackers, and the Wolf Pack Cannon Ball FireCrackers.

Two men dressed as colonial soldiers carry a banner, exploding with firecrackers, commemorating Guy Fawkes and his co-conspirators as part of Lewes Bonfire Night celebrations.
Two men dressed as colonial soldiers carry a banner, exploding with firecrackers, commemorating Guy Fawkes and his co-conspirators as part of Lewes Bonfire Night celebrations.

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1280x853, 237 KB) Lewes Bonfire Night. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1280x853, 237 KB) Lewes Bonfire Night. ... For other uses, see Guido Fawkes (disambiguation). ... This is about Lewes in England. ...

Novelty noise makers

The "party popper" is a plastic tube with a small explosive charge wrapped around a fuse which when pulled causes a loud bang and ejects streamers or confetti. The "snapper" is a few grains of sand covered in AgONC (impact-sensitive silver fulminate) held inside a bit of tissue. When thrown on the ground the AgONC reacts to the impact causing a small bang. In general Novelty Noise Makers are not true firecrackers/fireworks because of the lack of danger or flame, and are legal in many places where fireworks and firecrackers are illegal.


Firecracker brands, packs and labels

Early (pre-1920s) Chinese firecrackers (AKA Mandarin firecrackers) were typically 1/2-inch to 2-inches long, and approximately 1/4-inch in diameter, and were charged with black powder. Mandarin crackers produced a less loud, duller thud when they exploded, compared to modern flash light crackers (which utilize a different explosive composition known as flash powder). Mandarin crackers produced a dimmer, less brilliant flash when they exploded also. Individual Mandarin crackers were most often braided into "strings" of varying lengths, which, when set afire, would explode in rapid sequence. Generally, the strings (sometimes containing as many as several thousand crackers) would be hung from an overhead line or high hook before being ignited. Most Mandarin crackers were coloured all red and did not generally have designs or logos decorating their exterior surface (AKA a "shell wraps"). Occasionally a few yellow and green Mandarin crackers were created and would be braided into the predominantly all red strings, to symbolized the emperor and the ruling class, while the numerous red crackers symbolized the common man. Black powder was the original gunpowder and practically the only known propellant and explosive until the middle of the 19th century. ... Flash powder is a mixture of oxidizer and metallic fuel which burns quickly and if confined will produce a loud report. ...


Once flash powder, which produces a significantly sharper and brighter bang, replaced black powder as a firecracker's explosive charge (in approx. 1924) manufacturers began competing to gain the purchasing loyalty of the consuming public (i.e., mainly boys 8-16 years of age). Literally thousands of brands were created during the flash light cracker's heyday period from the 1920s through the early 1970s. Only a small percentage of brands lasted more than a year or two. Nowadays, collectors actively seek out examples of the various labels which contained the brand name and image associated with that brand. Until very recently (i.e., mid 1980s) firecracker production was a low-tech process. They were entirely handmade, beginning with the operation of rolling thin tubes. Once the firecracker tubes were rolled by hand (most commonly from newspaper) and labelled, and then filled with powder, their ends were crimped and fuses inserted... all by hand. These finished firecrackers were usually braided into "strings" and sold in packs which came in many sizes... from the very small (called "penny packs" containing as few as 4 to 6 firecrackers) to the most common size packs (containing 16 and 20 crackers per pack), to larger packs (containing 24, 30, 32, 40, 50, 60, 72, 90, 100 and 120 firecrackers), to huge "belts" and "rolls" (firecracker packages which contained strings of several hundred to several thousand crackers each). Firecracker packages were typically wrapped in colourful and translucent glassine paper, as well as clear cellophane. Glassine was the most popular, however.


The final packaging operation involved applying a branded pack label on each and every pack and then bundling quantities of finished packs into larger wholesale lots called "bricks" which contained an average of 80 packs each (varying according to the size of the packs being bundled. For example, packs of 32 crackers might only have 40 packs to the brick, compared to packs of 16 or 20 which would have 80 packs to the brick.


Collecting

Some fireworks enthusiasts like to collect firecrackers or firecracker labels. Below is a scale to grade the condition of firecrackers, as this is an important factor used in determining their level of collectability.


Condition-Grading Scale (G/S)

  • 10 (Mint) Factory fresh condition, looks as if just made
  • 9 (Excellent) Close to Mint, with possible minor flaws or wear
  • 8 (Very Good) Minor flaws and wear with possible fading
  • 7 (Good) Acceptable but with noticeable flaws, wear or fading
  • 6 (Fair) Acceptable only as a representation, has distracting flaws, wear, fading
  • 5 (Poor) Unacceptable Condition with extreme flaws, wear or fading

(Flaws may include: Tears, rips, holes, missing pieces, water damaged, powder damaged, price or writing on label, factory stained or blurred graphics, crooked & offset labels, taped, repaired, etc.) [5]


Classifications

  • Class 1 (Pre-1950) "Made in China" is printed on the pack or label. No cautions or warnings will appear. Some Class 1 Packs and Labels may say "Made in Hong Kong" or "Made in Canton".
  • Class 2 (1950-1954) "Made in Macau" is now printed on the pack or label. Still no cautions or warnings will appear on the Pack or Label. Some Class 2 Packs and Labels may say "Made in Portuguese Macau".
  • Class 3 (1955-1968) "Made in Macau" again is printed on these packs and labels They are distinguished by a small box with the words "ICC" or "ICC Class C" on them. Once again no cautions or warnings.
  • Class 4 (1969-1972) "Made in Macau" once again is printed plus the "ICC" or "ICC Class C" designation on them but it will also have the words "Caution: Explosive" with the warning; "Lay on Ground, Light fuse get away. Use under Adult Supervision"
  • Class 5 (1973-1976) "DOT Class C" Common Fireworks is now printed on the Pack or label also with the "Caution: Explosive" etc. Warning on them. Class 5 may say "Made or Repacked in Macau" but usually "Made In China" .
  • Class 6 (1977-1994) Similar to Class 5 "DOT Class C" with the addition of the words "Contains less than 50mg. Flash Powder". It also has the "Caution: Explosive" etc.. Warning. Class 6 will have "Made in China" printed on them.
  • Class 7 (1995-present) These firecrackers are those currently being made today. Packs and labels of this class have the words "UN 0336 1.4G Consumer Fireworks" Now "Warning: Explosive" etc.. appears, again "Made in China".

There are a few exceptions to the aforementioned guidelines, some Firecrackers in class 5, 6, & 7 may say "Made in China" like Class 1, but have the cautions/warnings, etc. Firecrackers larger than 1 1/2", or made for other countries may not conform to the above guidelines). [6]


References

  1. ^ Uncle Sam Fireworks representative
  2. ^ Book soul 1970
  3. ^ Chingay Past
  4. ^ Akbur M., Peer (2002). Policing Singapore in the 19th and 20th centuries. Singapore Police Force, 100. ISBN 981-04-7024-X. 
  5. ^ www.crackerpacks.com guide to collecting firecrackers
  6. ^ www.crackerpacks.com guide to collecting firecrackers
The Jurong Police Division Headquarters at Jurong West Avenue 5. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
firecracker: Definition and Much More from Answers.com (1010 words)
A firecracker (also known as a noisemaker or banger) is a small explosive device primarily designed to produce a large amount of noise, especially in the form of a loud bang; any visual effect is incidental to this goal.
Proponents of firecracker sales sometimes question the consistency of these laws, pointing out that legal fireworks can also be dangerous due to the risk of high-temperature burns (as in the case of sparklers), and that projectile fireworks intended for aerial use can often legally incorporate a noisemaking explosive device as a last stage.
Note that firecrackers are virtually all scientifically classed as "low explosives" which burn through deflagration, as opposed to "high explosives" such as dynamite which actually produce a supersonic detonation wave.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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