FACTOID # 11: Oklahoma has the highest rate of women in State or Federal correctional facilities.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Fire service in the United Kingdom
A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service
A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service

The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational procedures in the light of terrorism attacks and threats. Fire services in the UK are not nationalised, but are generally known as fire and rescue services or FRS in legislation and by government departments.[1]. Many FRS were previously known as brigades, or county fire services, but legislative and administrative changes; and alterations to boundaries has led to the almost universal incorporation of FRS into the name. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (900x771, 230 KB)A Fire Engine of the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (900x771, 230 KB)A Fire Engine of the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service. ... The Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service is the county-wide emergency fire & rescue service for the metropolitan county of Greater Manchester, England. ... The 21st century is the present century of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... Devolution or home rule is the statutory granting of powers from the central government of a state to government at national, regional or local level. ...


A FRS is usually the operational fire fighting body, as distinct from the Fire and Rescue Authority which is the legislative, public and administrative body made up of civilians and councillors that runs the FRS. Prior to the introduction of devolved parliaments and assemblies in the UK, the fire service had been the sole responsibility of the Home Office. [2] There are now many layers of governance including central, devolved and local government; fire brigades, fire and rescue services; and other executive agencies, including Her Majesty's Fire Service Inspectorate (HMFSI), HMFSI Scotland, and the Chief Fire Officers Association, all with a degree of operational, legislative or administrative involvement with the fire service in the UK. A repair locker hose team aboard USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67) combats a controlled fire on the mobile aircraft firefighting training device May 2, 2006. ... In the United Kingdom a Fire Authority or Fire and Rescue Authority is a body or committee which oversees the operation, policy and service delivery of a county or metropolitan fire and rescue service. ... A councillor is a member of a council (such as a city council), particularly in the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia and other parts of the Commonwealth. ... The modern concept of Small Office and Home Office or SoHo , or Small or Home Office deals with the category of business which can be from 1 to 10 workers. ... The Chief Fire Officers Association or CFOA is the professional body representing senior fire officers in the UK. The organisation used to be known as the Chief and Assistant Chief Fire Officers Association, it was formed in 1974 following local government re-structuring. ...

Contents

The need for modernisation

In 2002, Professor Sir George Bain was asked by the government to conduct a wide ranging review of the fire service in the UK. His report, The Independent Review of the Fire Service, led to rapid changes to fire and rescue services, and was the basis of what eventually became the Fire and Rescue Services Act 2004. Bain's terms of reference were described in September 2002 as follows: Professor Sir George Sayers Bain, a Canadian by birth, was President and Vice-Chancellor of Queens University, Belfast, Northern Ireland from 1998[1] to 2004[2]. While not without success, for example in pushing Queens further up the research league table, Bains tenure was dogged by a... This page is a candidate to be copied to Wikisource. ...


"Having regard to the changing and developing role of the Fire Service in the United Kingdom, to inquire into and make recommendations on the future organisation and management of the Fire Service..." [3]


Included in many of the report's headings, and within the text was the word modernisation, but Bain's report was not popular with firefighters, and a long period of industrial action started in 2002 and continued until 2003 with a new pay and conditions package being put together. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


One of the areas identified by Bain as being in need of modernising, was FRS approach to fire prevention and community fire safety. There is now more emphasis on fire prevention and providing public information coupled with encouraging businesses and individuals to take responsibility for providing a risk assessment of businesses - that will become law in October 2006. Additionally, changes to central government, local government, and geographical boundaries have had an impact on the fire service in the UK. Fire safety is a component of Building Safety. ...


The fire service in the UK consists of local authority brigades - or Fire and Rescue Services, often shortened to FRSs; which come under the administrative control of metropolitan and shire, or county fire authorities, for example Essex County Fire and Rescue Service. The London Fire Brigade is unique in having an extra layer of governance in the form of the Greater London Authority that is above the London Fire and Emergency Planning Authority. Local governments are administrative offices of an area smaller than a state. ... The London Fire Brigade (LFB) provides fire fighting and rescue services in London, UK. It is the third largest fire department in the world with nearly 7000 staff. ... The Greater London Authority (GLA) administers the 1579 km² (610 sq. ... Sapient 22:36, 19 February 2006 (UTC) Category: ...


Most statutory firefighting bodies consist of a fire authority, and brigade, the former responsible for political and administrative aspects of service provision. The latter, for delivering it. For example the LFEPA is the authority that runs the London Fire Brigade; Oxfordshire County Council is responsible for Oxfordshire Fire and Rescue Service. Local authorities in the UK have many other responsibilities as well as provision of a fire brigade. The Statute of Grand Duchy of Lithuania A statute is a formal, written law of a country or state, written and enacted by its legislative authority, perhaps to then be ratified by the highest executive in the government, and finally published. ... In military science a brigade is a military unit that is part of a division and includes regiments (where that level exists), or (in modern armies) is composed of several battalions (typically two to four) and directly attached supporting units. ...


Additionally, the armed forces, private fire brigades and airports all make their own firefighting provision. From 2008 onwards, a major project will be rolled out that will reduce the existing 46 fire service control rooms, to nine. It is known as FiReControl and will provide greater coordination between the emergency services. FiReControl is a UK based project to reduce the number of control rooms used to handle emergency calls for fire brigades and authorities. ...


Legislative framework

Legislation

Local authority fire services are established and granted their powers under fairly new legislation, that replaced acts of parliament dating back more than 50 years, but is still undergoing change. In 2002, there was a series of national fire strikes [4], [5], with much of the discontent caused by a report into the British fire service by Professor Sir George Bain. In December 2002, the Independent Review of the Fire Service was published with the industrial action still ongoing; it made radical proposals to how the fire service in the UK should be organised and managed. In Westminster System parliaments, an Act of Parliament is a part of the law passed by the Parliament. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Professor Sir George Sayers Bain, a Canadian by birth, was President and Vice-Chancellor of Queens University, Belfast, Northern Ireland from 1998[1] to 2004[2]. While not without success, for example in pushing Queens further up the research league table, Bains tenure was dogged by a... The Independent Review of the Fire Service, sometimes referred to as the Bain Report or IRFS was a wide-ranging report carried out by Professor Sir George Bain, in 2002, at the request of the government, into the how Fire and Rescue Services were operated and managed; and about the...


Prof Bain's report ultimately led to a change in the law relating to firefighting in the UK, a rough timeline can be seen below:

  • 2006 : The Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2006 [6] This piece of legislation replaces several other acts that dealt with fire precautions and fire safety in premises, including the now defunct process of issuing fire certificates.[7] The DfCLG has published a set of guides for non-domestic premises:[1]
  • 2006 : Fire Safety (Scotland) Regulations 2006
  • 2003: Independent Review of the Fire Service published[9]

There are further plans to modernise the fire service according to the Local Government Association. Its website outlines future changes, and specific projects: For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This page is a candidate to be copied to Wikisource. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... The Greater London Authority Act 1999 (1999 c. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Fire Services Act 1947 (amended 1959) was the primary legislation relating to firefighting operations in the UK from just after the war, until it was repealed and replaced by the Fire and Rescue Services Act 2004 which came about after the Independent Review of the Fire Service in the... The Local Government Assocation is a body for advancing the interests of local authorities in the England and Wales. ...


"The aim of the Fire Modernisation Programme is to adopt modern work practices within the Fire & Rescue Service to become more efficient and effective, while strengthening the contingency and resilience of the Service to react to incidents. "[11]


Select Committee

The fire service in the UK is scrutinised by a House of Commons select committee. In June 2006, the fire and rescue service select committee, under the auspices of the Communities and Local Government Committee, published its latest report. The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... A Select Committee is a committee made up of a small number of parliamentary members appointed to deal with particular areas or issues originating in the Westminster System of parliamentary democracy. ...


Committee report

The committee's brief is described on its website:


The Communities and Local Government Committee is appointed by the House of Commons to examine the expenditure, administration, and policy of the Department for Communities and Local Government and its associated bodies.[12]


Government response

This document, and the subsequent government response[13] in September 2006, are important as they outlined progress on the FiReControl, efforts to address diversity and the planned closure of HMFSI in 2007 among many issues.


Both documents are interesting as they refer back to Professor Bain's report and the many recommendations it made and continue to put forward the notion that there is an ongoing need to modernise FRSs. For example, where FRSs were historically inspected by HMFSI, much of this work is now carried out by the National Audit Office. Categories: United Kingdom-related stubs ...


Fire service ministers

The fire service minister is the most senior politician whose brief directly includes fire and rescue issues, however the function is devolved to the other UK assemblies and parliament. The fire service minister is not part of the Prime Minister's cabinet. The post is held by a junior minister, or Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State who reports to the secretary of state for Communities and Local Government, who takes ultimate responsibility for fire and rescue, but that is part of a much wider brief. A Parliamentary Under Secretary of State, in the United Kingdom government structure, is a minister who is junior to a Minister of State who is then junior to a Secretary of State. ...

  • Ruth Kelly: Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government and Minister for Women
  • Angela Smith: Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for fire DfCLG - a former spokesman for Essex Fire and Rescue

Ruth Maria Kelly (born 9 May 1968) is a British politician. ... Angela Evans Smith (born 7 January United Kingdom. ...

Previous ministers

James Fitzpatrick (born 4 April 1952) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... The Fire Brigades Union (FBU) is the main union for firefighters in the United Kingdom. ... The Right Honourable Wyvill Richard Nicolls Nick Raynsford (born January 28, 1945) was born in Northampton and educated at Repton School and Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge, from which he graduated with a Degree in History in 1966. ... The modern concept of Small Office and Home Office or SoHo , or Small or Home Office deals with the category of business which can be from 1 to 10 workers. ... The Department for Communities and Local Government is a United Kingdom government department. ...

UK fire service structure

Fire and rescue

Central/devolved government

The fire service has always been the ultimate responsibility of a government department, assisted by an executive agency called Her Majesty's Fire Service Inspectorate or HMFSI[14], its website describes its role thus:


"To achieve our vision by education and legislation, in an environment that encourages best practice, equality and diversity, health and safety and best value, and through inspection, to advance the development and continuous improvement of fire brigades."


Directly after the May 2001 general election, control of the fire service in the UK passed from the Home Office to the DTLR - or Department for Transport, Local Government and Regions. This department was then broken up creating the Office of the Deputy Prime Minsister - known as ODPM which took central government responsibility. The Home Office had historically been responsible for the department since 1938 World War II - the National Fire Service brought fire brigades under national control during war time, it was in turn under the auspices of the Civil Defence Service. The Department for Communities and Local Government is a United Kingdom government department. ... Combatants Allied Powers: United Kingdom France Soviet Union United States Republic of China and others Axis Powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Winston Churchill Charles de Gaulle Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Chiang Kai-Shek Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tojo Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33... Civil Defence Services To protect the population against the ill effects of air attack, the Cival Defence was initiated in Britain by the Home Office in 1935. ...


However, in May 2006, the ODPM was re-structured creating the Department for Communities and Local Government or DfCLG, and it became the central government department for fire authorities in England.[15] [16] This has created a layered governance of UK fire brigades and rescue services: The Department for Communities and Local Government is a United Kingdom government department. ...

The Department for Communities and Local Government is a United Kingdom government department. ... The Executives logo, shown with English and Scottish Gaelic caption The term Scottish Executive is used in two different, but closely-related senses: to denote the executive arm of Scotlands national legislature (i. ... The Northern Ireland Assembly is a home rule legislature established in Northern Ireland under the terms of the Good Friday Agreement of 1998, but currently under suspension. ... The National Assembly for Wales (or NAW) (Welsh: Cynulliad Cenedlaethol Cymru) was established in 1998, following a 1997 referendum in which a small majority of voters (but not the electorate) voted in favour of the Labour Governments plans for devolution. ...

Regional government

Below national level, there are regional and local bodies whose role it is to establish a fire authority, implement the legislation from the tier above, while working alongside the relevant HMFSI and other interested bodies.

The next level beneath that of local authority, is a brigade which usually comes under the operational command of a high ranking senior officer. Traditionally Chief Fire Officers, or Fire Masters in Scotland have risen through the ranks from firefighter, although under modernisation plans brigades will eventually be able to offer direct entry, and fast track promotion as is already the case with the armed forces and the police. Chief Fire Officers 'speak' collectively in the UK via the Chief Fire Officers Association. The Greater London Authority (GLA) administers the 1579 km² (610 sq. ... Sapient 22:36, 19 February 2006 (UTC) Category: ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A Fire Master is the highest ranking or commanding officer in a fire service in Scotland. ... The armed forces of a state are its government sponsored defense and fighting forces and organizations. ... The Chief Fire Officers Association or CFOA is the professional body representing senior fire officers in the UK. The organisation used to be known as the Chief and Assistant Chief Fire Officers Association, it was formed in 1974 following local government re-structuring. ...

  • Fire authority: local councillors elected to set policy on its fire and rescue services, and distribute funding, and approve major spending
  • Local authority: Chief executive - overall powers for all an authority's functions, including fire, rescue and resilience
  • Brigade: Chief Fire Officer, Brigade Manager, Fire Master or Commissioner in London - overall operational, strategic and command of a brigade or fire and rescue service

CFOs do attend operational incidents. CFO Roy Wilsher took command at the Hertfordshire oil depot fire at Buncefield, and was part of the gold command team, a CFO would usually be in charge of a fire, or at least the most senior officer in attendance would be. ... It has been suggested that Gold Command be merged into this article or section. ...


FRS or brigade level

Brigades are further sub-divided according to local practice as follows:

  • Command: Large brigades such as the LFB are divided into three commands
  • Area: A brigade or FRS can also be divided into areas - London is a good example because it used to consist of five geographical areas: north west, north, north east, south west and south east
  • Divisional: A smaller geographical area, again it can be decided locally, again London is a good example because until 1986, the LFB consisted of eleven divisions
  • Borough: Brigades are now aligned with local councils, and because of London's size, its three commands also overlap with the London boroughs, so each bourough is a small division. It now has borough teams, [21] and a separate list of stations shows which borough it belongs to. [22]

1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Resilience

The Cabinet Office is responsible for the Civil Contingencies Secretariat, known as the CSS,[23] it provides advice for individuals in case of a major disaster: The Cabinet Office is a department of the Government of the United Kingdom responsible for supporting the Prime Minister and Cabinet in progressing matters that require coordination across Government departments. ... Responsibility for emergency planning in the United Kingdom was transferred from the Home Office to the Cabinet Office in 2001. ...


"The (web)site provides easily understandable guidance for the general public on how to prepare themselves, their families and their homes and businesses to cope during an emergency or disaster."


Any such emergency or disaster is likely to involve a UK FRS, and the generic term for such contingency plans has become known as resilience [24] The 'Preparing for emergencies website' gives specific government advice on fire safety, specific examples include the summer fire safety campaign, and schools' fire safety guide which are just two examples. [25] For the band see Resilience (band) Resilience generally means the ability to recover from (or to resist being affected by) some shock, insult, or disturbance. ...


Fire service funding

In the UK, a FRS generally provides its services for free, although there are some special services that can be charged for, and some additional services that can be paid for. The service is free to the end user in the case of an emergency.


Funding for the fire service comes from two principal sources. Taking one random example, Wolverhampton City Council, in England has published details of its budget and council tax for the financial year 2006 to 2007 in an online statement from its leader. [26] Wolverhampton is a city and metropolitan borough in the West Midlands, England, traditionally part of the county of Staffordshire. ... The Council Tax is the main form of local taxation in England, Scotland and Wales. ...


Precept

The document above refers to a 4.8% increase in the fire precept; this is simply an amount of money collected by a local authority, from individuals, via their council tax which goes towards the cost of funding the FRS. The precept is paid to the fire authority that covers the council area - in this case it is the West Midlands Fire Authority. But a fire authority is generally bigger than a borough or small city council. Where there are several boroughs, as in the case of London, the precept collected from each borough will be paid to the fire authority. A borough is an administrative division used in various countries. ...


West Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service mentioned specifically the precept in it budget settlement for 2006. [27] The FRS is clearly telling its service users how much they will have to pay towards running the fire service.


Grant settlement

The remainder of FRS funding comes from a central government grant settlement paid to each fire authority. Each FRS has to negotiate its own grant according to size and demands on its services.


Modernisation

Prof Bain's report highlighted many areas of proposed change that include working practices, shift hours and time spent on fire prevention duties. One of the proposals which is now well under way is the reduction of fire service control rooms.


FiReControl

At present, each of England's 46 fire and rescue services handles their own calls from the 999 system. The FiReControl project is building nine new purpose built control rooms known as Regional Control Centres or RCCs. The aim is to rationalise call handling, and aim for greater communication between the emergency services. There has been some suggestion that this could pave the way for regionalised fire and rescue services. [citation needed] FiReControl is a UK based project to reduce the number of control rooms used to handle emergency calls for fire brigades and authorities. ... 999 is the United Kingdoms and Irelands emergency telephone number and Polands medical emergency number. ...


At present, calls from the 999 system - whether by mobile telephone or landline are answered by a BT operator, who feeds the call to fire, police or ambulance, or other emergency service. Staff who answer these calls also despatch the fire appliances (engines), maintain radio communications and provide detailed risk and geographical information. BT Group plc (formerly British Telecommunications plc) which trades as BT (also previously as British Telecom and is still commonly known as such amongst the general public) is the privatised UK state telecommunications operator. ...


These operators are employed by a FRS, they are known as Control Officers, or informally Con Offs, and they wear a similar uniform to firefighters, and have a their own rank structure. The role of specialist fire officers and control officers overlaps where they jointly work in control or command centres.


UK fire and rescue services

England

Avon Fire and Rescue Service [2]
Bedfordshire and Luton Fire and Rescue Service [3]
Royal Berkshire Fire and Rescue Service [4]
Buckinghamshire Fire and Rescue Service [5]
Cambridgeshire Fire and Rescue Service [6]
Cheshire Fire and Rescue Service [7]
Cleveland Fire Brigade [8]
Cornwall County Fire Brigade [9]
County Durham and Darlington Fire and Rescue Service [10]
Cumbria Fire & Rescue Service [11]
Derbyshire Fire and Rescue Service [12]
Devon Fire & Rescue Service [13]
Dorset Fire and Rescue Service [14]
East Sussex Fire and Rescue Service [15]
Essex County Fire and Rescue Service [16]
Gloucestershire Fire and Rescue Service [17]
Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service [18]
Hampshire Fire and Rescue Service [19]
Hereford and Worcester Fire and Rescue Service [20]
Hertfordshire Fire & Rescue Service [21]
Humberside Fire and Rescue Service [22]
Isle of Wight Fire & Rescue Service [23]
Kent Fire and Rescue Service [24]
Lancashire Fire and Rescue Service [25]
Leicestershire Fire & Rescue Service [26]
Lincolnshire Fire & Rescue Service [27]
London Fire Brigade [28] LFEPA
Merseyside Fire and Rescue Service [29]
Norfolk Fire & Rescue Service [30]
Northamptonshire Fire & Rescue Service [31]
Northumberland Fire and Rescue Service [32]
North Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service [33]
Nottinghamshire Fire & Rescue Service [34]
Oxfordshire Fire and Rescue Service [35]
Shropshire Fire & Rescue Service [36]
Somerset Fire and Rescue Service [37]
South Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service [38]
Staffordshire Fire & Rescue Service [39]
Suffolk Fire & Rescue Service [40]
Surrey Fire and Rescue Service [41]
Tyne and Wear Fire and Rescue Service [42]
Warwickshire Fire and Rescue Service [43]
West Midlands Fire Service [44]
West Sussex Fire and Rescue Service [45]
West Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service [46]
Wiltshire Fire and Rescue Service [47]
  • See also: Fire Gateway clickable map of fire and rescue services in England [48]

Temple Back Fire Station and Service HQ The Avon Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory FRS or Fire and Rescue Service covering the area of what used to be the County of Avon (1974-1996) but now consists of the four unitary authorities of Bath and North East Somerset... Bedfordshire and Luton Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory Fire and Rescue Service (FRS) for the county of Bedfordshire and the unitary authority of Luton. ... The Royal Berkshire Fire and Rescue Service is a statutory fire and rescue service covering the area of the ceremonial county of Berkshire in England. ... Buckinghamshire (abbreviated Bucks) is one of the home counties in South East England. ... Cambridgeshire (abbreviated Cambs) is a county in England, bordering Lincolnshire to the north, Norfolk to the northeast, Suffolk to the east, Essex and Hertfordshire to the south, and Bedfordshire and Northamptonshire to the west. ... The Cheshire Fire and Rescue Service is the statuory fire and rescue service for the English non-metropolitan county of Cheshire and the unitary authorities of Halton (including Runcorn, and Widnes) and Warrington. ... Status: Non-metropolitan county Admin. ... Cornwall (Cornish: Kernow) is a county in South West England, United Kingdom, on the peninsula that lies to the west of the River Tamar. ... County Durham Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue service covering an area of 623,260 acres, for Darlington and County Durham. ... Cumbria is a county in the North West region of England. ... Derbyshire Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue service covering the area of Derbyshire, England // The service was formed as a result of the Fire Services Act 1947. ... Devon is a large county in South West England, bordered by Cornwall to the west, Dorset and Somerset to the east. ... Dorset Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue service for the area of Dorset, south-west England. ... The East Sussex Fire & Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue service for the county of East Sussex and city of Brighton and Hove. ... Essex County Fire and Rescue Service are the statutory fire fighting service for the county of Essex in the south-east of England. ... The Gloucestershire Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory emergency fire and rescue service for the county of Gloucestershire, England. ... The Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service is the county-wide emergency fire & rescue service for the metropolitan county of Greater Manchester, England. ... Hampshire Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue service for the area of Hampshire, on the south coast of England. ... The Hereford and Worcester Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue service covering Herefordshire and Worcestershire in the West Midlands region of England. ... Hertfordshire (pronounced Hartfordshire and abbreviated as Herts) is an inland county in the United Kingdom and part of the East of England Government Office region. ... Humberside Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue service for Humberside, England. ... The Isle of Wight is an English island and county, off the southern English coast, to the south of the county of Hampshire. ... Kent Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue service for the county of Kent covering a geographical area south of London, to the coast and including major shipping routes via the Thames and Medway rivers. ... The Lancashire Fire and Rescue Service is the county-wide, statutory emergency fire and rescue service for the Shire county of Lancashire, England. ... Leicestershire (IPA: , abbreviated Leics) is a landlocked county in central England. ... Lincolnshire (abbreviated Lincs) is a county in the east of England. ... The London Fire Brigade (LFB) provides fire fighting and rescue services in London, UK. It is the third largest fire department in the world with nearly 7000 staff. ... Sapient 22:36, 19 February 2006 (UTC) Category: ... Merseyside Fire and Rescue Service Is the fire service covering the county of Merseyside in north-west England and is the statutory firfighting and rescue service responsible for all 999 fire brigade calls in Sefton, Knowsley, St Helens, Liverpool and Wirral. ... Norfolk (pronounced IPA: ) is a low-lying county in East Anglia in the east of southern England. ... Northamptonshire (abbreviated Northants or Nhants) is a landlocked county in central England with a population of 629,676 (2001 census). ... Northumberland Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue service which covers the area of Northumberland, England. ... North Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue service covering the area of Scarborough, Hambleton, Ryedale, Selby, York, Richmondshire, Craven and Harrogate; therefore dividing the service into 8 groups. ... Nottinghamshire (abbreviated Notts) is an English county in the East Midlands, which borders South Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Derbyshire. ... The Oxfordshire Fire and Rescue Service, is the Fire Service serving the county of Oxfordshire. ... Shropshire (alternatively Salop or abbreviated Shrops) is an English county in the West Midlands region of the United Kingdom. ... The Somerset Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory FRS or Fire and Rescue Service covering the area of Somerset. ... South Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue service for the area of South Yorkshire, England. ... Staffordshire (abbreviated Staffs) is a landlocked county in the West Midlands region of England. ... Suffolk (pronounced ) is a large historic and modern non-metropolitan county in the East Anglia region of eastern England. ... The Surrey Fire and Rescue Service is the statuory fire & rescue service for the County of Surrey, England, with 24 fire stations. ... View of a Tyne and Wear Volvo Fire Appliance. ... Warwickshire Fire and Rescue Service is the statutary fire and rescue service covering Warwickshire in the West Midlands region of England. ... The West Midlands Fire Service is the statutory fire and rescue service responsible for fire protection, prevention, intervention and emergency rescue in the West Midlands county in England. ... The West Sussex Fire and Rescue Service is statutory fire and rescue service for the county of West Sussex, England. ... The West Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service is the county-wide, statutory emergency fire and rescue service for the Metropolitan county of West Yorkshire, England. ... The Wiltshire Fire and Rescue Service is the county-wide, statutory emergency fire and rescue service for the ceremonial county of Wiltshire, England. ...

Northern Ireland

Northern Ireland Fire & Rescue Service [49]

Location of NIFB districts The Northern Ireland Fire Brigade (NIFB) are the official fire fighters for Northern Ireland, United Kingdom. ...

Scotland

The Scottish brigades are still broadly based on the system of regions introduced in 1975. Fire authorities are now joint boards. The nine Regions of Scotland were established under the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 as the uppermost tier of local government in Scotland. ...

Brigade Council Areas (if different from brigade name)
Central Scotland Fire and Rescue Service [50] Clackmannanshire, Falkirk, Stirling
Dumfries and Galloway Fire and Rescue Service
Fife Fire and Rescue Service
Grampian Fire and Rescue Service Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Moray
Highlands and Islands Fire and Rescue Service Highland, Orkney, Shetland, Na h-Eileanan Siar (Western Isles)
Lothian and Borders Fire and Rescue Service East Lothian, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scottish Borders, West Lothian
Strathclyde Fire and Rescue Argyll and Bute, East Ayrshire,

East Dunbartonshire, East Renfrewshire, Glasgow, Inverclyde, North Ayrshire, North Lanarkshire, Renfrewshire, South Ayrshire, South Lanarkshire, West Dunbartonshire Map of Scotland showing the location of the former Central region Regional Council Central (Roinn Meadhanach in Gaelic) was a local government region of Scotland from 1974 to 1995. ... Look Aboot Ye Clackmannanshire (Siorrachd Chlach Mhannainn in Gaelic) is one of the 32 council areas of Scotland, and a lieutenancy area, bordering Perth and Kinross, Stirling and Fife. ... Falkirk (an Eaglais Bhreac in Gaelic) is one of the 32 council areas in Scotland. ... Stirling (Sruighlea in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland with a population of about 85,000. ... Dumfries and Galloway Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue sercvice for the area of Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland. ... Fife Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue service for the area of Fife, Scotland, its Chief Fire Officer is Danny ODonnell. ... Grampian Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue service for the area of Grampian, Scotland. ... City of Aberdeen crest City of Aberdeen (Mòr-bhaile Obar Dheathain in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland. ... Aberdeenshire (Siorrachd Obar Dheathain in Gaelic) is one of the 32 unitary council areas in Scotland. ... Moray (Moireibh in Gaelic), one of the 32 unitary council regions (or areas) of Scotland, lies in the north-east of the country and borders on the regions of Aberdeenshire and Highland. ... The Highlands and Islands Fire and Rescue Service (previously Highland and Islands Fire Brigade) is the fire service for Northern Scotland, covering the council areas of Highland, Orkney, Shetland, and the Western Isles, and so covering a major part of the Highlands and Islands area. ... The Highland unitary authority area (Roinn na Gàidhealtachd in Gaelic) is a local government area in the Scottish Highlands and the largest local government area in Scotland. ... Orkney (sometimes known as the Orkney Islands) is an archipelago in northern Scotland, situated 10 miles north of the coast of Caithness. ... Shetland (formerly spelled Zetland, from etland) formerly called Hjaltland, is one of 32 council areas of Scotland. ... The Western Isles are an archipelago in Scotland. ... Lothian and Borders Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue service covering a total area 2,500 square miles and serving a total population of 890,000. ... East Lothian (Lodainn an Ear in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council areas in Scotland, and a lieutenancy Area. ... City of Edinburgh (Mòr-bhaile Dhùn Èideann in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland. ... The central portions of the old province of Lothian in Scotland, centred around Edinburgh, became known as Midlothian, Scotland. ... West Lothian or Linlithgowshire (Lodainn an Iar in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland, and a Lieutenancy area. ... Strathclyde Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue service for the area of Strathclyde, Scotland, it is the largest fire and rescue service in the Scotland, and one of the largest in Europe. ... Argyll and Bute (Earra-Ghaidheal agus Bòd in Gaelic) is both one of 32 unitary council areas; and a Lieutenancy Area in Scotland. ... Logo of East Ayrshire Council East Ayrshire (Siorrachd Inbhir Àir an Ear in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland. ... East Dunbartonshire (Siorrachd Dhùn Bhreatainn an Ear in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary authority areas in Scotland. ... East Renfrewshire (Siorrachd Rinn Friù an Ear in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland. ... The City of Glasgow Council (Mòr-bhaile Ghlaschu in Gaelic) is one of the 32 Scottish unitary authorities, formerly Glasgow District Council and Glasgow Corporation in Glasgow, Scotland. ... Inverclyde (Inbhir Chluaidh in Gaelic) is one of 32 council areas in Scotland. ... North Ayrshire (Siorrachd Inbhir Àir a Tuath in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland. ... North Lanarkshire (Siorrachd Lannraig a Tuath in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland. ... Renfrewshire (Siorrachd Rinn Friù in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary authority regions in Scotland. ... South Ayrshire (Siorrachd Inbhir Àir a Deas in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland, covering the southern part of Ayrshire. ... South Lanarkshire (Siorrachd Lannraig a Deas in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland, covering the southern part of the traditional county of Lanarkshire. ... West Dunbartonshire (Siorrachd Dhùn Bhreatainn an Iar in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary authority areas in Scotland. ...

Tayside Fire Brigade Angus, Dundee, Perth and Kinross
  • See also Fire Master for more information about chief fire officers in Scotland

Tayside (Taobh Tatha in Gaelic) was a local government region of Scotland from 1974 to 1995. ... Angus (Aonghas in Gaelic) is one of the 32 local government council areas of Scotland, and a lieutenancy area. ... City of Dundee (Mòr-bhaile Dhùn Dèagh in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland. ... Perth and Kinross (Peairt agus Ceann Rois in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council areas in Scotland, and a Lieutenancy Area. ... A Fire Master is the highest ranking or commanding officer in a fire service in Scotland. ...

Wales

Brigade Principal areas covered
Mid and West Wales Fire Brigade Carmarthenshire, Ceredigion, Neath Port Talbot, Pembrokeshire, Powys Swansea
North Wales Fire & Rescue Service Anglesey, Conwy, Denbighshire, Flintshire, Gwynedd, Wrexham
South Wales Fire & Rescue Service Blaenau Gwent, Bridgend, Caerphilly, Cardiff, Merthyr Tydfil, Monmouthshire, Newport, Rhondda Cynon Taff, Torfaen, Vale of Glamorgan.

Wales saw a reduction in the number of fire brigades in 1996, from 8 (the number of former administrative counties) to 3, made up of groups of the new principal areas. For local government purposes, Wales is divided into 22 unitary authorities. ... Mid and West Wales is a subdivision of Wales that is sometimes used, consisting broadly of the preserved counties of Dyfed and Powys, sometimes Swansea. ... Carmarthenshire (Welsh: ) is a county in Wales. ... For other uses please see Ceredigion (disambiguation) Ceredigion is a county in Wales. ... Neath Port Talbot (Welsh: ) is a county borough in Glamorgan, south Wales. ... Pembrokeshire (Welsh: Sir Benfro) is a county in the southwest of Wales in the United Kingdom. ... Powys is a local government principal area and a preserved county in Wales. ... Swansea (Welsh: , mouth of the Tawe) is a city in Wales and a Welsh County. ... Approximate extent of North Wales North Wales (known in some archaic texts as Northgalis) is the northernmost unofficial region of Wales, bordered to the south by Mid Wales. ... Anglesey (Welsh: , pronounced (IPA)), is an island and county at the northwestern extremity of Wales. ... Conwy [county borough] is a local government principal area in north Wales. ... Denbighshire (Welsh: Sir Ddinbych) is a county in North Wales. ... Flintshire (Welsh: ) is a principal area and county in north-east Wales. ... Gwynedd is an administrative county in Wales, named after the old Kingdom of Gwynedd. ... Wrexham is a county borough in northern Wales. ... Approximate extent of South Wales South Wales (Welsh: ) is an area of Wales bordered by England and the Bristol Channel to the east and south, and Mid Wales and West Wales to the north and west. ... Blaenau Gwent is a county borough and parliamentary constituency in South Wales. ... Bridgend is a county borough in what was the traditional county of Glamorgan, southern Wales. ... Caerphilly [county borough] is a local government principal area in southern Wales, straddling the boundary between the traditional counties of Glamorgan and Monmouthshire. ... Cardiff (English:  Welsh: ) is the capital, largest and core city of Wales. ... Merthyr Tydfil (Welsh: ) is a town and county borough in Wales, with a population of about 55,000. ... Monmouthshire (Welsh: Sir Fynwy) is both a principal area and a traditional county in south-east Wales. ... For other uses, see Newport (disambiguation). ... Rhondda Cynon Taff (Welsh: Rhondda Cynon T f) is a county borough in Glamorgan, South Wales. ... Torfaen (sometimes hyphenated Tor-faen) is a county borough in South Wales. ... For other uses, see Vale of Glamorgan (disambiguation). ...


Other UK fire and rescue services / Non Local Authorty / Non Georgraphical Services

There are several specialised and private FRS's in the United Kingdom


The British Airports Authority Fire Service

Airport Fire Services in the UK protect all categories of airports and aerodromes. They are usually referred to as "RFFS" (Rescue and Firefighting Services)


One of the biggest Aviation related Fire Services is that operated by the British Airports Authority BAA plc is the owner and operator of seven major United Kingdom airports and operator of several airports worldwide, making the company one of the largest transport companies in the world. ...


Other non BAA airports operate their own fire services to comply with legislation which states that airports must be provided with RFFS (Rescue and Firefighting Services)


The Ministry of Defence Fire Service

The MoD operates its own fire service. Originally this consisted of a civillian fire service known as the "Defence Fire Service" and the RAF Firefighting and Rescue Service. They both were known collectively as the Ministry of Defence Fire Services, but for simplification they are now all referred to as the MoDFS. This also includes private contractors brought in to protect small Defence Establishment sites etc. Look up mod in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


The MoDFS It is the largest non geographial / Local Authority Brigade in the UK and the training, rank structure and equipment used are similar to that operated by their local authority fire service counterparts.


As a general rule the RAF Fire Service covered runways / airfields with particular expertise in diffusing aircraft munitions.


The civillian Defence Fire Service covered domestic sites, but there were cross overs and both services cold be called to airfield and domestic situations


Both RAF and Defence personnel can serve abroad both in peace time and at war.


Private and industrial FRS

Some large factories operate their private or industrail fire services to protect their own intrests and provide a first attack capability until Local Authorty Crews can arrive and assist at an incident.


Ford and Pfizer both operate industrial fire crews, and there are many others.


BNFL

British Nuclear Fuels and other Nucler Power Station operators provide their own on site Fire Services.


Ports

Several Large ports have their own fire servicew such as the Port of Felixstowe Felixstowe is a North Sea seaport in Suffolk, England. ...


Event fire safety services

Several Private Event Fire Safety units have popped up across the UK at major events such as air shows, regattas, concerts etc - they are run mainly by off duty fire fighters and emergency personnel to provide fire cover at major outdoor events. The cover normally consists of one or two standard fire appliances with perhaps a rapid response / control vehicle.


Fire services protecting royal interests

Several properties owned by the royal family are protected by their own mini Fire Services in the intrests of protecting site of heritage and Royal importance.


History

Legislation for the provision of firefighting dates back to 1865 when the Metropolitan Fire Brigade Act was passed, this took the responsibility of firefighting away from the insurance companies. However the legal requirement for local authority fire brigades, came about with the passing of the Fire Brigades Act 1938 - at the time there were about 1600 brigades throughout the UK.[28] During the Second World War the many local authority fire brigades had been merged to form a single National Fire Service. After the war, in 1948, under the Fire Services Act 1947, fire was restored to local authority as before, but to the county councils and county boroughs rather than the smaller areas that had previously existed. The Fire Brigades Act 1938 was the primary legislation for the UK, excluding London that placed reponsibility for the provision of a fire brigade on to the local authority, and away from the insurance companies. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... The National Fire Service (NFS) was the single united countrywide fire service created in the United Kingdom during the Second World War. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... The Fire Services Act 1947 (amended 1959) was the primary legislation relating to firefighting operations in the UK from just after the war, until it was repealed and replaced by the Fire and Rescue Services Act 2004 which came about after the Independent Review of the Fire Service in the...


The number of fire brigades was subsequently reduced again by mergers in 1974/1975 and in 1986. 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In Scotland the brigades from 1948-1975 covered generally groups of counties and were Angus, Central, Fife, Glasgow, North Eastern, Perth and Kinross, South Eastern, South Western, Western.


References

  1. ^ Department for Communities and Local govt: Fire and Resilience (accessed 08 Dec 06)
  2. ^ National Archives, NDAD, Home Office, Accessed 25 Sep 2006
  3. ^ Independent Review of the Fire Service, online press release 20 Sep 2002, Independent review starts into pay and modernisation of the Fire Service, Accessed 25 Sep 2006
  4. ^ BBC News: countdown to fire strike 13 Nov 2002
  5. ^ BBC News: in pictures, Fire Strike in London 14 Nov 2002
  6. ^ The Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005, England & Wales
  7. ^ The Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 England & Wales, Schedule 4
  8. ^ Fire & Rescue Services Act 2004, Pub: The Stationery Office, Crown copyright
  9. ^ Independent Review of the Fire Service, by Prof Sir George Bain, Pub: ODPM, 16 December 2002
  10. ^ Dept for Communities and Local Govt, Fire and resilience, 2006
  11. ^ LGA: Fire Service Modernisation
  12. ^ House of Commons Communities & Local Govt Committee Fire & Rescue Service, Fourth Report of Session 2005–06, Volume I: introduction
  13. ^ Government Response to the Communities & Local Government Committee’s Report on the Fire and Rescue Service, 29 September 2006, TSO
  14. ^ Dept for Communities and Local Govt, HMFSI
  15. ^ Dept for Communities and Local Govt
  16. ^ HM Government: Fire Gateway
  17. ^ HMFSI: Scottish Executive
  18. ^ Northern Ireland Assembly
  19. ^ Northern Ireland Fire and Rescue Service
  20. ^ Welsh Assembly Government: Fire
  21. ^ LFEPA London Fire Brigade, Borough teams
  22. ^ LFEPA London Fire Brigade A to Z of fire stations
  23. ^ HM Government, Cabinet Office/CSS 'Preparing for Emergencies'
  24. ^ HM Government, Cabinet Office: UK Resilience
  25. ^ HM Government, 'Preparing for emergencies', Fire Safety
  26. ^ Wolverhampton City Council: Leader's statement - budget and council tax 2006/07 Released: Tuesday 21st February, 2006
  27. ^ West Yorshire Fire and Rescue Service: Online press release, 17 Feb 2006, Four pence a week rise in fire precept
  28. ^ London Fire Brigade: Key Dates, (accessed 29 Jan 2007)

See also

Blues and twos is a colloquial term that refers to the blue flashing lights and two-tone sirens that the Emergency Services in the UK use when responding to an incident. ... The London Fire Brigade (LFB) provides fire fighting and rescue services in London, UK. It is the third largest fire department in the world with nearly 7000 staff. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

External links

  • The Fire Service College
  • Her Majesty's Fire Service Inspectorate
  • Her Majesty's Fire Service Inspectorate for Scotland
  • UK Fire Service urbans search and rescue dog teams
  • Fire Service
  • Chief Fire Officers' Association
  • UK Fire News
Fire services around the world

France · Germany · Hong Kong · Singapore · Macao · New Zealand · United Kingdom This article discusses national trends and protocol in fire fighting. ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... Dennis Sabre. ... A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational...


 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m