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Encyclopedia > Fire Emblem
Wallpaper featuring Eliwood, Hector and Lyn from Fire Emblem, the first Fire Emblem game to be released internationally.
Wallpaper featuring Eliwood, Hector and Lyn from Fire Emblem, the first Fire Emblem game to be released internationally.

Fire Emblem (ファイアーエムブレム Faiā Emuburemu?) is a tactical role-playing games franchise developed by Intelligent Systems (specifically Shouzou Kaga),[1] the makers of Advance Wars (which shares some of Fire Emblem's strategic elements), and published by Nintendo Co., Ltd. The Fire Emblem series is well-known for its innovation and for introducing the first tactical role-playing game, with a strong emphasis on Western forms of medieval folklore. The series is also renowned for having deeply developed characters, as well as the fact that most units' death—or defeat in battle—is permanent in the game until the end of the playthrough.[2] The series currently spans ten games, and has been released on the Famicom, Super Famicom, Game Boy Advance, GameCube and Wii.[3] A Fire Emblem game was announced for the Nintendo DS in October 2007; [4] it is a remake of the first game, Fire Emblem: Ankoku Ryū to Hikari no Tsurugi, and will be the first Fire Emblem game to have online features.[5] Fire Emblem, released in Japan as Fire Emblem: Rekka no Ken , lit. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 160 KB) Summary Eliwood, Hector and Lyn. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 160 KB) Summary Eliwood, Hector and Lyn. ... A tactical role-playing game (usually simply called tactical RPG, sometimes referred to as strategy role-playing game or SRPG) is a type of computer role-playing game (CRPG) in which the focus of the gameplay is on making tactical decisions in battles. ... This article covers the game developer. ... Shouzou Kaga is a video game designer that once worked for Intelligent Systems. ... Nintendo Wars (Japanese: ファミコンウォーズ Famicom Wars) is a series of military turn-based strategy video games (See wargame), developed by Intelligent Systems and published by Nintendo. ... Nintendo Company, Limited (任天堂 or ニンテンドー Nintendō; NASDAQ: NTDOY, TYO: 7974 usually referred to as simply Nintendo, or Big N ) is a multinational corporation founded on September 23, 1889[1] in Kyoto, Japan by Fusajiro Yamauchi to produce handmade hanafuda cards. ... A tactical role-playing game (usually simply called tactical RPG, sometimes referred to as strategy role-playing game or SRPG) is a type of computer role-playing game (CRPG) in which the focus of the gameplay is on making tactical decisions in battles. ... For this articles equivalent regarding the East, see Eastern culture. ... Byzantine monumental Church mosaics are a crowning glory of Medieval Art. ... “NES” redirects here. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ... “GBA” redirects here. ... The Nintendo GameCube (GCN) is Nintendos fourth home video game console, belonging to the sixth generation era. ... The Wii (pronounced as the pronoun we, IPA: ) is the fifth home video game console released by Nintendo. ... NDS redirects here. ... (NOTE: Some release dates listed are not global release dates. ...


Fire Emblem, the seventh title in the series, became the first to see an international release in 2003,[6] largely due to the popularity of Fire Emblem characters Marth and Roy's appearances in Super Smash Bros. Melee.[7] Released outside of Japan simply as Fire Emblem, the game was designed specifically with newcomers to the series in mind, and the first ten chapters were structured in a manner that eased newcomers into the gameplay.[8] All Fire Emblem titles produced since have also seen international release.[3] Fire Emblem, released in Japan as Fire Emblem: Rekka no Ken , lit. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Marth ) is a character from the Fire Emblem series of video games. ... Roy (ロイ Roi) is a fictional swordfighter from the Fire Emblem series of video games. ... Super Smash Bros. ...

Contents

Gameplay

Basics

Game-play map screen from Fire Emblem: Thracia 776
Game-play map screen from Fire Emblem: Thracia 776

The Fire Emblem series is a series of turn-based tactics games that involve moving units through a map grid in order to defeat the opposition and eventually complete a mission objective such as seizing a base,[8] surviving for a number of turns, or defeating a boss. Many conventions of traditional console role-playing games are also present; for example, the player may spend money to buy weapons and special items from shops, visit villages and towns, engage in conversations with NPCs or enemy characters, and transfer equipment between characters.[9] Depending on the game, these actions may take place during or in-between battles. Image File history File links Fire Emblem: Thracia 776 Chapter 1 Screencap with devices used on SNES for Thracia 776 This is a screenshot of a copyrighted computer game or video game. ... Image File history File links Fire Emblem: Thracia 776 Chapter 1 Screencap with devices used on SNES for Thracia 776 This is a screenshot of a copyrighted computer game or video game. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and make it easier to understand, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Flag Ship from the video game Gorf A boss is an enemy-based challenge in video games that, once encountered, stops the games progression until the player is able either to surmount the enemy or is thwarted by it. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... An NPC from the video game The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion. ...


The combat system bases itself on a rock-paper-scissors method of fighting,[2] as each weapon type has both an advantage and a disadvantage against other types. From Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu to the most recent game, Fire Emblem: Radiant Dawn, the weapon triangle has been lance beats sword, sword beats axe, and axe beats lance.[10] Bows are unaffected by the triangle, can attack from a distance, and do higher amounts of damage against flying units like pegasi and wyverns,[2] but this is offset by the bow-wielder's inability to counter-attack direct melee strikes. A similar trinity of magic, that varies from game to game, has also existed. In the Game Boy Advance Fire Emblem games, light beats dark, dark beats anima, and anima beats light.[11] In other games, fire beats wind, wind beats thunder, and thunder beats fire. Magic is also unique in that magical attacks can be used from either a distance or in melee range. Rock, Paper, Scissors chart Listen to this article ( info/dl) This audio file was created from an article revision dated 2006-07-13, and may not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... This article is in need of attention. ... The term lance has become a catchall for a variety of different pole weapons based on the spear. ... Swiss longsword, 15th or 16th century Look up Sword in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Axe For other uses, see Axe (disambiguation). ... This article is about the projectile weapon bow. ... Pegasus and Bellerophon, Attic red-figure Pegasus and Bellerophon, from Mabie, Hamilton Wright (Ed. ... For other uses, see Wyvern (disambiguation). ...


Unlike in most other games, most weapons in the Fire Emblem series have a finite number of uses and will eventually break. Therefore, the player must often buy replacement weapons or spend gold to have broken weapons repaired.[8] Typically, weaker weapons such as the low-tier iron weapons allow more uses than the more powerful steel and silver weapons.


Units

Unlike in Advance Wars and other tactical RPGs such as Final Fantasy Tactics, player-generated units are absent. Instead, Fire Emblem utilizes a distinct cast of characters, each belonging to one of many character classes and having a personality and past of his or her own.[2] Typically, the size of the player's character roster is very small at the beginning of each game, but as progress is made, other units may join the player's party through story events or through actions taken. The latter games in the series typically contain playable rosters between thirty and fifty characters deep.[12] Advance Wars is a turn-based tactics video game developed for the Game Boy Advance by Intelligent Systems and published by Nintendo in 2001. ... Final Fantasy Tactics ) is a tactical role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) for the Sony PlayStation video game console. ... This article is about a concept in role-playing games. ...


Using units in battle will allow them to gain experience points; a character's level will increase upon gaining one hundred experience points. Leveling up party members can be a challenge, as many newly recruited units arrive with inferior levels and statistics,[13] but because the amount of experience earned from defeating an enemy is determined by the level discrepancy between the battling units, characters at lower levels earn more experience than higher-leveled characters when defeating enemies of comparable level. In addition to statistics, units have a weapon rank for each type of weapon they can use; these run from E (lowest) to S (highest). In the most recent game, Radiant dawn, it is possible to achieve an SS weapon level, which is one level higher than S.[14] Units can only use weapons whose rank is equal to or lower than their own, but weapon ranks can be increased by repeatedly using weapons of that type. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


As characters level up, they may gain the ability to change to a more powerful character class, often referred to as "promotion." Depending on the mechanics of the particular game, characters may promote upon reaching a certain level,[2] or through the use of special items that instantly cause promotion. Major characters may automatically promote during story events. Characters that promote receive a one-time statistics upgrade that is higher than the average leveling upgrade and additional abilities that are standards of the higher-tier classes. This article is about the field of statistics. ...


Supports

Romance and friendship are prevalent themes throughout the Fire Emblem series. Starting from the sixth game, Fūin no Tsurugi,[15] this characteristic has been further emphasized in the gameplay itself through the use of support conversations. In the GBA Fire Emblem titles, these conversations can be triggered by having specific pairs of characters end their turns standing next to each other. After a specific number of turns have accumulated, the player is given the option to view a support conversation between the two characters; this process can occur up to three times.[12] Path of Radiance altered the approach by requiring characters to be in a certain number of battles together and not necessarily adjacent to one another.[16] Characters who support each other receive statistical bonuses, based on support level and each character's elemental affinity, that activate any time they are within three spaces of each other on the battlefield.[12] If two characters with a mutual romantic attraction, strong friendship, or other form of mutual connection engage in three support conversations throughout the game, the result will sometimes affect the game's ending.[17] Depending on the characters involved, such results could include marriage, a deepening of friendship, or a continued pursuit of their ongoing relationship.


Death

Fire Emblem characters that run out of hit points die and cannot be brought back to life in game.[2] This also affects recruitable NPC and enemy units. If a player wishes to continue using a character or to recruit a would-be playable unit that has been killed, then the player must restart that chapter from the beginning. In addition, a "Game Over" occurs whenever one of the main characters falls, or in other situations depending on a mission's requirements. Only under special circumstances, such as being significantly related to the story, will characters who have fallen in battle not actually die, though the player will still be unable to use them in further battles.[9] In extremely rare situations, characters that fall in battle can become playable at a later point in the game. For example, in Fire Emblem, the game is split into two parts, Lyn's tale and Eliwood's (or Hector's) tale; all characters from Lyn's tale are recruited again in the second part of the game, whether or not they survived the first part. This is a character guide for the Game Boy Advance game Fire Emblem. ... This is a character guide for the Game Boy Advance game Fire Emblem. ... This is a character guide for the Game Boy Advance game Fire Emblem. ...


The Fire Emblem

The eponymous item of the games is a plot device or item that has taken multiple forms throughout the series, changing with the setting. The original Fire Emblem was a shield. In the remake of the original game in Monshō no Nazo, Marth can use the Fire Emblem to open chests, and in Book Two (the second half of the game), it can be upgraded with five orbs to turn it into the Shield of Seals.[18] In Seisen no Keifu, it does not appear, but it is mentioned as the family crest of the Velthomer house by the person succeeding it.[19] In Fūin no Tsurugi and Fire Emblem, the Fire Emblem is a gemstone required for a ceremony to recognize the heir to the throne of Bern and also to seal away Idoun, the Dark Dragon. In The Sacred Stones, the Fire Emblem is the Sacred Stone of Grado, which holds the Demon King's (a dark deity in Sacred Stones) spirit, but it is split in two (the other half forms the Dark Stone), and the Fire Emblem is crushed. In Path of Radiance and Radiant Dawn, it is another name for Lehran's Medallion, an artifact containing the imprisoned spirit of a dark god. This article is about the defensive device. ... CREST (Cant Really Expect Settlement Today) is the Central Securities Depository for the U.K., Republic of Ireland, Isle of Man and Jersey equities and UK gilts. ... Magvel, the pangaen continent of Fire Emblem: The Sacred Stones, is home to six nation-states of diverse leadership. ...


Setting

The primary settings of the Fire Emblem series are commonly defined by the names of the continents on which the games are set. Aside from Akaneia and Barensia, which are confirmed to be part of the same world, each continent is thought to exist in its own separate universe with its own incarnation of the Fire Emblem. Games set on the same continent are typically linked through the overarching storyline and character relationships. For example, Fire Emblem is a prequel to Fūin no Tsurugi,[20] and some of the characters in these games are blood-related. There are currently six continents:


Akaneia:[1] Ankoku Ryū to Hikari no TsurugiMonshou no Nazo
Barensia:[21] Gaiden
Jugdral: Seisen no KeifuThracia 776[22]
Elibe: Fūin no Tsurugi[15]Fire Emblem[20]
Magvel: Sacred Stones[23]
Tellius: Path of Radiance[24]Radiant Dawn[25]


Games

The following is a list of games released in the series.

Games predating Fire Emblem were released only in Japan. Due to this, there are no official English language titles for these games. An official English language title may be given if Nintendo elects to localize any of these games to North America or the PAL region.
Title Year Platform Notes
Fire Emblem: Ankoku Ryū to Hikari no Tsurugi ("The Dragon of Darkness and the Sword of Light")[26] JP 1990
Famicom The first Fire Emblem title.
Fire Emblem Gaiden ("Sidestory")[27] JP 1992
Famicom Side story of the first title.
Fire Emblem: Monshō no Nazo ("Mystery of the Emblem")[28] JP 1994
Super Famicom, Virtual Console Enhanced remake of Ankoku Ryū to Hikari no Tsurugi along with a sequel. It was adapted into a 2-part anime series. Released on the Wii Virtual Console in Japan in December 2006.
Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu ("Genealogy of the Holy War")[29] JP 1996
Super Famicom, Virtual Console Deviates from standard Fire Emblem gameplay mechanisms. First Fire Emblem set in a separate universe. Released on the Wii Virtual Console in Japan in January 2007.
Fire Emblem: Thracia 776[22] JP 1999
Super Famicom A side story of Seisen no Keifu first released on the Nintendo Power download service. Regular ROM version was released in 2000.
Fire Emblem: Fūin no Tsurugi ("Sword of Seals")[30] JP 2002
Game Boy Advance The first Fire Emblem title to appear on a Nintendo handheld. As of July 2007, it is the last Japan-exclusive Fire Emblem title.
Fire Emblem

Released in Japan as Fire Emblem: Rekka no Ken ("Blazing Sword")[31] Fire Emblem, released in Japan as Fire Emblem: Rekka no Ken , lit. ... This article is about the country in East Asia. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... “NES” redirects here. ... This article is in need of attention. ... This article is about the country in East Asia. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... “NES” redirects here. ... A side story in fiction is a form of narrative that occurs alongside established stories set within a fictional universe. ... This article is about the country in East Asia. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ... This article is about Nintendos emulation feature and download service. ... Fire Emblem is a Japanese anime OAV based on the first game in Nintendos Fire Emblem strategy game series. ... The Wii (pronounced as the pronoun we, IPA: ) is the fifth home video game console released by Nintendo. ... This article is in need of attention. ... This article is about the country in East Asia. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ... This article is about Nintendos emulation feature and download service. ... This article is about the country in East Asia. ... This article is about the year. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ... The Nintendo Power flash RAM cartridge was a Japan-only peripheral produced by Nintendo for the Super Famicom and the Game Boy, which allowed owners to download Super Famicom/Game Boy games onto a special flash RAM cartridge for cheaper than the full cartridge would have been. ... This article is about the country in East Asia. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... “GBA” redirects here. ... A handheld is most often used to refer to: A personal digital assistant (PDA). ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ...

JP 2003
NA 2003
PAL 2004
Game Boy Advance The first Fire Emblem title to be released in the West and the prequel to Fūin no Tsurugi.
Fire Emblem: The Sacred Stones

Released in Japan as Fire Emblem: Seima no Kōseki This article is about the country in East Asia. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... North America North America is a continent [1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Television system by country The PAL region is a video game publication territory which covers Australia, New Zealand, and varying European countries. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... “GBA” redirects here. ...

JP 2004
NA 2005
PAL 2005
Game Boy Advance First title to incorporate several play mechanics not seen since Fire Emblem Gaiden. It is currently the only Fire Emblem title not related to any other game in the series by setting or story.
Fire Emblem: Path of Radiance

Released in Japan as Fire Emblem: Sōen no Kiseki ("Trail of the Blue Flame")[32] This article is about the country in East Asia. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... North America North America is a continent [1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Television system by country The PAL region is a video game publication territory which covers Australia, New Zealand, and varying European countries. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... “GBA” redirects here. ...

JP 2005
NA 2005
PAL 2005
Nintendo Gamecube The first title in the series to be rendered in three-dimensions and to incorporate full motion video.
Fire Emblem: Radiant Dawn

Released in Japan as Fire Emblem: Akatsuki no Megami ("The Goddess of Dawn")[33] This article is about the country in East Asia. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... North America North America is a continent [1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Television system by country The PAL region is a video game publication territory which covers Australia, New Zealand, and varying European countries. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Nintendo GameCube (GCN) is Nintendos fourth home video game console, belonging to the sixth generation era. ... This article is about process of creating 3D computer graphics. ... Screenshot of an FMV from Final Fantasy VIII using Bink Video. ...

JP 2007
NA 2007
PAL Unknown
Wii The sequel to Path of Radiance.
Fire Emblem DS (Tentative name) Unknown DS Enhanced remake of Fire Emblem: Ankoku Ryū to Hikari no Tsurugi. The first game in the series to have online capabilities.[5]

A Fire Emblem game was originally planned for release on the Nintendo 64,[34] but the project was discontinued. This article is about the country in East Asia. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... North America North America is a continent [1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Television system by country The PAL region is a video game publication territory which covers Australia, New Zealand, and varying European countries. ... The term Unknown is used in a number of contexts: To indicate the lack of knowledge, such as the list of unsolved problems, unsolved problems in physics or the unknown unknown To refer to anonymity In mathematics, as a noun, the unknowns of an equation are the quantities (or variables... The Wii (pronounced as the pronoun we, IPA: ) is the fifth home video game console released by Nintendo. ... Fire Emblem DS (tentative title) is the 11th installment of the Fire Emblem series and the first to feature online play. ... DS, Ds or dS can mean: Nintendo DS, a handheld gaming device made by Nintendo Several games for Nintendo DS whose titles use the abbreviation DS in their title: Advance Wars: Dual Strike Castlevania: Dawn of Sorrow Digimon Story Fullmetal Alchemist: Dual Sympathy Guilty Gear: Dust Strikers Mr. ... The Nintendo 64 ), often abbreviated as N64, is Nintendos third home video game console for the international market. ...


Controversy

Controversy began in 2001 when Shouzou Kaga, one of the series' main developers, left Nintendo to found Tirnanog, an independent studio. One of his first games was Tear Ring Saga for the PlayStation, a game that borrowed heavily from the Fire Emblem series in terms of graphics and gameplay.[35] The game was initially similar to Fire Emblem in title, with the development name being Emblem Saga. Nintendo filed a lawsuit against Tirnanog and, the game's distributor, Enterbrain seeking $2 million dollars in the belief that the game infringed upon Nintendo's copyright.[36] Nintendo lost,[35] and Tirnanog later produced a sequel called Tear Ring Saga: Berwick Saga. Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Tear Ring Saga is a simulation role-playing game for the PlayStation developed by Shouzou Kagas development studio Tirnanog and published by Enterbrain. ... The Sony PlayStation ) is a video game console of the 32/64-bit era, first produced by Sony Computer Entertainment in the mid-1990s. ...


Music

The musical scores for Fire Emblem have been composed by Yuka Tsujiyoko for most of the series' history .[37] The first eight games in the series all featured soundtracks composed entirely of instrumental music. However, Fire Emblem: Path of Radiance broke from this trend with the end credit theme "Life Returns", a lyrical piece sung in the language of the fictional heron laguz (bestial humanoids) tribe. A lyrical version of the "Fire Emblem Main Theme" is also used in the upcoming Super Smash Bros. Brawl. Due to the worldwide release of the game, this version of the song is sung in Latin.[38] Yuka Tsujiyoko (辻横 由佳 Tsujiyoko Yuka) is a Japanese video game music composer for Nintendo. ... Super Smash Bros. ...


There are also recurring tracks in the Fire Emblem series. The most frequently used is the "Fire Emblem Main Theme" which is played at some point during each game. Its use is particularly varied, as it is sometimes used as the title screen theme, while in Path of Radiance, the song is not heard until the very end of the game, when each character's performance is ranked. Since Fire Emblem: Seisen no Keifu, battle themes of previous Fire Emblem games have been remixed as arena battle themes. Similar rearranging appears in other circumstances, as well; for example, the musical score for the trial maps in Path of Radiance was originally the music score for Chapter 10 of Seisen no Keifu. The games' music has been released on various soundtracks in Japan.[39] This article is in need of attention. ...


Influence on other media

Anime

In 1995, an anime OVA (co-produced with KSS) named Fire Emblem was produced and released; it was closely based on the first three acts of Monshō no Nazo and was cancelled after only two episodes.[40] It featured Marth, and its story was based upon that of the Fire Emblem games that he appeared in.[41] Animé redirects here. ... A human ovum An ovum (loosely, egg or egg cell) is a female sex cell or gamete. ... KSS is a Japanese company that provides anime studio services including production, music, subtitles and translation. ... Fire Emblem is a Japanese anime OAV based on the first game in Nintendos Fire Emblem strategy game series. ... Marth ) is a character from the Fire Emblem series of video games. ...


Card game

The Fire Emblem trading card game was released by NTT Publishing Co., Ltd. in August 2001. Six series were produced before its termination in 2006. The first three series depicted characters from Seisen no Keifu, the fourth featured characters from Thracia 776, and the Anthology expansion featured characters from both games, but with artwork from different artists. The final two expansions featured characters from Monshō no Nazo. The trading card game is similar to battles in Fire Emblem, but players battle with different types of cards, such as character, terrain, weapon and surprise cards. NTT Publishing also published Fire Emblem soundtracks and books.[42]


Appearance in other games

Since its inception in 1990, the Fire Emblem series had largely been confined to Japan. In 2001, however, Nintendo released Super Smash Bros. Melee, a fighting game containing characters from throughout the company's videogaming history. The original Japanese release of this game contained two characters from the Fire Emblem series: Marth, the protagonist of the first game, Fire Emblem: Ankoku no Ryū to Hikari no Tsurugi, and the third, Fire Emblem: Monshō no Nazo; and Roy,[43] who stars in the then-unreleased sixth game, Fire Emblem: Fūin no Tsurugi. According to Nintendo's official Japanese website, Marth was put in Super Smash Bros. Melee upon the request of Japanese gamers. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Ike ) is a character from the Fire Emblem series of video games. ... Super Smash Bros. ... Super Smash Bros. ... Marth ) is a character from the Fire Emblem series of video games. ...


Marth's design and playability earned him extra attention while the game underwent debug testing in North America, and it was by the decision of Nintendo of America that he was included in the North American version. Roy had been included in Japan to promote the upcoming release of Fūin no Tsurugi, and was likewise included in the North American version. It was due in part to Marth and Roy's popularity from their appearance in Super Smash Bros. Melee that Nintendo eventually decided to localize and market Fire Emblem games for North American and European release.[7]


If Marth is unlocked and all players hold some specific buttons, a remixed version of some songs that were present in previous Fire Emblem games will play instead of the stage's original music.[44] Although there is no word yet on whether Marth or Roy will return in Super Smash Bros. Brawl, Ike (from Path of Radiance and Radiant Dawn) has been confirmed to appear as a playable character.[45] Lyn, one of the lords from Fire Emblem, also makes an appearance as an Assist Trophy item summon.[46] One of the game's stages, Castle Siege, is inspired by the Fire Emblem series.[47] The Fire Emblem Main Theme has been arranged similar to the Super Smash Bros. Brawl main theme, including orchestral arrangement and Latin lyrics. [48] Super Smash Bros. ... Fire Emblem, released in Japan as Fire Emblem: Rekka no Ken , lit. ...


In another Intelligent Systems game, Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door, a minor character in Petalburg raves about his favorite video games when spoken to. The first game he talks about is Fire Emblem.[49] Likewise, the Nintendo DS game Daigasso! Band-Brothers features the Fire Emblem theme as a song.[50] Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door is the sequel to the Nintendo 64 video game Paper Mario, and is the fourth in the series of Mario role-playing game titles that includes Super Mario RPG, Paper Mario, and Mario & Luigi: Superstar Saga. ... Fire Emblem, released in Japan as Fire Emblem: Rekka no Ken , lit. ... NDS redirects here. ... Daigasso! Band-Brothers is a DJ style music game for the Nintendo DS where players can play the parts of multiple music instruments in one song, allowing them to play any part of a MIDI-style song. ...


Media reception and sales

The Fire Emblem games have scored well in the media — Fire Emblem was awarded 9.5 by IGN in 2003.[9] However, the games have gradually been receiving lower average scores as the series moves on. On Game Rankings, Fire Emblem averages 88%, The Sacred Stones averages 85%, and Path of Radiance averages 86%.[51] Critics have welcomed the character development and plotlines but have criticized the limited multiplayer options.[9] Critics have also commented negatively on the 3D graphics of Path of Radiance.[52] In 2006, Fire Emblem: Monshō no Nazo appeared in Famitsu's Top 100 Games list, where it is number 68.[53] For other uses, see IGN (disambiguation). ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Game Rankings is a website which keeps track of video game reviews from other sites, and combines them to present an average rating for each game. ... This article is about process of creating 3D computer graphics. ... Cover art for Issue 1 of FamitsÅ« magazine, June 1986, then known as Famicom TsÅ«shin FamitsÅ« abbreviated ファミ Fami) is a Japanese video game magazine published by Enterbrain, Inc. ...


As of November 2007, Radiant Dawn—which has been released in Japan and the USA— ranked 81% on Game Rankings.[54] On the week ending February 25, 2007, Radiant Dawn was the highest selling Wii game of that week, with 73,359 sales.[55] is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


See also

Nintendo Wars (Japanese: ファミコンウォーズ Famicom Wars) is a series of military turn-based strategy video games (See wargame), developed by Intelligent Systems and published by Nintendo. ... Tear Ring Saga is a simulation role-playing game for the PlayStation developed by Shouzou Kagas development studio Tirnanog and published by Enterbrain. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Derek Miller. "'A History of Fire Emblem: Dark Dragon and Sword of Light'", A History of Fire Emblem, January 2004. Retrieved on 2007-07-14. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Bethany Massimilla. "'Fire Emblem for Game Boy Advance Review'", Gamespot, 2003-11-11. Retrieved on 2007-07-09. 
  3. ^ a b "'Fire Emblem Database list'", Nintendo Database. Retrieved on 2007-07-09. 
  4. ^ IGN Staff. "'Fire Emblem set for DS'", IGN, 2007-10-10. Retrieved on 2007-10-10. 
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Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Gregory A. Kasavin (born 1977 in Moscow)[1] is the former site director and executive editor at the gaming website GameSpot. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see IGN (disambiguation). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Nintendo Company, Limited (任天堂 or ニンテンドー Nintendō; NASDAQ: NTDOY, TYO: 7974 usually referred to as simply Nintendo, or Big N ) is a multinational corporation founded on September 23, 1889[1] in Kyoto, Japan by Fusajiro Yamauchi to produce handmade hanafuda cards. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Gregory A. Kasavin (born 1977 in Moscow)[1] is the former site director and executive editor at the gaming website GameSpot. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The cover of the January 95 issue of Next Generation. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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Fire Emblem - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2782 words)
The Fire Emblem games are known to be the first of their genre, the strategic role-playing game, with a very strong emphasis on western forms of medieval folklore.
The original Fire Emblem was a shield which allowed the wielder, Marth, to use the Falchion sword.
Fire Emblem: The Sacred Stones was scored by Saki Haruyama, Yoshihiko Kitamura, and Yoshito Hirano, under Tsujiyoko's supervision.
Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Fire Emblem (2549 words)
During the second part of Monshō no Nazo, the Fire Emblem can be upgraded with five orbs to turn it into the Shield of Seals.
A teaser of a Fire Emblem game for Wii was shown at E3 2006, showing that a sequel is well underway.
Fire Emblem World - A Fire Emblem dedicated site with a large amount of FE information and resources.
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