FACTOID # 30: If Alaska were its own country, it would be the 26th largest in total area, slightly larger than Iran.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Finnish Defence Forces
Finnish Defence Forces
Military manpower
Military age 18 years of age for voluntary and compulsory military service (October 2004)
Availability males age 15–49: 1,226,890 (2004 est.)
Fit for military service males age 15–49: 1,013,961 (2004 est.)
Reaching military age annually males: 32,058 (2004 est.)
Active troops
Military expenditures
Amount $2.6 billion (FY05/06)
Percent of GDP 1,4% (FY05/06)

The Finnish Defence Forces (Finnish Puolustusvoimat; Swedish Försvarsmakten) is a cadre army of 16500, of which 8700 professional soldiers (officers), with a standard readiness strength of 34,700 people in uniform (27,300 army, 3,000 navy, and 4,400 air force). Finland's defence budget equals about 1.4% of the GDP. A universal male conscription is in place, under which all men above 18 years of age serve from 6 to 12 months. However, inhabitants of Finland's Åland islands and Jehovah's Witnesses are exempt. Also a 13-month-long non-military service is possible. As of 1995, women were permitted to serve on a voluntary basis. The defence is based on a large trained reserve. During the Cold War, Finland could have mobilized 490,000 reservists in a conflict, but this number has since been reduced to some 350,000 due to ongoing budget cuts. Image File history File links Suomen_Puolustusvoimien_tornileijona. ... En cadre is a French expression denoting a military unit composed mostly of officers. ... Motto: None Anthem: Ã…länningens sÃ¥ng Capital Mariehamn Largest city Mariehamn Official language(s) Swedish Government Autonomous province  - Governor Peter Lindbäck1  - Premier Roger Nordlund Autonomy From Finland   - Declared 1920   - Recognized 19212  Accession to EU January 1, 19953 Area    - Total 13,517 km² (n/a)   5,267 sq mi... A conscientious objector is a person whose beliefs are incompatible with military service - perhaps with any role in the armed forces (in which case he or she is either pacifist or antimilitarist) - or who objects to a particular war. ... Combatants Communists: Warsaw Pact, Soviet Union and its allied Anti-communists: Nato, United States and its allied Peoples Republic of China and its allied Casualties 70 millions civilians The Cold War (Russian: Холодная Война Kholodnaya Voina) was the protracted geopolitical, ideological, and economic struggle that emerged after World War II between... A member of the United States Military that spends one weekend a month and two weeks annually training to protect and defend the United States. ...


The Finnish Defence Forces are under the command of the Chief of Defence, who is directly subordinate to the President of the Republic in matters related to the military command. The current Chief of Defence is Admiral Juhani Kaskeala. The President of Finland (Suomen Tasavallan Presidentti; Republiken Finlands President) is the Head of State of Finland. ... Admiral Juhani Kaskeala Juhani Kaskeala (born 1946) is a Finnish admiral and commander of the Finnish Defence Forces. ...


Military doctrine: Self-defensive; independent defence of all of domestic territory; NATO Partnership for Peace affiliate; committed to pan-European (incl. Russia) treaty of trust-enhancing cooperation, such as providing access for international observers during major exercises. NATO 2002 Summit in Prague The North Atlantic Treaty Organisation[1] (NATO), also called the North Atlantic Alliance, the Atlantic Alliance or the Western Alliance, is an international organisation for collective security established in 1949, in support of the North Atlantic Treaty signed in Washington, DC, on 4 April 1949. ...


In 2005 the Finnish defence ministry announced a cost-cutting plan. The Helsinki Air Defence Regiment in Hyrylä and the Savo Brigade in Mikkeli will be disbanded in 2007. At the same time Kotka Coastal Command will be disbanded and its duties will be taken over by other units. Helsinki Air Defence Regiment (Helsingin Ilmatorjuntarykmentti, HellItR) is a Finnish Army unit located in Hyrylä (some 30 km from Helsinki). ... The city of Mikkeli Mikkeli or S:t Michel in Swedish is a town and municipality in Finland. ... 2007 (MMVII) will be a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents


Military branches


Finnish Defence Forces
Finnish Army Air Force Finnish Navy

The Frontier Guard (Rajavartiolaitos) is under the Ministry of the Interior but can be incorporated into the Defence Forces when required by defence readiness. Image File history File links Suomen_Puolustusvoimien_tornileijona. ... Image File history File links Suomen_Maavoimien_tunnus. ... Image File history File links Suomen_Ilmavoimien_tunnus. ... Image File history File links Suomen_Merivoimien_tunnus. ... The Finnish Army (Finnish: Maavoimat) is one of the branches of the Finnish Defence Forces. ... The Finnish Air Force (Finnish: Ilmavoimat) is one of the branches of the Finnish Defence Forces. ... Finnish Naval Ensign The Finnish Navy (Finnish: Suomen merivoimat) is one of the branches of the Finnish Defence Forces. ... The Finnish Army (Finnish: Maavoimat) is one of the branches of the Finnish Defence Forces. ... Finnish Naval Ensign The Finnish Navy (Finnish: Suomen merivoimat) is one of the branches of the Finnish Defence Forces. ... The Finnish Air Force (Finnish: Ilmavoimat) is one of the branches of the Finnish Defence Forces. ... The Border Guard (Finnish: Rajavartiolaitos) of Finland is the Finnish security authority responsible for the border security. ...


Military Ranks

Army and Air Force Officer Ranks
Finnish Swedish English German
Kenraali General General General
Kenraaliluutnantti Generallöjtnant Lieutenant General Generalleutnant
Kenraalimajuri Generalmajor Major General Generalmajor
Prikaatikenraali Brigadgeneral Brigadier General Brigadegeneral
Eversti Överste Colonel Oberst
Everstiluutnantti Överstelöjtnant Lieutenant Colonel Oberstleutnant
Majuri Major Major Major
Kapteeni Kapten Captain Hauptmann
Yliluutnantti Premiärlöjtnant Senior Lieutenant Oberleutnant
Luutnantti Löjtnant Lieutenant Leutnant
Vänrikki Fänrik Second Lieutenant Fähnrich
Navy Officer Ranks
Finnish Swedish English
Amiraali Amiral Admiral
Vara-amiraali Viceamiral Vice Admiral
Kontra-amiraali Konteramiral Rear Admiral
Lippueamiraali Flottiljamiral Commodore
Kommodori Kommodor Captain
Komentaja Kommendör Commander
Komentajakapteeni Kommendörkapten Lieutenant Commander
Kapteeniluutnantti Kaptenlöjtnant Lieutenant, Senior Grade
Yliluutnantti Premiärlöjtnant Lieutenant
Luutnantti Löjtnant Lieutenant, Junior Grade
Aliluutnantti Underlöjtnant Sub-Lieutenant
Army and Air Force Enlisted Ranks
Finnish Swedish English
Sotilasmestari(*) Militärmästare Chief Warrant Officer 
Vääpeli(*) Fältväbel Warrant Officer 
Ylikersantti Översergeant Staff Sergeant
Kersantti Sergeant Sergeant
Alikersantti Undersergeant Corporal
Korpraali Korpral Lance Corporal
Sotamies Soldat Private
Navy Enlisted Ranks
Finnish Swedish English
Sotilasmestari Militärmästare Chief Warrant Officer 
Pursimies Båtsman Chief Petty Officer 
Ylikersantti Översergeant Petty Officer 1st Class
Kersantti Sergeant Petty Officer 2nd Class
Alikersantti Undersergeant Petty Officer 3rd Class
Ylimatruusi Övermatros Able Seaman
Matruusi Matros Seaman

The rank of sotamies is not actually given to new recruits anymore, although it was used earlier. The lowest rank is per specialization or after the military unit in which the private is serving. In the infantry the rank is jääkäri (Jäger), artillery has tykkimies (gunner), signals has viestimies (signalman), Guard Jäger Regiment has kaartinjääkäri (guard jäger), and so on. Generally file and rank may be referred to as sotamiehet. A General is an officer of high military rank. ... Lieutenant General is a military rank used in many countries. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... Colonel (IPA: or ) is a military rank of a commissioned officer, with the corresponding ranks existing in nearly every country in the world. ... In the U.S. Army, Air Force and Marine Corps, a lieutenant colonel is a commissioned officer superior to a major and inferior to a colonel. ... Major is a military rank denoting an officer of mid-level command status. ... This article concerns the rank and title of Captain. ... Lieutenant is a military, paramilitary, fire service or police officer rank. ... Second Lieutenant is the lowest commissioned rank in many armed forces. ... Admiral is the rank, or part of the name of the ranks, of the highest naval officers. ... Vice Admiral is a naval rank of three star level, equivalent to Lieutenant General in seniority. ... The term Rear Admiral originated from the days of Naval Sailing Squadrons, and can trace its origins to the British Royal Navy. ... Commodore is a military rank used in some navies for officers whose position exceeds that of a Captain, but is less than that of a flag officer. ... This article concerns the rank and title of Captain. ... Insignia of a United States Navy Commander Commander is a military rank used in many navies but not generally in armies or air forces. ... In the Royal Navy, United States Navy and United States Coast Guard, a lieutenant commander (lieutenant-commander or Lt Cdr in the RN) is a commissioned officer superior to a lieutenant and inferior to a commander. ... Lieutenant is a military, paramilitary, fire service or police officer rank. ... LTJG insignia. ... A Lieutenant, Junior Grade, is a division officer in the United States Navy. ... A warrant officer (WO) or a chief warrant officer (CWO) is a member of a military organization, with a rank subordinate to other commissioned officers and senior to noncommissioned officers. ... A Warrant Officer (WO) is a member of a military organization holding one of a specific group of ranks. ... United States Military Staff Sergeant insignia (U.S. Air Force) Staff Sergeant is the fifth enlisted rank in the U.S. Air Force, just above Senior Airman and below Technical Sergeant. ... Sergeant is a rank used in some form by most militaries, police forces, and other uniformed organisations around the world. ... Corporal is a rank in use in some form by most militaries, police forces or other uniformed organizations around the world. ... Lance Corporal (LCpl or L/Cpl) is a military rank used by some elements of the British, Commonwealth, and U.S. armed forces. ... A private is a military soldier of the lowest military rank (equivalent to Nato Rank Grades OR-1 to OR-3 depending on the force served in). ... A warrant officer (WO) or a chief warrant officer (CWO) is a member of a military organization, with a rank subordinate to other commissioned officers and senior to noncommissioned officers. ... Chief Petty Officer is a noncommissioned officer or equivalent in many navies. ... Good conduct variation Petty Officer First Class insignia Petty Officer First Class is the sixth enlisted rank in the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard, just above Petty Officer Second Class and below Chief Petty Officer, and is a non-commissioned officer. ... Good conduct variation Petty Officer Second Class insignia Petty Officer Second Class is the fifth enlisted rank in the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard, just above Petty Officer Third Class and below Petty Officer First Class, and is a non-commissioned officer. ... Good conduct variation Petty Officer Third Class insignia Petty Officer Third Class is the fourth enlisted rank in the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard, just above Seaman and below Petty Officer Second Class, and is the lowest form of non-commissioned officer, equivalent to a Corporal in... In the Royal Navy in the middle of the 18th century, the term Able Seaman referred to a seaman with at least two years experience at sea. ... Seaman can be a generic term for sailor. ... Jäger (plural also Jäger, both pronounced as the surname Yeager) is a German word for hunter. In English it is often written with the plural Jägers, or as jaeger (pl. ...


Obsolete or historical ranks include: ylivääpeli/överfältväbel (a rank between Chief Warrant Officer and Warrant Officer), kornetti, ratsumestari, prikaatinkenraali (old form for prikaatikenraali) and lentomestari. Cornet was the third and lowest grade of commissioned officer in a British cavalry troop, after the Captain and Lieutenant. ... Rittmeister was a military rank of a commissioned cavalry officer in charge of a squadron, an equivalent of Captain, employed in German and Austro-Hungarian cavalry. ...


Semi-obsolete ranks include those of warrant officers (vääpeli, sotilasmestari), as since training of full-time employed NCOs ended in 2001, and those who have recently graduated from the NCO academy usually hold the rank of a Second Lieutenant or a Lieutenant. Those who held the ranks of vääpeli or sotilasmestari have been retired or promoted to Second Lieutenant or Lieutenant in order to streamline the ranks of employed personnel. From 2001 onwards, the National Defence College train all new commissioned officers.


Some semi-obsolete ranks are still used for NCOs in the reserve. The highest attainable rank for conscripts at the end of their mandatory service are lance corporal (file and rank), sergeant (NCOs) and second lieutenant/vänrikki (automatic promotion for officer "students" on the day their service is over, who are in practise the most senior NCO conscripts). In the reserve, one can get higher promotions, but in the end, a conscript is always considered lower in rank to any commissioned officers or employed personnel.


Carl Gustaf Emil Mannerheim is the only person to have held the title of sotamarsalkka/fältmarskalk (Field Marshal) and later Suomen marsalkka/Marskalk av Finland (Marshal of Finland). Note that both Sotamarsalkka and Suomen marsalkka were officially not military ranks, but rather honorary titles. In practice Sotamarsalkka was treated as a rank, and it had a distinctive rank insignia. As Suomen marsalkka Mannerheim continued to wear the insignia of sotamarsalkka. C.G.E. Mannerheim C.G.E. Mannerheims autograph This article is about the Finnish statesman and Commander-in-Chief. ... C.G.E. Mannerheim wearing the rank insignia of sotamarsalkka, Finnish field marshal. ... The famous Mannerheims equestrian statue by the Mannerheim road in downtown Helsinki, the capital of Finland Baron Carl Gustaf Emil Mannerheim (June 4, 1867 – January 28, 1951) was Finlands reputed Commander-in-Chief and later President of Finland (1944–1946). ...


History

The autonomous Grand Duchy of Finland had its of standing army and its own system of conscription. The Guard of Finland fought alongside the imperial army in several of Russias wars. Russification efforts after 1899 resulted in dodging of the draft and later in the abolishment of conscription. The Grand Duchy of Finland was a state that existed 1809–1917 as part of the Russian Empire. ... Between 1809 and 1917 Finland was an autonomous part of the Russian Empire as the Grand Duchy of Finland. ... Between 1809 and 1917 Finland was an autonomous part of the Russian Empire as the Grand Duchy of Finland. ... Imperial Russia is the term used to cover the period of history from the expansion of Russia under Peter the Great, through the expansion of the Russian Empire from the Baltic Sea to the Pacific Ocean, to the deposal of Nicholas II of Russia, the last tsar, at the start... The policy of Russification of Finland, 1899–1917, aimed at the termination of Finland’s autonomy but resulted in fierce Finnish resistance that ultimately led to Finlands declaration of independence in 1917. ... 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


During World War I Finnish volunteers secretly joined the Imperial German army to receive military traning. These Finnish Jäger troops arrived in February 1918 in the white capital city of Vaasa and formed the core of the White Army in the Finnish Civil War. Combatants Allied Powers: British Empire Canada France Italy Russian Empire United States Central Powers: Austria-Hungary Bulgaria German Empire Ottoman Empire Commanders Douglas Haig John Jellicoe Sir Arthur Currie Ferdinand Foch Nicholas II Woodrow Wilson John Pershing Wilhelm II Reinhard Scheer Franz Josef I Oskar Potiorek Ä°smail Enver Ferdinand I... Motto: Gott mit Uns (German: God with us”) Anthem: Heil dir im Siegerkranz (unofficial) Territory of the German Empire in 1914, prior to World War I   Capital Berlin Official language(s) German Minor language(s) Polish (Posen, Upper Silesia, Masuria) French (Elsass-Lothringen) Government Constitutional Monarchy  - First Kaiser Wilhelm I... History The Jäger troops were volunteers from Finland in Germany trained as Jägers (elite light infantry) during World War I. It was one of many means by which Germany intended to weaken Russia and to cause Russias loss of western provinces and dependencies. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Founded 1606 Province Western Finland Region Ostrobothnia Sub-region Vaasa Area - Of which land - Rank 397 km² 183 km² ranked 345th Population - Population density - Rank 57,266 311,2 inh. ... Combatants Whites: White Guards German Empire Swedish volunteers Reds: Red Guards Bolshevist Russia Commanders Carl Gustav Emil Mannerheim Ali Aaltonen Eero Haapalainen Eino Rahja Kullervo Manner Strength 50,000 - 90,000 50,000 - 90,000 Casualties 3,450 killed in action 1, 400-1,650 executed 46 missing 5,200...


The Russian revolutions had caused the creation of Red and White Guards in Finland. On January 25, 1918 the White Guard were declared to be the official troops of the white government. This marks the formation of the armed forces of the independent Finland. The Russian Revolution of 1917 was a series of political events in Russia, which, after the elimination of the Russian autocracy system, and the Provisional Government (Duma), resulted in the establishment of the Soviet power under the control of the Bolshevik party. ... During the Civil War in Finland, 1918, the Red Guards were the rebellious supporters of totalitarian who were defeated by the anti-Socialist White Guards and (Imperial) German forces, who feared the Russian Revolution was spread to Finland by the Reds rebellion. ... The White Guards is one translation of the Finnish term Suojeluskunta (plural: Suojeluskunnat, Finland-Swedish: Skyddskår) that unfortunately has received many different translations to English, for instance: Security Guard, Civil Guard, National Guard, White Militia, Defence Corps, Protection Guard, Protection Corps and Protection Militia. ... January 25 is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... The White Guards is one translation of the Finnish term Suojeluskunta (plural: Suojeluskunnat, Finland-Swedish: Skyddskår) that unfortunately has received many different translations to English, for instance: Security Guard, Civil Guard, National Guard, White Militia, Defence Corps, Protection Guard, Protection Corps and Protection Militia. ...


After the Finnish Civil War the armed forces were organised according to the German system. In February 1919 the White Guard separated from the armed forces and became an independent organisation. Combatants Whites: White Guards German Empire Swedish volunteers Reds: Red Guards Bolshevist Russia Commanders Carl Gustav Emil Mannerheim Ali Aaltonen Eero Haapalainen Eino Rahja Kullervo Manner Strength 50,000 - 90,000 50,000 - 90,000 Casualties 3,450 killed in action 1, 400-1,650 executed 46 missing 5,200... 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


Finnish Defence Forces fought in two wars against the Soviet Union (Winter War and Continuation war) and then against Germany (Lapland War) in the Second World War. Combatants Finland Soviet Union Commanders Carl Gustaf Emil Mannerheim Kliment Voroshilov, later Semyon Timoshenko Strength 200,000 men, 32 tanks, 119 aircraft (In the beginning), 250,000 men, 30 tanks, 130 aircraft (At the end) 460,000 men, 1,500 tanks, 1,000 aircraft (In the beginning), 1,000,000... The Continuation War or War of Continuation (Finnish: , Swedish: ) June 25, 1941-September 19, 1944, was the war that was fought between Finland and the Soviet Union during World War II. The United Kingdom declared war on Finland on December 6, 1941, but did not participate actively. ... Combatants Germany Finland Commanders Lothar Rendulic Hjalmar Siilasvuo Strength 200,000 60,000 Casualties 950 killed 2,000 wounded 1,300 captured 774 killed 3,000 wounded 262 missing The Lapland War is a name used for the hostilities between Finland and Germany between September 1944 and April 1945. ...


Peace terms in the Continuation War included disbanding the White Guard.


Restrictions on armaments

The Paris Peace Treaty after the Continuation War limited the strength of the Finnish Army to 34,400 men, the Navy to 4,500 men and the maximum displacement of naval ships to 10,000 tonnes. The Air Force was limited to 3,000 men and 60 planes. Also certain weapons such as guided missiles, submarines, proximity mines, torpedo boats, bombers with internal bomb racks and any weapons of German origin were forbidden. Later "defensive" missiles were allowed. All of the restrictions, except for the ban on nuclear weapons, were unilaterally lifted by president Mauno Koivisto after the breakup of the Soviet Union. This page is about the partial formal conclusion of World War II. For other Paris peace treaties see article Treaty of Paris. ... The Continuation War or War of Continuation (Finnish: , Swedish: ) June 25, 1941-September 19, 1944, was the war that was fought between Finland and the Soviet Union during World War II. The United Kingdom declared war on Finland on December 6, 1941, but did not participate actively. ... A guided missile is a military rocket that can be directed in flight to change its flight path. ... German UC-1 class World War I submarine A model of Gunter Priens Unterseeboot 47 (U-47), German WWII Type VII diesel-electric hunter-killer (SSK) submarine Inside of the Argonaute, showing the typical obstructed, tiny space of a post-WWII diesel attack submarine. ... A naval mine is a self-contained explosive device placed in water to destroy ships or submarines. ... A torpedo boat is a relatively small and fast naval ship designed to launch torpedoes at larger surface ships. ... A bomber is a military aircraft designed to attack ground targets, primarily by dropping bombs. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 km (11 mi) above the epicenter. ... Mauno Koivisto 1987 Mauno Henrik Koivisto (born November 25, 1923) was the President of Finland from 1982 to 1994. ... // The rise of Gorbachev Although reform stalled between 1964–1982, the generational shift gave new momentum for reform. ...


Peacekeeping operations

Finland has taken part in UN peacekeeping operations since 1956, (the number of Finnish peacekeepers who have served since 1956 amount to 43,000). In 2003 over a thousand Finnish peacekeepers were involved in peacekeeping operations,including UN and NATO led missions. According to the Finnish law the maximum simultaneous strength of the peacekeeping forces is limited to 2000 soldiers. Peacekeeping is a way to help countries torn by conflict create conditions for sustainable peace. ... 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Since 1996 the Pori brigade has trained a special jäger battalion, the Finnish Rapid Deployment Force (FRDF), which can take part in crisis management operations at short notice. The Pori Brigade (Finnish: Porin Prikaati) based in Huovirinne is part of the Western Command of Finland. ... Symbol of the Austrian 14th Armoured Battalion in NATO military graphic symbols A battalion is a military unit usually consisting of between two and six companies and typically commanded by a Lieutenant Colonel. ... // Description The FRDF arm patch insignia. ...


Finnish participation and number of personnel in peacekeeping operations as of 2006:

Source: www.mil.fi EUFOR former Commander General David Leakey Soldier of the EUFOR participating in operation Spring Lift, as part of Althea The EUFOR or European Union Force is an international military force under the supervision of the European Council. ... Bosnia and Herzegovina (also variously written Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bosnia and Hercegovina, Bosnia-Hercegovina) is a mountainous country in the western Balkans. ... Pocket badge of the KFOR Ukrainian soldier on foot patrolling in Serbian village near Brezovica KFOR vehicle of the French Army The Kosovo Force (KFOR) is a NATO-led international force responsible for establishing and maintaining security in Kosovo. ... For other uses of the name Kosovo, see Kosovo (disambiguation). ... The United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo or UNMIK is an interim civilian administration of the Serbian province (as part of Serbia and Montenegro) called Kosovo (officially Kosovo and Metohia), under the authority of the United Nations. ... The United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP) was established in 1964 to prevent a recurrence of fighting between the Greek Cypriots and Turkish Cypriots. ... UNMIL is the acronym for the United Nations Mission in Liberia, a peace-keeping force for Liberia, which was established by Resolution 1509 of the United Nations Security Council in 2003. ... UNTSO is an acronym for United Nations Truce Supervision Organization, an organization founded in 1948 for peacekeeping in the Middle East. ... The United Nations Mission in Ethiopia and Eritrea (UNMEE) was originally formed to monitor a ceasefire in the border war that began in 1998 between Ethiopia and Eritrea. ... ISAF can stand for: International Sailing Federation International Security Assistance Force This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... UNMOGIP or United Nations Military Observer Group in India and Pakistan was set up in 1949 to supervise the ceasefire between India and Pakistan in the State of Jammu and Kashmir. ... UNIFIL (United Nations Interim Forces In Lebanon) was created in 1978 by the United Nations to confirm Israeli withdrawal from Lebanon, restore the international peace and security, and help the Lebanese Government restore its effective authority in the area. ...


See also

History The Jäger troops were volunteers from Finland in Germany trained as Jägers (elite light infantry) during World War I. It was one of many means by which Germany intended to weaken Russia and to cause Russias loss of western provinces and dependencies. ... The White Guards is one translation of the Finnish term Suojeluskunta (plural: Suojeluskunnat, Finland-Swedish: Skyddskår) that unfortunately has received many different translations to English, for instance: Security Guard, Civil Guard, National Guard, White Militia, Defence Corps, Protection Guard, Protection Corps and Protection Militia. ... The Nordic battlegroup is one of many European Union battlegroups. ... // Description The FRDF arm patch insignia. ... This is a list of senior officers of the Finnish Defence Forces since Finlands independence. ...

External links

  • Finnish Defence Forces website
  • Global Defence news, discussions and military pictures @ Defense Talk.com
  • Chinese Defence Today
  • Finnish Peacekeeping Operations (in Finnish)

  Results from FactBites:
 
IBM - Finnish Defence Forces selects IBM (621 words)
The Finnish Defence Forces (FDF) has chosen IBM to be the integrator for a new operations system (iC4I - command, control, communications, computing, intelligence).
FDF's answer to the future needs is network-enabled defence (NED), which is a working title related to the further development of the FDF territorial defence doctrine.
We are pleased to be leveraging this expertise for the Finnish Defence Forces.
IBM Uutiset - 2005-12-30 Finnish Defence Forces selects IBM Suomi (638 words)
The FDF is a founding member of the Centre.
FDF's answer to the future needs is network-enabled defence (NED), which is a working title related to the further development of the FDF territorial defence doctrine.
We are pleased to be leveraging this expertise for the Finnish Defence Forces.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m