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Encyclopedia > Finnic peoples
Approximate geographical distribution of areas where indigenous Finno-Ugric languages are spoken. Diagonal patterns indicate sparsely populated areas. Dotted lines mark boundaries of corresponding subnational administrative units.
Approximate geographical distribution of areas where indigenous Finno-Ugric languages are spoken. Diagonal patterns indicate sparsely populated areas. Dotted lines mark boundaries of corresponding subnational administrative units.

The term Finnic peoples (Fennic, sometimes Baltic-Finnic) refers to peoples speaking the closely related Finnic languages (also known as Balto-Finnic languages). A Finnic language is the largest language in Finland (Finnish) and Estonia (Estonia). Most other Finnic languages are spoken in Russia, mostly in areas close to Finland and Estonia. In parts of Northern Sweden, Finnish has a considerable presence while more marginal Finnic minorities are found in Norway and Latvia. Whether the Finnic peoples also are more closely related to each others than to their non-Finnic speaking neighbours is questionable. The area has seen a considerable mixing of peoples and language swifts. Swedish used to be more widespread in Finland and Estonia than it is today, Finnish used to be spoken over larger parts of Sweden than today and much of contemporary Latvia was inhabited by speakers of Finnic languages. This makes claims to a distinct Finnic ethnicity dubious. Image File history File links Finno-Ugric_languages. ... Image File history File links Finno-Ugric_languages. ... Geographical distribution of Finno-Ugric (Finno-Permic in blue, Ugric in green). ...


The term "Finnic" is also used sometimes to describe speakers of the Finno-Permic and Finno-Volgaic languages of the Uralic language family. Geographical distribution of Samoyedic, Finnic, Ugric and Yukaghir languages  Yukaghir  Samoyedic  Ugric  Finnic The Uralic languages form a language family of about 30 languages spoken by approximately 20 million people. ...

Contents


History

Map showing some territories inhabited - up to the recent times - by the Finnic peoples in areas bordering Finland: Karelia and Ingria up to the World War 2; presently Finland and Estonia; Finnic minorities also in Torne Valley (modern-day Northern Sweden) and in Finnmark (modern-day Northern Norway).
Enlarge
Map showing some territories inhabited - up to the recent times - by the Finnic peoples in areas bordering Finland: Karelia and Ingria up to the World War 2; presently Finland and Estonia; Finnic minorities also in Torne Valley (modern-day Northern Sweden) and in Finnmark (modern-day Northern Norway).

There exist different theories on the pre-history of the farming Finnic peoples. According to earlier established theories, agricultural Finnic peoples were believed to have inhabited parts of what are now the Baltic countries several millennia BCE. They were thought to have migrated over the Karelian isthmus into the inland of present-day Finland and Karelia in the first millennium, perhaps due to the Germanic and Slavic migration period, or for other reasons. Since the 1970s, this theory has been considered obsolete: serious indications of any major migration do not exist. Archaeological record suggests instead a continuity of settlement from the Stone Age to the first millennium, and a continuous current of immigrants — and modern linguists agree[1]. Image File history File links Map of Greater Finland. ... Image File history File links Map of Greater Finland. ... Map showing the parts Karelia is traditionally divided into. ... The Ingrian flag Map of Karelia giving an idea of where Ingria lies. ... The Torne Valley or Torne River Valley, is a valley on the border of Sweden and Finland. ... County NO-20 Region Nord-Norge Administrative centre Vadsø County mayor   Area  - Total  - Percentage Ranked 1 48,618 km² 15. ... In norwegian: Nord-Norge meaning Northern Norway. ... Prehistory (Greek words προ = before and ιστορία = history) is the period of human history prior to the advent of writing (which marks the beginning of recorded history). ... The three Baltic states: Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania The terms Baltic countries, Baltic Sea countries, Baltic states, and Balticum refer to slightly different combinations of countries in the general area surrounding the Baltic Sea. ... The Karelian Isthmus is the narrow stretch of land between the Gulf of Finland and Lake Ladoga in northwestern Russia. ... Human migration denotes any movement of groups of people from one locality to another, rather than of individual wanderers. ... Stone Age fishing hook. ...


The largest Finnic immigrant wave swept through northern Scandinavia in the 16th18th centuries, stretching from Lake Vänern in the south to the Arctic Sea in the north. (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Lake Vänern Vänern is the largest lake in Sweden, and the third largest lake in Europe, covering an area of 5,655 km². Its main tributary is Klarälven, which flows into the lake near the city of Karlstadt. ... The Arctic Ocean, located entirely in the north polar region, is the smallest of the worlds five oceans (after the Atlantic Ocean, Indian Ocean, and Southern Ocean), and the shallowest. ...


Modern Finnic nations

The Finnic peoples and their subgroups are:

The Ingrians, Tornedalians and Kvens are considered their own separate Finnic ethnic groups. The Forest Finns are an extinct ethnic group whose culture is undergoing a cultural revival by assimilated descendants. The Karelians, on the other hand, are occasionally seen as an eastern branch of the Finns proper. The Livonians were the indigenous Finnics who since ancient times populated the shores of the Gulf of Riga adjacent to the Indo-European Balts. ... Võros (võrokõsõq) are an autochthonous linguistic minority in south-eastern Estonia. ... Setos (setoq) are an autochthonous ethnic and linguistic minority in south-eastern Estonia and north-western Russia. ... For the process of ballot-casting, see Vote. ... The Izhorians (sg. ... Vepses or vepsians are Finnic people that speak Veps language, which belongs to the Baltic-Finnic branch of Finno-ugric family. ... Vepses or vepsians are Finnic people that speak Veps language, which belongs to the Baltic-Finnic branch of Finno-ugric family. ... The Karelians is a name used to denote two related, yet different ethnic groups of Finnic-language speakers. ... Olonets-Karelian (East Karelian, Livvi) is the variety of Karelian language spoken by Olonets-Karelians, traditionally inhabiting the area of the Olonka River. ... The terms Finns and Finnish people are used both to refer to an ethnic group historically associated with Finland or Fennoscandia and to the present-day citizens or residents of Finland. ... The Ingrian Finns (inkeriläinen or inkerinsuomalainen) are an ethnic group who speak a dialect of Finnish language and have traditionally inhabited the area called Ingria (or Ingermanland, in Finnish: Inkeri) situated between what is now Saint Petersburg and the northeastern border of Estonia. ... The Tornedalians or Tornedalian Finns are members of Finnic peoples, traditionally speaking Meänkieli (which is widely considered to be a Finnish dialect). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Grue in Hedmark county, eastern Norway is the center for the Finnskogen minority culture Finnskogen (Forest of the Finns) is an area of Norway situated in the county of Hedmark, named so because of immigration of Finnish people in the 17th century, the so-called Skogfinner (Forest Finns). The core... Ingrians refer to the Finnic people that before the foundation of Saint Petersburg inhabited Ingria (east and south of the Gulf of Finland) Ingrian Finns (Lutherans) Izhorians (Orthodox) Categories: Finnic peoples ... The Tornedalians or Tornedalian Finns are members of Finnic peoples, traditionally speaking Meänkieli (which is widely considered to be a Finnish dialect). ... // People The Kveens (a. ... The Karelians is a name used to denote two related, yet different ethnic groups of Finnic-language speakers. ... East Finnish culture and language are chiefly vested in the Savonians and the Karelians. ...


The Northern Scandinavian and Northwestern Russian Samis, are only distantly related to the Finnic peoples. Sami flag The Sami People (there are other names and spellings including Sámi, Saami and Lapp) are an indigenous people of northern Sweden, Norway, Finland and Russia, covering a total area in the Nordic countries corresponding to the size of Sweden. ...


It is debated[12] whether the Chudes (mentioned by Jordanes 550 A.D.) were an unidentified Finnic tribe or whether a Finnic group might be considered to be the original Chudes. It has also been considered whether [[Russian language|Russian]] chud (чудь) is borrowed from Sami or vice versa. Chud is a term referring to urban homeless people, especially those who dwell in the tunnels, sewers and subway corridors beneath New York City. ... Events By Place Byzantine Empire Silk reaches Constantinople (approximate date). ... Sami is a general name for a group of Finno-Ugric languages spoken in parts of Norway, Sweden, Finland and Russia, in Northern Europe. ...


References

  1. ^ Christian Carpelan: On Archaeological Aspects of Uralic, Finno-Ugric and Finnic Societies before AD 800. The Slavicization of the Russian North. Edited by Jorma Koivulehto. Slavica helsingiensia 27. Helsinki 2006, pages 78 - 92

See also

The Fenni were a people described by Tacitus in his Germania. ... The terms Fennoscandia and Fenno-Scandinavia are used either to include the Scandinavian peninsula, the Kola peninsula, Karelia, Finland and Denmark under the same term alluding to the Fennoscandian Shield, even if Denmark actually resides on the North European Plain, or they may be used in a more cultural sense... Ugric languages or Ugrian languages are generally held to be a branch of Finno-Ugric languages. ... Map of Finland. ... This list is based solely on territory; the peoples listed here do not belong to a single language family or ethnicity: they are Finno-Ugric, Turkic, Eskimo-Aleut, and other groups. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for finnic (1109 words)
Among the Balto-Finnic peoples, a guardian spirit of the household.
Finno-Ugric Group of related languages spoken by more than 22 million people in Finland and n Norway, in Estonia and Karelia, in various areas at the n end of the River Volga and each side of the Ural Mountains, and in Hungary.
Finns, Karelians, Estonians and Volga-Finnic peoples, and the Indo-European-speaking...
HUNMAGYAR.ORG - TURAN - URALIC PEOPLES (2178 words)
Peoples belonging to the Uralic language family live in North Eurasia (Eastern and Northern Europe; Western Siberia), being the original inhabitants of these territories.
Although the following peoples are not directly threatened by assimilation, their national survival is in danger (because of their small number, dispersion, administrative territory, which does not correspond to their actual territory of habitation, unfavourable demographic situation or other reasons).
Of the Uralic peoples of Russia the Komis, Maris, Udmurts and Mordvins have the administrative unit of the highest rank in the Russian Federation republic (since 1936 Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic; before that Autonomous Province, which is legally all but equal with a province).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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