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Encyclopedia > Finnegans Wake
Finnegans Wake
Author James Joyce
Country France/Switzerland
Language English
Genre(s) Novel
Publisher Faber and Faber
Publication date 1924 to 1939
Media type Print (Hardback & Paperback)
ISBN ISBN 0-14-118126-5
Preceded by Ulysses
(1922)

Finnegans Wake, published in 1939, is James Joyce's final novel. Following the publication of Ulysses in 1922, Joyce began working on the Wake and by 1924 installments of the work began to appear in serialized form, first under the title "A New Unnamed Work" and subsequently as "Work in Progress." (The final title of the work remained a secret between the writer and his wife, Nora Barnacle, until shortly before the book was finally published.) Image File history File links Download high resolution version (429x696, 38 KB) Summary http://www. ... James Augustine Aloysius Joyce (Irish Séamus Seoighe; 2 February 1882 – 13 January 1941) was an Irish expatriate writer, widely considered to be one of the most influential writers of the 20th century. ... In political geography and international politics, a country is a political division of a geographical entity, a sovereign territory, most commonly associated with the notions of state or nation and government. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended, generally fictional narrative, typically in prose. ... A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. ... Faber and Faber is a celebrated publishing house in the UK, notable in particular for publishing the poetry of T. S. Eliot. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... ISBN-13 represented as EAN-13 bar code (in this case ISBN 978-3-16-148410-0) The International Standard Book Number, ISBN, is a unique[1] commercial book identifier barcode. ... Ulysses is a novel by James Joyce, first serialized in parts in the American journal The Little Review from March 1918 to December 1920, and then published in its entirety by Sylvia Beach on February 2, 1922, in Paris. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Finnegans Wake Finnegans Wake is a ballad which arose in perhaps the 1850s in the vaudeville tradition of comical Irish songs. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... James Augustine Aloysius Joyce (Irish Séamus Seoighe; 2 February 1882 – 13 January 1941) was an Irish expatriate writer, widely considered to be one of the most influential writers of the 20th century. ... Ulysses is a novel by James Joyce, first serialized in parts in the American journal The Little Review from March 1918 to December 1920, and then published in its entirety by Sylvia Beach on February 2, 1922, in Paris. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... Year 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


The seventeen years spent working on Finnegans Wake were often difficult for Joyce. He underwent frequent eye surgeries, lost long-time supporters, and dealt with personal problems in the lives of his children. These problems and the perennial financial difficulties of the Joyce family are described in Richard Ellmann's biography James Joyce. Richard Ellmann (March 15, 1918 - 1987) was a prominent literary critic and biographer of Irish writers such as James Joyce, Oscar Wilde, and William Butler Yeats. ... James Joyce by Richard Ellmann was published in 1959. ...

Contents

Plot summary

Because Joyce's sentences are packed with obscure allusions and puns in dozens of different languages, it remains impossible to offer an undisputed and definitive synopsis.


The book begins with one such allusion:

riverrun, past Eve and Adam's, from swerve of shore to bend of bay, brings us by a commodius vicus of recirculation back to Howth Castle and Environs.

"Commodius vicus" refers to Giambattista Vico (1668-1744). Vico believed in a theory of cyclical history. He believed that the world was coming to the end of the last of three ages, these being the age of gods, the age of heroes, and the age of humans. This opening also contributes to the effect of Joyce's novel as a whole, since it begins and ends with "riverrun" on the lips. Giambattista Vico or Giovanni Battista Vico (June 23, 1668 – January 23, 1744) was a Neapolitan philosopher, historian, and jurist. ... 1668 (MDCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... // Events The third French and Indian War, known as King Georges War, breaks out at Port Royal, Nova Scotia The First Saudi State founded by Mohammed Ibn Saud Prague occupied by Prussian armies Ongoing events War of the Austrian Succession (1740-1748) Births January 10 - Thomas Mifflin, fifth President...


More generally, the introductory chapter gives an overview of the novel's themes. First, we hear of a central character, here called Finnegan and identified as a hod carrier in Dublin (seen as representing all builders of all kinds throughout world history), falling to his death from a scaffold or tower or wall. At his wake, in keeping with the comic song "Finnegan's Wake" that provided Joyce's title, a fight breaks out, whiskey splashes on Finnegan's corpse, and he rises up again alive (Finnegan awakes). A hod is a tool used to carry bricks and mortar. ... This article is about the temporary framework. ... A wake is a ceremony associated with death. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Finnegans Wake Finnegans Wake is a ballad which arose in perhaps the 1850s in the vaudeville tradition of comical Irish songs. ...


This Finnegan is all men, and his fall is all men's fall. Subsequent vignettes in the first chapter show him as a warrior (in particular, as Wellington at Waterloo), as an explorer invading a land occupied by his aboriginal ancestors, and as the victim of a vengeful pirate queen (Grace O'Malley). In theater and script writing, vignettes are short, impressionistic scenes that focus on one moment or give one impression about a character, an idea, or a setting. ... Field Marshal Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, KG, GCB, GCH, PC, FRS (c. ... Waterloo The top of the knoll and the famous lion. ... The term indigenous people has no universal, standard or fixed definition, but can be used about any ethnic group who inhabit the geographic region with which they have the earliest historical connection. ... The meeting of Grace OMalley and Queen Elizabeth I Gráinne Ní Mháille (c. ...


At the end of chapter one, Joyce puts Finnegan back down again ("Now be aisy, good Mr Finnimore, sir. And take your laysure like a god on pension and don't be walking abroad"). A new version of Finnegan-Everyman is sailing into Dublin Bay to take over the story: Humphrey Chimpden Earwicker, whose initials HCE ("Here Comes Everybody") lend themselves to phrase after phrase throughout the book (Note they appear as "Howth Castle and Environs" in the opening sentence). In literature and drama, the term everyman has come to mean an ordinary individual, with whom the audience or reader is supposed to be able to identify, and who is often placed in extraordinary circumstances. ...


Chapter two opens with an account of how HCE was given the name "Earwicker" by the king, who catches HCE "earwigging" when he's supposed to be manning a tollgate. Although the name begins as an insult, it helps HCE rise to prominence in Dublin society, but then he's brought down by a rumor about a sexual trespass involving two girls in the Phoenix Park (close by Chapelizod). Families Suborder Archidermaptera extinct Suborder Forficulina Pygidicranidae Diplatyidae Anisolabididae Labiduridae Apachyidae Spongiphoridae Chelisochidae Forficulidae Suborder Hemimerina Hemimeridae Suborder Arixenina Arixeniidae This article is about the insect Earwig. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Deer grazing near the Papal Cross in the Phoenix Park Phoenix Park (in Irish, Páirc an Fhionn-Uisce) is a large park located 3 km to the north west of Dublin city centre in Ireland. ... Chapelizod is Ireland oldest villege. ...


Most of chapters two through four follow the progress of this rumor, starting with HCE's encounter with "a cad with a pipe." The cad asks the time, but HCE misunderstands it as either an accusation or a proposition, and incriminates himself by denying rumors the cad has not yet heard. Joyce expresses HCE's confusion by spelling the cad's Gaelic phonetically, making it look like a suggestive English phrase. Eventually, HCE becomes so paranoid he goes into hiding, where he'll write a book that evidently resembles Joyce's own Ulysses.


HCE is (at one level) a Scandinavian who has taken a native Irish wife, Anna Livia Plurabelle (whose initials ALP are also found in phrase after phrase). At some point these two have settled down to run a public house in Chapelizod, a suburb of Dublin named for the Irish princess Isolde. HCE personifies the city of Dublin (which was founded by Vikings), and ALP personifies the river Liffey, on whose banks the city was built. In the popular eighth chapter, hundreds of names of rivers are woven into the tale of ALP's life. Joyce universalizes his tale by making HCE and ALP stand, as well, for every city-river pair in the world. And they are, like Adam and Eve, the primeval parents of all the Irish and all humanity. Scandinavia is a historical and geographical region centered on the Scandinavian Peninsula in Northern Europe which includes the three kingdoms of Denmark, Norway and Sweden. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Chapelizod is Ireland oldest villege. ... Dublin city centre at night WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Leinster County: Dáil Éireann: Dublin Central, Dublin North Central, Dublin North East, Dublin North West, Dublin South Central, Dublin South East European Parliament: Dublin Dialling Code: +353 1 Postal District(s): D1-24, D6W Area: 114. ... In the Arthurian Legend of Tristan and Iseult (alternatively Isolde, Isode, Isotta, etc. ... The name Viking is a loan from the native Scandinavian term for the Norse seafaring warriors who raided the coasts of Scandinavia, Europe and the British Isles from the late 8th century to the 11th century, the period of European history referred to as the Viking Age. ... The Liffey in West Wicklow The Liffey (An Life in Irish) is a river in the Republic of Ireland, which flows through the centre of Dublin. ... Michelangelos Creation of Adam, from the Sistine Chapel. ...


ALP and HCE have a daughter, Issy, whose personality is often split, and two sons, Shem and Shaun, eternal rivals for replacing their father and for Issy's affection (among other things). Shem and Shaun are akin to Set and Horus of the Osiris story, as well as the biblical pairs Jacob & Esau and Cain & Abel, as well as Romulus & Remus and St. Michael & the Devil (Mick & Nick). In Egyptian mythology, Set (also spelled Sutekh, Setesh, Seteh) is an ancient god, who was originally the god of the desert, one of the two main biomes that constitutes Egypt, the other being the small fertile area on either side of the Nile. ... For other uses, see Horus (disambiguation). ... OSIRIS is the name of three entirely separate astronomical instruments. ... Jacob Wrestling with the Angel – Gustave Doré, 1855 Jacob or Yaakov, (Hebrew: יַעֲקֹב, Standard  Tiberian ; Arabic: يعقوب, ; holds the heel), also known as Israel (Hebrew: יִשְׂרָאֵל, Standard  Tiberian ; Arabic: اسرائيل, ; Struggled with God), is the third Biblical patriarch. ... Esau (Hebrew ‎, Standard Hebrew Esav, Tiberian Hebrew Ēśāw) is the oldest son of Isaac and Rebekah and the twin brother of Jacob in the biblical Book of Genesis. ... In stories common to the Abrahamic religions, Cain or Káyin (קַיִן / קָיִן spear Standard Hebrew Qáyin, Tiberian Hebrew Qáyin / Qāyin; Arabic قايين QāyÄ«n in the Arabic Bible; قابيل QābÄ«l in Islam) is the eldest son of Adam and Eve, and the first man born in creation... In the Book of Genesis, Abel (Hebrew הֶבֶל / הָבֶל, Standard Hebrew Hével / Hável, Tiberian Hebrew Héḇel / Hāḇel; Arabic هابيل HābÄ«l) was the second son of Adam. ... This page describes the ancient heroes who founded the city of Rome. ... Guido Renis archangel Michael (in the Capuchin church of Sta. ... Satan frozen at the center of Cocytus, the ninth circle of Hell in Dantes Inferno. ...


Shaun is portrayed as a dull postman, conforming to society's expectations, while Shem is a bright artist and sinister experimenter. (As HCE retreats before the rumors, he seems to transform into Shem, the artist who writes the book.) They are sometimes accompanied by a third personality in whom their twin poles are reconciled, called Tristan or Tristram. Presumably, by synthesizing their strengths, Tristan is able to win Issy and defeat/replace HCE, like Tristan in the triangle with Iseult (Issy) and King Mark (HCE). A Melbourne postie riding a motorbike A postwoman with her bicycle in China. ... Tristan and Iseult as depicted by Herbert Draper (1864 -1920). ... Tristan and Iseult as depicted by Herbert Draper (1863–1920). ...


The book also draws heavily on Irish mythology with HCE sometimes corresponding to Finn MacCool, Issy and ALP to Grania, and Shem/Shaun to Dermot (Diarmaid). This is just a small hint of the many roles that each of the main characters finds him or herself playing, often several at the same time. The mythology of pre-Christian Ireland did not entirely survive the conversion to Christianity, but much of it was preserved, shorn of its religious meanings, in medieval Irish literature, which represents the most extensive and best preserved of all the branches of Celtic mythology. ... Fionn mac Cumhaill (pronounced /fʲiːn̪ˠ mË ak kuwaːlʲ/ in Irish or /fɪn mɘ kuːl/ in English) (earlier Finn or Find mac Cumail or mac Umaill, later Anglicised to Finn McCool) was a mythical hunter-warrior of Irish mythology, occurring also in the mythologies of Scotland... In Irish mythology, Gráinne was the daughter of Cormac mac Airt. ...


The book is transformed into a letter, dictated to Shem by ALP, entrusted to Shaun for delivery, but somehow ending up in a midden heap, where it is dug up by a hen named Biddy (the diminutive form of Brighid, which is the name of both a saint and a goddess on whose feast day Joyce was born). The letter is perhaps an indictment, perhaps an exoneration of HCE, just as Finnegans Wake is a vast "comedy" that seeks to indict and simultaneously redeem human history. Kitchen midden at Elizabeth Island, Strait of Magellan as excavated by the Albatross party with the Albatross at anchor. ... In Irish mythology as it is presently constituted, Brigit or Brighit (exalted one) was the daughter of the Dagda (and therefore one of the Tuatha Dé Danann) and wife of Bres of the Fomorians. ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with a saint, and referring to the day as the saints day of that saint. ...


If HCE can also be identified with Charles Stewart Parnell, Shem's attack mirrors the attempt of forger Richard Piggott to incriminate Parnell in the Phoenix Park Murders of 1882 by means of false letters. But Piggott is also HCE, for just as HCE betrays himself to the cad, Piggott betrayed himself at the inquiry into admitting the forgery by his spelling of the word "hesitancy" as "hesitency"; and this misspelling appears frequently in the Wake. Charles Stewart Parnell, the uncrowned King of Ireland Charles Stewart Parnell[1] (27 June 1846 – 6 October 1891) was an Irish political leader and one of the most important figures in 19th century Ireland and the United Kingdom; William Ewart Gladstone described him as the most remarkable person he had... Richard Piggott was a journalist for The Times and he was well known for the piggott forgeries. ... The term Phoenix Park Murders is used to refer to the assassination in 1882 of the second and third in command of the British Dublin Castle government of Ireland by the Irish National Invincibles. ... Year 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Tavern Scene from A Rakes Progress by William Hogarth. ...


The progress of the book is far from simple as it draws on mythology, theology, mystery, philosophy, history, sociology, astrology, other fiction, alchemy, music, colour, nature, sexuality, human development, and dozens of languages to create the world drama in whose cycles we live. The word mythology (from the Greek μυολογία mythología, from mythologein to relate myths, from mythos, meaning a narrative, and logos, meaning speech or argument) literally means the (oral) retelling of myths – stories that a particular culture believes to be true and that use the supernatural to interpret natural events and... Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... The philosopher Socrates about to take poison hemlock as ordered by the court. ... The title page to The Historians History of the World. ... Sociology (from Latin: socius, companion; and the suffix -ology, the study of, from Greek λόγος, lógos, knowledge) is an academic and applied discipline that studies society and human social interaction. ... Hand-coloured version of the anonymous Flammarion woodcut (1888). ... An illustration from Lewis Carrolls Alices Adventures in Wonderland, depicting the fictional protagonist, Alice, playing a fantastical game of croquet. ... For other uses, see Alchemy (disambiguation). ... // Music is an art form consisting of sound and silence expressed through time. ... Color is an important part of the visual arts. ... “Natural” redirects here. ... This article is about human sexual perceptions. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ...


The book ends with the river Liffey disappearing at dawn into the vast possibilities of the ocean. The last sentence is incomplete. As well as leaving the reader to complete it with his or her own life, it can be closed by the sentence that starts the book--another cycle. Thus, reading the final sentence of the book, and continuing on to the first sentence of the book, it is: "A way a lone a last a loved a long the / riverrun, past Eve and Adam's, from swerve of shore to bend of bay, brings us by a commodius vicus of recirculation back to Howth Castle and Environs."


Characters in "Finnegans Wake"

The family

  • Humphrey Chimpden Earwicker – (or HCE) an Irish publican, possibly a reincarnation of Finnegan, the hod carrier of the street ballad who falls at the start of the novel
  • Anna Livia Plurabelle – (or ALP) HCE's wife
  • Shem & Shaun (or Jerry and Kevin, also known by many other names) - the sons of HCE and ALP
  • Issy, Iseult (or Isolde), Isabel, daughter of HCE and ALP

The minor character of "Mr Browne the Jesuit" was based on Francis Browne, a classmate of Joyce's at Royal University. Browne later distinguished himself as an important photographer (best known for taking the last known photographs of RMS Titanic) and Jesuit preacher. A hod is a tool used to carry bricks and mortar. ... Francis M. Browne, SJ (January 3, 1880 - July 7, 1960) was a distinguished member of the Jesuit order in Ireland and an avid photographer. ... The Royal University of Ireland was founded in accordance with the University Education (Ireland) Act 1879 as an examination and degree awarding university based on the model of the University of London. ... RMS Titanic was a British Olympic class passenger liner that became famous for her collision with an iceberg on 14 April 1912 and dramatic sinking on 15 April 1912. ...


Literary significance & criticism

The value of Finnegans Wake as a work of literature has been a point of contention since the time of its appearance, in serial form, in literary reviews of the 1920s (primarily the journal transition, edited by Eugene Jolas). Some admirers of Joyce's Ulysses were disappointed that none of its characters reappeared in the new work, and that the author's linguistic experiments were making it increasingly difficult to pick out any continuous thread of a plot. Some literary figures believed the book to be a joke, pulled by Joyce on the literary community. Joyce's brother Stanislaus "rebuked him for writing an incomprehensible night-book".[1] Literary critic and friend of the author Oliver Gogarty called it "the most colossal leg pull in literature since Macpherson's Ossian".[2] When Ezra Pound was asked his opinion on the text, he wrote "Nothing so far as I make out, nothing short of divine vision or a new cure for the clapp can possibly be worth all the circumambient peripherization."[3] The journal transition was founded in 1927 by poet Eugene Jolas and his wife Maria McDonald along with editors Elliot Paul, Robert Sage & Stuart Gilbert, Caresse Crosby & Harry Crosby did some editing as well. ... Eugene Jolas (1894-1952) was a writer, translator and literary critic. ... Ulysses is a novel by James Joyce, first serialized in parts in the American journal The Little Review from March 1918 to December 1920, and then published in its entirety by Sylvia Beach on February 2, 1922, in Paris. ... Stanislaus Joyce (December 17, 1884-June 16, 1955), teacher, scholar, and writer; brother of James Joyce. ... Oliver St John Gogarty (August 17, 1878-September 22, 1957) was an Irish physician and surgeon, who was also a poet and writer, one of the most prominent Dublin wits, and for some time a political figure of the Irish Free State. ... James Macpherson (October 27, 1736–February 17, 1796), was a Scottish poet, known as the translator of the Ossian cycle of poems (also known as the Oisín cycle). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Oisín. ... Ezra Pound in 1913. ... Gonorrhoea (gonorrhea in American English) is among the most common sexually-transmitted diseases in the world and is caused by Penis penis Neisseria penis. ...


In response to such criticisms, Transition published essays throughout the late 1920s, defending and explaining Joyce's work. In 1929, these essays (along with a few others written for the occasion) were collected under the title Our Exagmination Round His Factification for Incamination of Work in Progress and published by Shakespeare and Company. This collection featured Samuel Beckett's first published work (entitled "Dante... Bruno. Vico.. Joyce") along with essays by William Carlos Williams, Stuart Gilbert, Marcel Brion, Eugene Jolas and others. The journal transition was founded in 1927 by poet Eugene Jolas and his wife Maria McDonald along with editors Elliot Paul, Robert Sage & Stuart Gilbert, Caresse Crosby & Harry Crosby did some editing as well. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Our Exagmination Round His Factification for Incamination of Work in Progress is a collection of critical essays on the subject of James Joyces Finnegans Wake. ... Shakespeare and Company store, Paris, 2004 Shakespeare and Company, is an independent bookstore located in the 5th arrondissement of Pariss Left Bank. ... Samuel Barclay Beckett (13 April 1906 – 22 December 1989) was an Irish dramatist, novelist and poet. ... William Carlos Williams Dr. William Carlos Williams (sometimes known as WCW) (September 17, 1883 – March 4, 1963), was an American poet closely associated with modernism and Imagism. ... Stuart Gilbert (1883 – 1969) was an English literary scholar and translator. ... Eugene Jolas (1894-1952) was a writer, translator and literary critic. ...


The actual publication of the novel was somewhat overshadowed by Europe's descent into World War II. Joyce died just two years after the novel was published, leaving a work whose interpretation is still very much "in progress." Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


In the time since Joyce's death, many leading literary critics have struggled against public perception of the novel in order to establish for Finnegans Wake a preeminent place in English literature: in 1957 Northrop Frye described Finnegans Wake as the “chief ironic epic of our time” (Anatomy of Criticism 323); in the 1960s, Jacques Derrida developed his ideas of literary "deconstruction" largely inspired by Finnegans Wake (as detailed in the essay "Two Words for Joyce"); and in 1994, in The Western Canon, Harold Bloom wrote of Finnegans Wake that "[i]f aesthetic merit were ever again to center the canon [it] would be as close as our chaos could come to the heights of Shakespeare and Dante." Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Herman Northrop Frye, CC, MA, D.Litt. ... Jacques Derrida (July 15, 1930 – October 8, 2004) was an Algerian-born French philosopher, known as the founder of deconstruction. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ... Harold Bloom (b. ...


In 1998, the Modern Library placed Finnegans Wake amongst its list of "Top 100 English-language novels of the twentieth century." (It came seventy-seventh.) Martin Amis has dismissed it, however, as a '600-page crossword clue'; he sometimes adds, 'Whose answer is "The".' Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Photo of Martin Amis by Robert Birnbaum Martin Amis (born August 25, 1949) is an English novelist. ... A crossword is a word puzzle that normally takes the form of a square grid of black and white squares. ...


The former Ten Pound Banknotes of the Republic of Ireland presented a quote of the book's first sentence. The Series C Banknotes of the Republic of Ireland where the final series of notes created for the state before the advent of the Euro, it replaced Series B Banknotes. ...


Language and style

Many find the language of Finnegans Wake confounding, as in the following:

O here here how hoth sprowled met the duskt the father of fornicationists but, (O my shining stars and body!) how hath fanespanned most high heaven the skysign of soft advertisement! (page 4, lines 11–14)

One of the many sources Joyce drew from is the Ancient Egyptian story of Osiris, who was torn apart by his brother or son Set, and the pieces were gathered and reassembled by his sister or wife, Isis, with the help of their sister or daughter Nephthys. In this narrative, their other brother or son, Horus, emerges to slay Set and rise as the new day's sun, as Osiris himself. Osiris's night journey through the otherworld is described in the Egyptian Book of the Dead, a collection of spells and invocations to enable the recently deceased to join Osiris and rise with the sun. This article contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... OSIRIS is the name of three entirely separate astronomical instruments. ... Set, in KV34 Set (also Setekh, Seth, etc) was originally a god of strength, war, storms, foreign lands (and foreigners) and deserts in Egyptian mythology. ... Isis is a goddess in Egyptian mythology. ... In Egyptian mythology, Nephthys (spelt Nebet-het, and Nebt-het, in transliteration from Egyptian hieroglyphs) is one of the Ennead of Heliopolis, a daughter of Nut and Geb, and the wife of Set. ... For other uses, see Horus (disambiguation). ... The Book of the Dead comd A Section of Plate 3 from the Papyrus of Ani. ...


Allusions/references in other works

Literature

  • In Tom Robbins's Fierce Invalids Home from Hot Climates, the main character, Switters, makes constant references to Finnegans Wake throughout the novel.
  • Sylvia Plath's The Bell Jar features a protagonist contending with Finnegans Wake - indeed, Esther Greenwood's reading of its first pages seems to presage her emotional deterioration.
  • Finnegans Wake is mentioned several times in James Blish's science fiction novel A Case of Conscience, where it plays a significant role in the solution to the novel's "case of conscience". Blish also quoted Finnegans Wake in his Star Trek novel Spock Must Die! .
  • The influence of Finnegans Wake can also be seen in Philip José Farmer's science fiction novella Riders of the Purple Wage, which is written in a Joycean style and includes a central character named Finnegan, as well as referring explicitly to Joyce's novel.
  • Argentinian major writer and Princeton professor of Latin American literature Ricardo Piglia includes a Joycean short story called "La Isla" in his book "Cuentos Morales". The story also appears as a chapter of his postmodern fiction "Ciudad Ausente" under the title "La Isla de Finnegan".
  • In Raymond Queneau's We Always Treat Women Too Well, the IRA members are mostly named after minor characters in Ulysses, and use the password Finnegan's Wake.
  • Jon Stewart's America (The Book) lists Finnegans Wake as a sign that Europe is in decline, with the explanatory caption "More unreadable by the hour."
  • In Charles Willeford's High Priest of California, the central character Russell Haxby mentions unwinding after a day of mischief by rewriting passages of Finnegan's Wake (and Ulysses) in plain and simple language.
  • In Philip K. Dick's The Divine Invasion, the character Herb Asher declares James Joyce to have the ability to see the future. This character uses various sections from Finnegans Wake to prove his point.

Tom Robbins at a reading of Wild Ducks Flying Backward in San Francisco on September 24, 2005 Thomas Eugene Robbins (born July 22, 1936 in Blowing Rock, North Carolina) is an American author. ... Fierce Invalids Home From Hot Climates is Tom Robbins seventh and biggest novel. ... Sylvia Plath (October 27, 1932 – February 11, 1963) was an American poet, novelist, and short story writer. ... The Bell Jar is Sylvia Plaths only novel, which was originally published under the pseudonym Victoria Lucas in 1963. ... James Benjamin Blish (East Orange, New Jersey, May 23, 1921 – Henley-on-Thames, July 30, 1975) was an American author of fantasy and science fiction. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... A Case of Conscience is a science fiction novel by James Blish, first published in 1959. ... The starship Enterprise as it appeared on Star Trek Star Trek is a culturally significant science fiction television series created by Gene Roddenberry in the 1960s. ... Spock Must Die! (ISBN 0553246348) is a non-canonical Star Trek novel by James Blish released in 1970. ... Philip José Farmer (born January 26, 1918) is an American author, principally known for his science fiction and fantasy novels and short stories. ... Riders of the Purple Wage was a science fiction novella by Philip José Farmer. ... A text is deemed Joycean when it is reminiscent of the writings of James Joyce, particularly Ulysses and whatever portion of Finnegans Wake the person using the word has actually read. ... Ricardo Piglia (born on November 24, 1941 in Adrogué) is an Argentine writer best known for his 1992 novel The Absent City. Heavely influenced by countryman Jorge Luis Borges, Piglias stories contain elements of the occult, while still heavily grounded in the reality of their metafictional narratives. ... Raymond Queneau (February 21, 1903 – October 25, 1976) was a French poet and novelist. ... Jon Stewart (born Jonathan Stuart Leibowitz on November 28, 1962) is an American comedian, satirist, actor, writer, author, and producer. ... America (The Book): A Citizens Guide to Democracy Inaction (ISBN 0-446-53268-1) is a 2004 humor book written and edited by Jon Stewart, Ben Karlin, David Javerbaum, and other writers of The Daily Show. ... Charles Willeford Charles Willeford was born 2 January 1919 in Little Rock, Arkansas. ... Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982) was an American writer, mostly known for his works of science fiction. ... The Divine Invasion is a 1981 science fiction book by Philip K. Dick. ...

Music

  • John Cage's Roaratorio: an Irish circus on Finnegans wake takes words from the text and rearranges them in poetic form. The text is Cage's Writing for the Second Time through Finnegans Wake, one of a series of five writings that he did based on the Wake. He also set texts from the book as songs, including The Wonderful Widow of Eighteen Springs and Nowth Upon Nacht.
  • Stephen Albert's Symphony No. 1, subtitled 'Riverrun' after the 1st word in Joyce's novel, is a Pulitzer Prize winner.
  • Toru Takemitsu composed a piece called 'A way a lone', after the last sentence in Joyce's novel.
  • Experimental musicians Current 93 begin the extremely brief "Be", opener to Side B of the album Imperium, with the line "from swerve of shore, to bend of bay".
  • The musical group Sleepytime Gorilla Museum released a song called "Helpless Corpses Enactment" on their album In Glorious Times. The lyrics are quotations from Finnegans Wake, primarily the "Recorso" chapter.
  • Ronnie Drew of Irish trad band The Dubliners did an à capella rendering of a passage from Finnegans Wake entitled "Humpty Dumpty", an allegorical passage about the fall of Man. Drew introduces the piece by saying "James Joyce is renowned for having written some very very complicated material. Surprisingly he wrote the next song, which is very simple." This is presumably meant to be ironic, as the passage is extremely complicating and confusing, referencing Oliver Cromwell, Mountjoy Jail, the Immaculate Conception, Cain and Abel and Vikings. [1]

For the Mortal Kombat character, see Johnny Cage. ... Stephen Albert (1941-1992) was an American composer. ... Tōru Takemitsu (武満 徹 Takemitsu Tōru, October 8, 1930 - February 20, 1996) was a Japanese composer of music, who explored the compositional principles of Western classical music and his native Japanese tradition both in isolation and in combination. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Sleepytime Gorilla Museum (often abbreviated to SGM) are an American avant-rock band, formed in 1999 in Oakland, California. ... In Glorious Times is the third studio album by avant-rock band Sleepytime Gorilla Museum. ... Ronnie Drew on stage at Lorient, Brittany in 2004 Ronnie Drew, an Irish singer and folk musician, was born in Dublin on 16 September 1934. ... The Dubliners are an Irish folk band founded in 1962, making them one of the older bands still playing music today. ... Oliver Cromwell (25 April 1599 – 3 September 1658) was an English military and political leader best known for his involvement in making England, Scotland and Ireland into a republican Commonwealth and for the brutal war exercised in his conquest of Ireland. ... Mountjoy Prison is a closed medium security prison located in Phibsboro in Dublin city centre, Ireland. ... Mary, mother of Jesus as the Immaculate Conception. ... According to the Holy Bible and the Quran, Cain and Abel were the first and second sons of Adam and Eve, born after the Fall of Man (the only other child of Adam and Eve to be named in the Bible was Seth). ... The name Viking is a loan from the native Scandinavian term for the Norse seafaring warriors who raided the coasts of Scandinavia, Europe and the British Isles from the late 8th century to the 11th century, the period of European history referred to as the Viking Age. ...

Film

  • In the movie Enough, Jennifer Lopez's character mentions that the book, "is the hardest book to read in the English language" and she has been reading it for 6 years, though she says later it was not true.

For other uses, see Enough (disambiguation). ... “J. Lo” redirects here. ...

Others

  • Marshall McLuhan calls the extremely long portmanteaux that occur throughout Finnegans Wake the "Ten Thunders" and uses them to support the claim that Finnegans Wake is a giant cryptogram narrating the whole of human history.
  • The phrase "Three quarks for Muster Mark" on page 383 of Finnegans Wake is the origin of the name given by physicist Murray Gell-Mann to quarks, a type of subatomic particle.[4] (In the novel, the phrase is sung by a chorus of seabirds, and probably means 'three cheers' or--judging from Joyce's notes--three jeers.)
  • In the Roleplaying Game Trinity exists a psionic order called ISRA practising clairsentience. In this order exists a faction called Joyceans, which think that Finnegans Wake is a "perfect representation of the psionic universe" and muchly studied by this faction (although not exclusively)

“McLuhan” redirects here. ... A portmanteau (plural: portmanteaux or portmanteaus) is a word that is formed by combining two words. ... For the plants which reproduce by using spores, see Cryptogam. ... Not to be confused with physician, a person who practices medicine. ... Murray Gell-Mann (born September 15, 1929 in Manhattan, New York City, USA) is an American physicist who received the 1969 Nobel Prize in physics for his work on the theory of elementary particles. ... The six flavours of quarks and their most likely decay modes. ... A subatomic particle is a particle smaller than an atom: it may be elementary or composite. ... Trinity is a science fiction roleplaying game published by White Wolf Game Studio in 1998 (and later by the ArtHouse imprint), first in the Trinity Universe series of games (the two others being Aberrant and Adventure!) sharing a common background and developing an alternate history of humanity through two centuries... Clairsentience (From the French clair, “clear,” + sentience, “feeling,” ultimately derived from the Latin clarus, “clear,” + sentiens, derived from sentire, “to feel”) is a form of extra-sensory perception wherein a person acquires psychic knowledge primarily by means of feeling. ...

Adaptations

  • Jean Erdman's 1962 musical play The Coach with the Six Insides, is based upon Finnegans Wake [2]. The title is a line from the text, found in episode II.3.359 [3].
  • Singer Phil Minton set texts from the book to create the album mouthfull of ecstasy.

Mary Manning wrote a play version - Passages from Finnegans Wake - which was made into a film by Mary Ellen Bute. See also Jean Erdman, Baron Dieskau. ...

  • Italian singer Pippo Pollina wrote a song called "Finnegans wake", published in the album "Rossocuore", performed with another Italian singer called "Franco Battiato"
  • Danish visual artists Michael Kvium and Christian Lemmerz made a multimedia project called "the Wake" based on the book. It's an 8 hour long silent movie and the visual style is ferverish, dream-like.[http://www.wake.dk/indexw2.lasso?d=24

"The Wake"]

  • The former Ten Pound Banknotes of the Republic of Ireland presented a quote of the book's first sentence : riverrun, past Eve and Adam's, from swerve of shore to bend of bay, brings us by a commodius vicus of recirculation back to Howth Castle and Environs.

The Series C Banknotes of the Republic of Ireland where the final series of notes created for the state before the advent of the Euro, it replaced Series B Banknotes. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Ellmann, p. 603.
  2. ^ Quoted by Ellmann, p. 722, from "the Observer, May 7, 1939".
  3. ^ Ellmann, p. 584, from a letter from Pound to Joyce, dated Nov, 15, 1926.
  4. ^ M. Gell-Mann (1964). "A schematic model of baryons and mesons". Phys. Lett. 8: 214-215. 

References

Samuel Barclay Beckett (13 April 1906 – 22 December 1989) was an Irish dramatist, novelist and poet. ... William Carlos Williams Dr. William Carlos Williams (sometimes known as WCW) (September 17, 1883 – March 4, 1963), was an American poet closely associated with modernism and Imagism. ... Our Exagmination Round His Factification for Incamination of Work in Progress is a collection of critical essays on the subject of James Joyces Finnegans Wake. ... Anthony Burgess (February 25, 1917 – November 22, 1993) was a British novelist, critic and composer. ... 1975 Harcourt edition Joysprick: An Introduction to the Language of James Joyce is a work of literary criticism by Anthony Burgess. ... Joseph John Campbell (March 26, 1904 – October 31, 1987) was an American mythology professor, writer, and orator best known for his work in the fields of comparative mythology and comparative religion. ... Henry Morton Robinson (born September 7, 1898–died January 13, 1961) was an American novelist, best known for his 1950 novel The Cardinal, which was adapted to an Academy Award nominated film in 1963. ... A Skeleton Key to Finnegans Wake (1944) by mythologist Joseph Campbell and Henry Morton Robinson is an important work of literary criticism. ... Richard Ellmann (March 15, 1918 - 1987) was a prominent literary critic and biographer of Irish writers such as James Joyce, Oscar Wilde, and William Butler Yeats. ... James Joyce by Richard Ellmann was published in 1959. ... Robert Anton Wilson Robert Anton Wilson or RAW (January 18, 1932 – January 11, 2007) was a prolific American novelist, essayist, philosopher, psychologist, futurologist, anarchist, and conspiracy theory researcher. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
  • Etext of Finnegans Wake
  • Annotated version of Finnegans Wake
  • Online shorter Finnegans Wake
  • Online really short Finnegans Wake
  • Editions of Finnegans Wake
  • The James Joyce Scholars' Collection includes etexts of several works of Wakean scholarship.
  • Finnegans Wiki, an ambitious project to Wiki the Wake
  • "Icon O Graphing Finnegans Wake" is a visual fable based on James Joyce’s novel "Finnegans Wake" by Toronto artist Boris Dimitrov.
  • Terrance Mckenna lecture 'Surfing Finnegan's Wake'
  • "Genesis, Geniuses, and Guinesses," The Common Review, Fall 2005, pg. 58: a pop-culture gloss for effective reading, with headings based on Nirvana's "Smells Like Teen Spirit"
James Joyce
Novels: A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man | Ulysses | Finnegans Wake

Short stories: Dubliners | Play: Exiles | Poetry: Chamber Music | Pomes Penyeach Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ... James Augustine Aloysius Joyce (Irish Séamus Seoighe; 2 February 1882 – 13 January 1941) was an Irish expatriate writer, widely considered to be one of the most influential writers of the 20th century. ... A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man is a semi-autobiographical novel by James Joyce, first serialized in The Egoist from 1914 to 1915 and published in book form in 1916. ... Ulysses is a novel by James Joyce, first serialized in parts in the American journal The Little Review from March 1918 to December 1920, and then published in its entirety by Sylvia Beach on February 2, 1922, in Paris. ... For the Irish folk band, see The Dubliners. ... Exiles is a play by James Joyce, who is principally remembered for his novels. ... A collection of poems by James Joyce, published by Elkin Matthews in May, 1907. ... Pomes Penyeach is a collection of thirteen short poems, written over a twenty-year period from 1904 to 1924 by the novelist James Joyce and originally published on 7th July 1927 by Shakespeare and Co. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Finnegans Wake - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2487 words)
Finnegans Wake, published in 1939, is James Joyce's final novel.
Finnegans Wake is mentioned several times in James Blish's science fiction novel A Case of Conscience, where it plays a significant role in the solution to the novels' eponymous "case of conscience".
The influence of Finnegans Wake can also be seen in Philip José Farmer's science fiction novella Riders of the Purple Wage, which is written in a Joycean style and includes a central character named Finnegan, as well as referring explicitly to Joyce's novel.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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