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Encyclopedia > Fine art

Fine art refers to arts that are "concerned with beauty or which appealed to taste" (SOED 1991). The term was first attested in 1767, as a translation from the French term beaux arts and designates a limited number of visual art forms, including painting, sculpture, architecture and printmaking. Schools, institutes, and other organizations still use the term to indicate a traditional perspective on the visual arts, often implying an association with classic or academic art. Many see natural beauty in the rose. ... Taste can refer to ones appreciation for aesthetic quality. ... 1767 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Painter redirects here. ... why hello hello Sculptor redirects here. ... Printmaking is the process of making artworks by printing, normally on paper. ... Birth of Venus, Alexandre Cabanel, 1863 Academic art is a style of painting and sculpture produced under the influence of European academies or universities. ...


The word "fine" does not so much denote the quality of the artwork in question, but the purity of the discipline. This definition tends to exclude visual art forms that could be considered craftwork or applied art, such as textiles. The more recent term visual arts is widely considered to be a more inclusive and descriptive phrase for today's variety of current art practices, and for the multitude of mediums in which high art is now more widely recognized to occur. Ultimately, the term fine in 'fine art' comes from the concept of Final Cause, or purpose, or end, in the philosophy of Aristotle. The Final Cause of fine art is the art object itself; it is not a means to another end except perhaps to please those who behold it. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Applied art. ... Example of a cup figuring a tortise. ... This article is about the type of fabric. ... Purpose is deliberately thought-through goal-directedness. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... Aristotle (Greek: Aristotélēs) (384 BC – March 7, 322 BC) was a Greek philosopher, a student of Plato and teacher of Alexander the Great. ...


The term is still often used outside of the arts to denote when someone has perfected an activity to a very high level of skill. For example, one might metaphorically say that "PelĂ© took football to the level of a fine art." Edson Arantes do Nascimento, KBE (born October 23, 1940 in Três Corações, Brazil), best known by his nickname Pelé, is a former Brazilian football player, and widely regarded to be the greatest of all time. ... Football (soccer) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ...


That fine art is seen as being distinct from applied arts is largely the result of an issue raised in Britain by the conflict between the followers of the Arts and Crafts Movement, including William Morris, and the early modernists, including Virginia Woolf and the Bloomsbury Group. The former sought to bring socialist principles to bear on the arts by including the more commonplace crafts of the masses within the realm of the arts, while the modernists sought to keep artistic endeavour exclusive, esoteric, and elitist. Example of a cup figuring a tortise. ... Artichoke wallpaper, by John Henry Dearle for William Morris & Co. ... William Morris, socialist and innovator in the Arts and Crafts movement William Morris, publisher Davids Charge to Solomon (1882), a stained-glass window by Edward Burne-Jones and William Morris in Trinity Church, Boston, Massachusetts. ... This article focuses on the cultural movement labeled modernism or the modern movement. See also: Modernism (Roman Catholicism) or Modernist Christianity; Modernismo for specific art movement(s) in Spain and Catalonia. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Bloomsbury Group or Bloomsbury Set or just Bloomsbury, as its adherents would generally refer to it, was an English group of artists and scholars that existed from around 1905 until around World War II. // History The group began as an informal socialwe have been great to society assembly of... This article focuses on the cultural movement labeled modernism or the modern movement. See also: Modernism (Roman Catholicism) or Modernist Christianity; Modernismo for specific art movement(s) in Spain and Catalonia. ... Elitism is the belief or attitude that the people who are considered to be the elite — a selected group of persons with outstanding personal abilities, wealth, specialised training or experience, or other distinctive attributes — are the people whose views on a matter are to be taken the most seriously, or...


An academic course of study in fine art may include a Master of Fine Arts degree. For alternate uses, see MFA (disambiguation). ...


Types of fine art

The Parthenon on top of the Acropolis, Athens, Greece Architecture (from Latin, architectura and ultimately from Greek, αρχιτεκτων, a master builder, from αρχι- chief, leader and τεκτων, builder, carpenter) is the art and science of designing buildings and structures. ... Ceramics is the art form that uses ceramic materials to produce works of art. ... For other uses, see Dance (disambiguation). ... Drawing (verb) is the act of making marks on a surface so as to create a visual image of a form or a shape. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... Fine art photography, sometimes simply called art photography, refers to high-quality archival photographic prints of pictures that are created to fulfill the creative vision of an individual professional. ... A Shaker rocker, or rocking chair. ... For the hypertext system, see Intermedia (hypertext) Intermedia was a concept employed in the mid-sixties by Fluxus artist Dick Higgins to describe the ineffable, often confusing, inter-disciplinary activities that occur between genres that became prevalent in the 1960s. ... Old book bindings at the Merton College library. ... Allegory of Music on the Opéra Garnier Music is an art form that involves organized and audible sounds and silence. ... The Teatro alla Scala in Milan. ... Painter redirects here. ... Printmaking is the process of making artworks by printing, normally on paper. ... why hello hello Sculptor redirects here. ... This article is about the type of fabric. ... Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ...

See also

The term contemporary art refers to either the visual arts being practiced in the present day or, more broadly, art made from the late 1960s into the 21st century. ... The Parthenons facade showing an interpretation of golden rectangles in its proportions. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ...

External links

  • The Metropolitan Museum of Art Art History Timeline

  Results from FactBites:
 
Fineart.co.uk (109 words)
The Guild represents the art and framing industry and is its voice to government, the media and other agencies.
Use the Fine Art Trade Guild to promote your business to the trade or to consumers via this website or the Guild publications.
The Fine Art Trade Guild sets and maintains industry standards for the benefit of Members and their customers.
Fine art - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (408 words)
The more recent term "visual art" is widely considered to be a more inclusive and descriptive phrase for today's variety of current art practices, and for the multitude of mediums in which high art is now more widely recognized to occur.
That fine art is seen as being distinct from applied arts is largely the result of an issue raised in Britain by the conflict between the followers of the Arts and Crafts Movement, including William Morris, and the early modernists, including Virginia Woolf and the Bloomsbury Group.
The former sought to bring socialist principles to bear on the arts by including the more commonplace crafts of the masses within the realm of the arts, while the modernists sought to keep artistic endeavour exclusive, esoteric, and elitist.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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