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Encyclopedia > Fine Gael
Fine Gael
Leader Enda Kenny
Founded 3 September 1933
Headquarters 51 Upper Mount Street,
Dublin 2
Political Ideology Christian democracy, Centrism
International Affiliation Centrist Democrat International
European Affiliation European People's Party
European Parliament Group European People's Party–European Democrats
Colours Blue
Website www.finegael.ie
See also Politics of Ireland

Political parties
Elections in Ireland Image File history File links Fine_Gael_logo. ... For the Australian singer of the same name, see Enda Kenny (singer) Enda Kenny (Irish: ; born 24 April 1951), an Irish politician, is the 10th leader of the Fine Gael party and Leader of the Opposition in Dáil Éireann. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ... Christian democracy is a diverse political ideology and movement. ... In politics, centrism usually refers to the political ideal of promoting moderate policies which land in the middle ground between different political extremes. ... The Christian Democrat International (CDI) was formerly known as the Christian Democrat and Peoples Parties International. ... The European Peoples Party (EPP) is the largest transnational European political party. ... The European Peoples Party (Christian Democrats) and European Democrats is a group in the European Parliament. ... This article is about the colour. ... Politics of Ireland (the Republic of Ireland) takes place in a framework of a parliamentary representative democratic republic, whereby the Taoiseach (Prime Minister) is the head of government, and of a pluriform multi-party system. ... There are a number of political parties in the Republic of Ireland, and coalition governments are common. ... The Republic of Ireland elects on national level a head of state - the president - and a legislature. ...

Fine Gael – The United Ireland Party, shortened to Fine Gael (pronounced [ˌfina gail], meaning Family of the Irish or Tribe of the Irish,[1]) is the second largest political party in the Republic of Ireland. It claims a membership of 30,000,[2] and is the largest opposition party in the Oireachtas, the Irish parliament. A political party is a political organization that seeks to attain political power within a government, usually by participating in electoral campaigns. ... Parliamentary Opposition is a form of political opposition to a designated government, particularly in a Westminster-based parliamentary system. ... The Oireachtas is the National Parliament of the Republic of Ireland. ...


Fine Gael was founded in 1933 following the merger of its parent party Cumann na nGaedhael, the Centre Party and the Army Comrades Association, popularly known as the "Blueshirts".[3] Its origins lie in the struggle for Irish independence and the pro-Treaty side in the Irish Civil War, identifying in particular Michael Collins as the founder of the movement.[4] Cumann na nGaedhael (IPA: ; Society of the Gaels), sometimes spelt Cumann na nGaedheal,[1] was an Irish language name given to two Irish political parties, the second of which had the greater impact. ... The Centre Party was a political party in the Irish Free State in the early 1930s. ... The Army Comrades Association (ACA), better known by its nickname The Blueshirts, was an Irish organisation set up by former police commissioner General Eoin ODuffy in the 1930s. ... The Army Comrades Association (ACA), better known by its nickname The Blueshirts, was an Irish organisation set up by former police commissioner and army General Eoin ODuffy in the 1930s. ... Combatants Irish Republic United Kingdom Commanders Michael Collins Richard Mulcahy Cathal Brugha Important local IRA leaders Henry Hugh Tudor Strength Irish Republican Army c. ... Signature page of the Anglo-Irish Treaty The Anglo-Irish Treaty, officially called the Articles of Agreement for a Treaty Between Great Britain and Ireland, was a treaty between the Government of the United Kingdom and representatives of the extra-judicial Irish Republic that concluded the Irish War of Independence. ... The Irish Civil War (June 28, 1922 – May 24, 1923) was a conflict between supporters and opponents of the Anglo-Irish Treaty of December 6, 1921, which established the Irish Free State, precursor of todays Republic of Ireland. ... For other persons named Michael Collins, see Michael Collins (disambiguation). ...


Modern Fine Gael describes itself as the party of the "progressive centre"[5], with core values focussed on fiscal rectitude, free enterprise and reward, individual rights and responsibilities.[6] They are strongly pro-EU integration and opposed to violent Irish republicanism. Fine Gael is Ireland's only party in the European People's Party (EPP); its MEPs sit in the EPP-ED group. The party's youth wing, Young Fine Gael, was formed in 1977 and has approximately four thousand members.[7] Irish republicanism is an ideology based on the Irish nationalist belief that all of Ireland should be a single independent republic, whether as a unitary state, a federal state or as a confederal arrangement. ... The European Peoples Party (EPP) is the largest transnational European political party. ... A Member of the European Parliament (English abbreviation MEP)[1] is a member of the European Unions directly-elected legislative body, the European Parliament. ... The European Peoples Party (Christian Democrats) and European Democrats is a group in the European Parliament. ... Young Fine Gael Logo Young Fine Gael (YFG) is the autonomous youth wing of the Irish political party Fine Gael. ...


The current party leader is Enda Kenny. He was elected by a secret ballot of the parliamentary party on 5 June 2002.[8] For the Australian singer of the same name, see Enda Kenny (singer) Enda Kenny (Irish: ; born 24 April 1951), an Irish politician, is the 10th leader of the Fine Gael party and Leader of the Opposition in Dáil Éireann. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...

Contents

History

Main article: History of Fine Gael
General Richard Mulcahy as chief of staff of the National Army
General Richard Mulcahy as chief of staff of the National Army

Following the rise in support for Éamon de Valera's anti-Treaty Fianna Fáil party in the mid-1920s, a new strategy was felt necessary to bolster the pro-Treaty factions which found themselves in opposition. As a result of the Army Comrades Association's defence of Cumann na nGaedhael from republican intimidation Fine Gael was formed through a merger of the ACA, Cumann na nGaedhael and the Centre Party on 3 September 1933.[9] Fine Gael candidates were elected to only thirty-one seats in the 1948 general election, however Fianna Fáil's failure to achieve an overall majority led to the creation of the first Inter-Party Government, made up of an alliance of anti-Fianna Fáil parties, which served between 1948 and 1951. Fine Gael's leader at the time, Richard Mulcahy, was considered too controversial among members of Clann na Poblachta to be Taoiseach due to his role as Chief-of-Staff to the Irish Army in the execution of republicans during the Irish Civil War.[10] Instead, John A. Costello, a compromise candidate, served as head of the government. Costello also headed the second Inter-Party Government which served between 1954 and 1957. Liam Cosgrave, Minister for External Affairs in the coalition negotiated Ireland's entry into the United Nations in 1955.[11] In 1957, de Valera and Fianna Fáil were returned to power and Fine Gael returned to opposition. During its period in opposition, the party's Just Society policy statement came into being. These policies came from an emerging social-democratic wing of the party.[12] In 1966, Fine Gael candidate Tom O'Higgins came within one percent of defeating incumbent Éamon de Valera in the presidential election. As events in Northern Ireland spiralled out of control in the late 1960s, new party leader Liam Cosgrave sought to focus the party's view on its role as protector of the state's institutions, and to neutralise feuding between the party leadership and the centre-left branch of the party. This article chronicles the history of the Fine Gael political party from its inception to the present day. ... Image File history File links General Richard Mulcahy, TD in 1923. ... Image File history File links General Richard Mulcahy, TD in 1923. ... Richard Mulcahy General Richard James Mulcahy (10 May 1886 – 16 December 1971) was an Irish politician, leader of Fine Gael and Cabinet Minister. ... The Irish Army (Irish: Arm na hÉireann) is the main branch of the Irish Defence Forces[1] (Óglaigh na hÉireann). ... Éamon de Valera[1][2] (IPA: ) (Irish: ) (born Edward George de Valera 14 October 1882 – 29 August 1975) was one of the dominant political figures in 20th century Ireland. ... Fianna Fáil – The Republican Party (Irish: ), commonly referred to as Fianna Fáil (IPA ; traditionally translated by the party into English as Soldiers of Destiny, though the actual meaning is Soldiers [Fianna] of Ireland[1]), is currently the largest political party in Ireland with 55,000 members. ... The Army Comrades Association (ACA), better known by its nickname The Blueshirts, was an Irish organisation set up by former police commissioner General Eoin ODuffy in the 1930s. ... Cumann na nGaedhael (IPA: ; Society of the Gaels), sometimes spelt Cumann na nGaedheal,[1] was an Irish language name given to two Irish political parties, the second of which had the greater impact. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Irish general election of 1948 was held on February 4, 1948. ... The 13th Dáil was elected on February 4, 1957 and first met on February 18 when the 5th Government of Ireland was appointed. ... Richard Mulcahy General Richard James Mulcahy (10 May 1886 – 16 December 1971) was an Irish politician, leader of Fine Gael and Cabinet Minister. ... Clann na Poblachta (literally meaning Family of the Republic) was an Irish republican political party founded by former IRA Chief of Staff Sean MacBride in 1946. ... The Taoiseach (IPA: , phonetic: TEE-shock — plural: Taoisigh ( or ), also referred to as An Taoiseach [1], is the head of government or prime minister of the Republic of Ireland . ... The Irish Army (Irish: Arm na hÉireann) is the main branch of the Irish Defence Forces[1] (Óglaigh na hÉireann). ... For the member of Seanad Éireann from 1963–65, see John Costelloe John Aloysius Costello (20 June 1891 – 5 January 1976), a successful barrister, was one of the main legal advisors to the government of the Irish Free State after independence, Attorney General of Ireland from 1926–1932 and Taoiseach... The 15th Dáil was elected on May 18, 1954 and first met on June 2 when the 7th Government of Ireland was appointed. ... Liam Cosgrave (Irish name Liam Mac Cosgair) (born 13 April 1920), served as the fifth Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland between 1973 and 1977. ... UN redirects here. ... Social democracy is a political ideology emerging in the late 19th and early 20th centuries from supporters of Marxism who believed that the transition to a socialist society could be achieved through democratic evolutionary rather than revolutionary means. ... Tom OHiggins (July 23, 1916 - February 25, 2003), was an Irish Fine Gael politician, a barrister, and a judge. ... In the Irish presidential election in 1966 President de Valera reluctantly agreed under Fianna Fáil party pressure to seek a second term. ... This article is about the constituent country. ...


Fine Gael was returned to government in a National Coalition with the Labour Party in 1973. The coalition was beset by problems from the start, including the oil crisis and escalating violence in Northern Ireland.[13] The resignation of President Cearbhall Ó Dálaigh in 1976 after a confrontation with Minister for Defence Paddy Donegan was also a blow to the credibility of the coalition. In 1977, Fianna Fáil under Jack Lynch won an unprecedented twenty-seat majority in the Dáil, and returned to government. Cosgrave resigned the leadership and was replaced by Garret FitzGerald. FitzGerald became Fine Gael's third Taoiseach, again in a short-lived coalition with Labour between 1981 and February 1982. FitzGerald revived Fine Gael's fortunes to the point where they were five seats behind Fianna Fáil following the November 1982 general election. The party returned to government with Labour. FitzGerald negotiated the Anglo-Irish Agreement with British prime minister Margaret Thatcher in 1985. However, the government struggled to control high unemployment and emigration, and was heavily defeated by Fianna Fáil under Charles Haughey in 1987. The Labour Party (Irish: Páirtí an Lucht Oibre) is a Democratic Socialist political party in the Republic of Ireland. ... (Redirected from 1973 energy crisis) United States, drivers of vehicles with odd numbered license plates were allowed to purchase gasoline only on odd-numbered days of the month, while drivers with even-numbers were limited to even-numbered days. ... For other uses, see Troubles (disambiguation) and Trouble. ... Cearbhall Ó Dálaigh (12 February 1911 – 21 March 1978) (pronounced karol o dawl-ie) served as fifth President of Ireland, from 1974 to 1976. ... Paddy Donegan (October 29, 1923 - November 26, 2000) was an Irish Fine Gael politician. ... John (Jack) Mary Lynch (15 August 1917—20 October 1999), was the fourth Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland, serving two terms in office; 1966 to 1973 and 1977 to 1979. ... This article is about the current Irish body. ... Garret FitzGerald (Irish: ; born February 9, 1926) was the seventh Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland, serving two terms in office; July 1981 to February 1982, and December 1982 to March 1987. ... The Irish general election of November 1982 was held on November 24, 1982, three weeks after the dissolution of the Dáil on November 4. ... The Anglo-Irish Agreement was an agreement between the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland which aimed to bring an end to the Troubles in Northern Ireland. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (née Roberts; born 13 October 1925) served as British Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1975 until 1990, being the first and only woman to hold either post. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Charles Haughey Charles James Charlie Haughey (Irish: ; 16 September 1925–13 June 2006) was the sixth Taoiseach of Ireland. ... The Irish general election of 1987 was held on February 17, 1987, four weeks after the dissolution of the Dáil on January 20. ...

John Bruton
John Bruton

FitzGerald was replaced as leader by Alan Dukes, who spearheaded the Tallaght Strategy, under which Fine Gael would not oppose economic measures put forward by the minority Fianna Fáil government in the national interest.[14] The strategy was an electoral disappointment, and the party gained four seats in the 1989 general election. Dukes resigned the leadership after Fine Gael's Austin Currie finished a distant third behind Mary Robinson and Brian Lenihan in the 1990 presidential election.[15] He was replaced by John Bruton. As Fianna Fáil had abandoned its core policy of not going into coalition following the 1989 election, Fine Gael found itself in opposition to a Fianna Fáil-Labour government following the general election in 1992. The government collapsed in 1994, allowing Bruton to become Taoiseach in a Fine Gael-Labour-Democratic Left Rainbow Coalition. The three government parties ran on a united platform in the 1997 election, and Fine Gael gained nine seats. Labour lost heavily however, and Fianna Fáil led by Bertie Ahern came to power in a coalition with the Progressive Democrats.[16] Bruton was replaced as leader in 2001 by Michael Noonan, who led the party into its worst-ever general election in 2002; the party lost twenty-three seats, including those of deputy-leader Jim Mitchell and former leader Alan Dukes.[17] Noonan resigned as leader as the results of the election were being tallied, and was replaced in a subsequent leadership election by Enda Kenny. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Alan Dukes (Irish: ; born April 20, 1945) is an Irish politician, a former leader of the Fine Gael political party and former Teachta Dála (TD) for Kildare South. ... In Irish politics, the Tallaght Strategy was a policy followed by the blueshirts Fine Gael political party starting in 1987. ... The Irish general election of 1989 was held on Friday, June 15, 1989, three weeks after the dissolution of the Dáil on May 25. ... Austin Currie (born 11 October 1939) is a former Irish politician, being elected to the parliaments of both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. ... For the poet, see Mary Robinson (poet). ... This article is about the elder politician. ... In the Irish presidential election in 1990 the Irish Labour Party let it be known that it would for the first time run a candidate. ... John Gerard Bruton (Irish: ; born 18 May 1947) was the ninth Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland. ... Democratic Left is the name of a number of political parties: In Ecuador, Democratic Left led by Guillermo Landazuri. ... The Irish general election of 1997 was held on Friday, June 6, 1997. ... Bartholomew Patrick Bertie Ahern (Irish: Parthalán Pádraig Ó hEachthairn, born 12 September 1951) is an Irish politician who served as Taoiseach of Ireland from 26 June 1997 to 7 May 2008. ... The Progressive Democrats (Irish An Páirtí Daonlathach, lit. ... Michael Noonan (Irish: ; born 21 May 1943) is an Irish politician and was Leader of the Opposition and Leader of Fine Gael from February 2001 to June 2002. ... The Irish general election of 2002 was held on Friday 17 May 2002, just over three weeks after the dissolution of the 28th Dáil on Thursday 25 April by President Mary McAleese, at the request of the Taoiseach, Bertie Ahern. ... For other persons named Jim Mitchell, see Jim Mitchell (disambiguation). ... The 2002 Fine Gael leadership election began in May 2002, when Michael Noonan resigned as party leader due to the partys poor performance in the 2002 general election. ... For the Australian singer of the same name, see Enda Kenny (singer) Enda Kenny (Irish: ; born 24 April 1951), an Irish politician, is the 10th leader of the Fine Gael party and Leader of the Opposition in Dáil Éireann. ...


Following the unveiling of the Mullingar Accord, an election pact agreed after the local and European elections in 2004, Fine Gael and the Labour Party increasingly co-operated in the build-up to the 2007 general election, agreeing a vote-transfer pact and plan to go into government together provided the parties had the required number of seats.[18] The pact was overwhelming endorsed by Labour members at the party's conference in Tralee in May 2005.[19] Fine Gael director of elections Frank Flannery claimed that the agreement, coupled with the party's strong performance in pre-election opinion polls, could lead to a gain of twenty-eight seats in the election.[20] The party gained a total of twenty seats in the election on 24 May 2007, giving the "Alliance for Change" a total of seventy-one seats (seventy six including the Green Party as a potential partner), putting the coalition six seats behind Fianna Fáil. On the first day of the new Dáil, on 14 June 2007, Enda Kenny was nominated for Taoiseach by Fine Gael deputy-leader Richard Bruton and then-Labour leader Pat Rabbitte. He was defeated by incumbent Bertie Ahern and a coalition of Fianna Fáil, the Green Party, the Progressive Democrats and a group of Independents by eighty-nine votes to seventy-six.[21] The Labour Party (Irish: Páirtí an Lucht Oibre) is a Democratic Socialist political party in the Republic of Ireland. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish grid reference Q828141 Statistics Province: Munster County: Elevation: 37 m Population (2006)  - Town:  - Environs:   20,288  2,456 Website: www. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Green Party/Comhaontas Glas was founded as the Ecology Party of Ireland in 1981. ... Fianna Fáil – The Republican Party (Irish: ), commonly referred to as Fianna Fáil (IPA ; traditionally translated by the party into English as Soldiers of Destiny, though the actual meaning is Soldiers [Fianna] of Ireland[1]), is currently the largest political party in Ireland with 55,000 members. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Taoiseach (IPA: , phonetic: TEE-shock — plural: Taoisigh ( or ), also referred to as An Taoiseach [1], is the head of government or prime minister of the Republic of Ireland . ... Richard Bruton (born 1 March 1953) is a Fine Gael politician in Ireland, and has been a Teachta Dála for Dublin North Central since 1982. ... Pat Rabbitte (born May 18, 1949) is a senior Irish politician, who has been the leader of the Labour Party since 2002. ... Bartholomew Patrick Bertie Ahern (Irish: Parthalán Pádraig Ó hEachthairn, born 12 September 1951) is an Irish politician who served as Taoiseach of Ireland from 26 June 1997 to 7 May 2008. ... Fianna Fáil – The Republican Party (Irish: ), commonly referred to as Fianna Fáil (IPA ; traditionally translated by the party into English as Soldiers of Destiny, though the actual meaning is Soldiers [Fianna] of Ireland[1]), is currently the largest political party in Ireland with 55,000 members. ... The Green Party (Irish: ; lit. ... The Progressive Democrats (Irish An Páirtí Daonlathach, lit. ...


Ideology and policies

Michael Collins, founding father of the pro-Treaty movement, that would become Fine Gael.
Michael Collins, founding father of the pro-Treaty movement, that would become Fine Gael.

Although Ireland's political spectrum is divided along Civil War lines, rather than the traditional European left-right spectrum, Fine Gael describes itself as a Christian-democratic party, with a focus on law and order.[6] As the descendent of the pro-Treaty factions in the Irish Civil War, Fine Gael has a strong affinity with Michael Collins. He remains a symbol for the party, and the anniversary of his death is comemorated each year on 22 August.[22] Fine Gael has, since its inception, been a party of fiscal rectitude, advocating pro-enterprise policies. The party is a member of the Centrist Democrat International and sits with the EPP-ED group in the European Parliament. Image File history File linksMetadata Portrait_of_Micheál_Ó_Coileáin. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Portrait_of_Micheál_Ó_Coileáin. ... For other persons named Michael Collins, see Michael Collins (disambiguation). ... The Irish Civil War (June 28, 1922 – May 24, 1923) was a conflict between supporters and opponents of the Anglo-Irish Treaty of December 6, 1921, which established the Irish Free State, precursor of todays Republic of Ireland. ... Political parties Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Left-Right politics or the Left-Right political spectrum is a common way of classifying political positions, political ideologies, or political parties along a one-dimensional political spectrum. ... Christian democracy is a diverse political ideology and movement. ... In politics, law and order refers to a political platform which supports a strict criminal justice system, especially in relation to violent crime and property crimes, through harsher criminal penalties. ... For other persons named Michael Collins, see Michael Collins (disambiguation). ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Christian Democrat International (CDI) was formerly known as the Christian Democrat and Peoples Parties International. ... The European Peoples Party (Christian Democrats) and European Democrats is a group in the European Parliament. ... Established 1952, as the Common Assembly President Hans-Gert Pöttering (EPP) Since 16 January 2007 Vice-Presidents 14 Rodi Kratsa-Tsagaropoulou (EPP) Alejo Vidal-Quadras (EPP) Gérard Onesta (Greens – EFA) Edward McMillan-Scott (ED) Mario Mauro (EPP) Miguel Angel Martínez Martínez (PES) Luigi Cocilovo (ALDE) Mechtild...


Fine Gael is among the most pro-European integration parties in the Republic of Ireland, having supported the failed European Constitution[23] and advocating participation in European common defence.[24] Under Enda Kenny the party has opposed Irish neutrality, with Kenny claiming that "the truth is, Ireland is not neutral. We are merely unaligned."[23] Under Kenny the party has also strongly opposed the perceived "rip-off" society that has developed in Ireland, advocating reform of stealth taxes and stamp duty.[25] The Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe, commonly referred to as the European Constitution, is an international treaty intended to create a constitution for the European Union. ... Stamp duty is a form of tax that is levied on documents. ...


The party is not identified particularly with belonging ideologically to social democracy[26][27][28] or explicitly of the centre-right. Currently, the party identifies generally with European political parties that identify themselves as being Christian-democratic more-so than socially-democratic [29]. Most members in the party are happy with the description of the "the progressive or compassionate centre". Social democracy is a political ideology emerging in the late 19th and early 20th centuries from supporters of Marxism who believed that the transition to a socialist society could be achieved through democratic evolutionary rather than revolutionary means. ... The centre-right is a political term commonly used to describe or denote political parties or organizations (such as think tanks) that stretch from the centre to the right on the left-right spectrum, excluding far right stances. ... Christian democracy is a diverse political ideology and movement. ...


Leadership

Mayo TD Enda Kenny was elected leader of Fine Gael in a secret ballot of the parliamentary party on 5 June 2002. Kenny defeated Richard Bruton, Phil Hogan and Gay Mitchell in the leadership election, which was triggered by the resignation of Michael Noonan following the 2002 general election. The current deputy-leader of the party is Dublin North Central TD and party Finance spokesperson Richard Bruton. He was preceded as deputy leader by Jim Mitchell. The Mayo parliamentary constituency spans the entire area of Mayo County Council in the Connacht county of Mayo. ... A Teachta Dála (Irish for Dáil Deputy, pronounced chock-ta dawla) is a member of Dáil Éireann, the lower chamber of the Irish Oireachtas or National Parliament. ... For the Australian singer of the same name, see Enda Kenny (singer) Enda Kenny (Irish: ; born 24 April 1951), an Irish politician, is the 10th leader of the Fine Gael party and Leader of the Opposition in Dáil Éireann. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Richard Bruton (born 1 March 1953) is a Fine Gael politician in Ireland, and has been a Teachta Dála for Dublin North Central since 1982. ... Phil Hogan is an Irish Fine Gael politician. ... (Gabriel) Gay Mitchell (born December 30, 1951 in Dublin) is an Irish politician and Member of the European Parliament for Dublin since 2004. ... Michael Noonan (Irish: ; born 21 May 1943) is an Irish politician and was Leader of the Opposition and Leader of Fine Gael from February 2001 to June 2002. ... The Irish general election of 2002 was held on Friday 17 May 2002, just over three weeks after the dissolution of the 28th Dáil on Thursday 25 April by President Mary McAleese, at the request of the Taoiseach, Bertie Ahern. ... Dublin North Central is a parliamentary constituency in the Republic of Ireland, located in the capital city, Dublin. ... For other persons named Jim Mitchell, see Jim Mitchell (disambiguation). ...


List of party leaders

Leader Period Constituency
Eoin O'Duffy 1933–34 None[30]
W. T. Cosgrave 1934–44 Carlow-Kilkenny
Richard Mulcahy 1944–59[31][32] Tipperary
James Dillon 1959–65 Monaghan
Liam Cosgrave 1965–77 Dún Laoghaire
Garret FitzGerald 1977–87 Dublin South East
Alan Dukes 1987–90 Kildare South
John Bruton 1990–2001 Meath
Michael Noonan 2001–02 Limerick East
Enda Kenny 2002— Mayo

General Eoin ODuffy (20 October 1892 - 30 November 1944), was in succession a Teachta Dála (TD), the Chief of Staff of the Irish Republican Army, the second Commissioner of the Garda Síochána, leader of the fascist Blueshirts and then the first leader of Fine Gael (1933... ... Carlow-Kilkenny is a constituency represented in Dáil Éireann, the Parliament of the Republic of Ireland. ... Richard Mulcahy General Richard James Mulcahy (10 May 1886 – 16 December 1971) was an Irish politician, leader of Fine Gael and Cabinet Minister. ... This article is about the politician James Dillon. ... County Monaghan Monaghan was a constituency used in elections to Dáil Éireann, the lower house of parliament in the Republic of Ireland. ... Liam Cosgrave (Irish name Liam Mac Cosgair) (born 13 April 1920), served as the fifth Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland between 1973 and 1977. ... The Dún Laoghaire parliamentary constituency is located in the south-western area of Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown in County Dublin, consisting of the area around the town of Dún Laoghaire. ... Garret FitzGerald (Irish: ; born February 9, 1926) was the seventh Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland, serving two terms in office; July 1981 to February 1982, and December 1982 to March 1987. ... Dublin South East is a parliamentary constituency in the Republic of Ireland. ... Alan Dukes (Irish: ; born April 20, 1945) is an Irish politician, a former leader of the Fine Gael political party and former Teachta Dála (TD) for Kildare South. ... Kildare South is a parliamentary constituency in Ireland, which elects three Teachtaí Dála (TDs) to Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Oireachtas (Irish parliament). ... John Gerard Bruton (Irish: ; born 18 May 1947) was the ninth Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland. ... The Meath parliamentary constituency spans the entire area of the county of Meath in Leinster, Ireland, taking in Navan, Trim and Ashbourne. ... Michael Noonan (Irish: ; born 21 May 1943) is an Irish politician and was Leader of the Opposition and Leader of Fine Gael from February 2001 to June 2002. ... Limerick East is a constituency represented in Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Irish parliament or Oireachtas. ... For the Australian singer of the same name, see Enda Kenny (singer) Enda Kenny (Irish: ; born 24 April 1951), an Irish politician, is the 10th leader of the Fine Gael party and Leader of the Opposition in Dáil Éireann. ... The Mayo parliamentary constituency spans the entire area of Mayo County Council in the Connacht county of Mayo. ...

Electoral performance

In the 2007 general election, Fine Gael gained twenty seats bringing them to a total of fifty-one. The party ran candidates in all forty-three constituencies, and had candidates elected in every constituency except Dublin Central, Dublin Mid West, Dublin North West and Kildare South. In local elections held on 11 June 2004, Fine Gael won 293 seats, an increase of sixteen on 1999, bringing the party within nine seats of Fianna Fáil nationally.[33] In European elections held on the same day, the party won five seats, becoming the most represented Irish party in the European Parliament. Fine Gael won fourteen seats in Seanad Éireann following elections in 2007, a loss of one from the previous election in 2002. With the exception of Douglas Hyde (nominated by Fine Gael), a Fine Gael candidate has never been elected to the office of President of Ireland. The most recent Fine Gael presidential candidate, Mary Banotti, finished second in the 1997 election. In 2004, Fine Gael supported the re-election of President Mary McAleese. The Irish general election of 2007 took place on 24 May 2007 after the dissolution of the 29th Dáil by the President on 29 April 2007, at the request of the Taoiseach. ... Dublin Central is a constituency represented in Dáil Éireann, the Parliament of the Republic of Ireland. ... Dublin Mid West is a parliamentary constituency in the Republic of Ireland, located in County Dublin. ... Dublin North-West is a constituency represented in Dáil Éireann, the Parliament of the Republic of Ireland. ... Kildare South is a parliamentary constituency in Ireland, which elects three Teachtaí Dála (TDs) to Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Oireachtas (Irish parliament). ... Local elections were held in all the counties and county boroughs of Ireland on June 11, 2004, on the same day as the European elections. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The European Parliament Election, 2004 was the Republic of Ireland component of the European Parliament Election, 2004. ... Established 1952, as the Common Assembly President Hans-Gert Pöttering (EPP) Since 16 January 2007 Vice-Presidents 14 Rodi Kratsa-Tsagaropoulou (EPP) Alejo Vidal-Quadras (EPP) Gérard Onesta (Greens – EFA) Edward McMillan-Scott (ED) Mario Mauro (EPP) Miguel Angel Martínez Martínez (PES) Luigi Cocilovo (ALDE) Mechtild... This is a list of the members of the 23rd Seanad Éireann, the upper house of the Oireachtas (legislature) of Ireland. ... Douglas Hyde (Irish name Dubhghlas de hÍde) (17 January 1860 - 12 July 1949) was an Irish language scholar who served as the first President of Ireland from 1938 to 1945. ... The President of Ireland (Irish: ) is the head of state of Ireland. ... Mary Banotti (born 1939), was an Irish politician. ... The Irish general election of 1997 was held on October 30, 1997. ... Mary Patricia McAleese (Irish: [1]; born 27 June 1951) is the eighth, and current President of Ireland. ...


General election results

Year Dáil No. of seats % of vote
1937 9th 48 34.8
1938 10th 45 33.3
1943 11th 32 23.1
1944 12th 30 21.8
1948 13th 31 19.8
1951 14th 40 25.7
1943 15th 50 32.0
1957 16th 40 26.6
1961 17th 47 32.0
1965 18th 47 33.9
1969 19th 50 33.3
1973 20th 54 35.1
1977 21st 43 30.6
1981 22nd 65 39.2
1982 (Feb) 23rd 63 37.3
1982 (Nov) 24th 70 39.2
1987 25th 50 27.1
1989 26th 55 29.3
1992 27th 45 24.5
1997 28th 54 27.9
2002 29th 31 22.5
2007 30th 51 27.3

See also: Government of the 9th Dáil Categories: Elections in Ireland | 1937 ... This is a list of the 138 members who were elected to the 9th Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Oireachtas (legislature) of the Irish Free State. ... See also: Government of the 10th Dáil Categories: Elections in Ireland | 1938 ... This is a list of the 138 members who were elected to the 10th Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Oireachtas (legislature) of Ireland. ... See also: Government of the 11th Dáil Categories: Elections in Ireland | 1943 ... This is a list of the 138 members who were elected to the 11th Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Oireachtas (legislature) of Ireland. ... The Irish general election of 1944 was held on May 30, 1944, three weeks after the dissolution of the Dáil on May 9. ... This is a list of the 138 members who were elected to the 12th Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Oireachtas (legislature) of Ireland. ... The Irish general election of 1948 was held on February 4, 1948. ... This is a list of the 147 members who were elected to the 13th Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Oireachtas (legislature) of Ireland. ... The Irish general election of 1951 was held on May 30, 1951. ... This is a list of the 147 members who were elected to the 14th Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Oireachtas (legislature) of the Republic of Ireland. ... See also: Government of the 15th Dáil Categories: Elections in Ireland | 1954 ... This is a list of the 147 members who were elected to the 15th Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Oireachtas (legislature) of the Republic of Ireland. ... The Irish general election of 1957 was held on March 5, 1957, just over three weeks after the dissolution of the Dáil on February 4. ... This is a list of the 147 members who were elected to the 16th Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Oireachtas (legislature) of the Republic of Ireland. ... The Irish general election of 1961 was held on October 4, 1961, just over three weeks after the dissolution of the Dáil on September 8. ... This is a list of the 144 members who were elected to the 17th Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Oireachtas (legislature) of the Republic of Ireland. ... First time TDs David Andrews Michael OLeary See also Government of the 18th Dáil Categories: Elections in Ireland | 1965 ... This is a list of the 144 members who were elected to the 18th Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Oireachtas (legislature) of the Republic of Ireland. ... Jack Lynch becomes Taoiseach after winning his first election as leader of Fianna Fáil The Irish general election of 1969 was held on June 18, 1969, just over four years after its predecessor. ... This is a list of the 144 members who were elected to the 19th Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Oireachtas (legislature) of the Republic of Ireland. ... The Irish general election of 1973 was held on February 28, 1973. ... This is a list of the 144 members who were elected to the 20th Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Oireachtas (legislature) of the Republic of Ireland. ... The Irish general election of 1977 was held on June 16, 1977. ... This is a list of the 144 members who were elected to the 21st Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Oireachtas (legislature) of the Republic of Ireland. ... The Irish general election of 1981 was held on June 11, 1981, three weeks after the dissolution of the Dáil on May 21. ... This is a list of the members who were elected to the 22nd Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Oireachtas (legislature) of the Republic of Ireland. ... The Irish general election of February 1982 was held on February 18, 1982, three weeks after the dissolution of the Dáil on January 27. ... This is a list of the members who were elected to the 23rd Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Oireachtas (legislature) of the Republic of Ireland. ... The Irish general election of November 1982 was held on November 24, 1982, three weeks after the dissolution of the Dáil on November 4. ... This is a list of the members who were elected to the 24th Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Oireachtas (legislature) of the Republic of Ireland. ... The Irish general election of 1987 was held on February 17, 1987, four weeks after the dissolution of the Dáil on January 20. ... This is a list of the members who were elected to the 25th Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Oireachtas (legislature) of the Republic of Ireland. ... The Irish general election of 1989 was held on Friday, June 15, 1989, three weeks after the dissolution of the Dáil on May 25. ... This is a list of the members who were elected to the 26th Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Oireachtas (legislature) of the Republic of Ireland. ... The Irish general election of 1992 was held on Wednesday, November 25, 1992, almost three weeks after the dissolution of the Dáil on November 5. ... This is a list of the members who were elected to the 27th Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Oireachtas (legislature) of the Republic of Ireland. ... The Irish general election of 1997 was held on Friday, June 6, 1997. ... This is a list of the members who were elected to the 28th Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Oireachtas (legislature) of the Republic of Ireland. ... The Irish general election of 2002 was held on Friday 17 May 2002, just over three weeks after the dissolution of the 28th Dáil on Thursday 25 April by President Mary McAleese, at the request of the Taoiseach, Bertie Ahern. ... This is a list of the members who were elected to the 29th Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Oireachtas (legislature) of the Republic of Ireland. ... The Irish general election of 2007 took place on 24 May 2007 after the dissolution of the 29th Dáil by the President on 29 April 2007, at the request of the Taoiseach. ... This is a list of the members who will be elected to the 30th Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Oireachtas (legislature) of the Republic of Ireland. ...

Front bench

Portfolio Spokesperson
Leader of the Opposition
Northern Ireland
Enda Kenny 2002—
Deputy-Leader of the Opposition
Finance
Richard Bruton 2002—
Justice & Law Reform Charles Flanagan 2007—
Foreign Affairs Billy Timmins 2007—
Enterprise, Trade & Employment Leo Varadkar 2007—
Health & Children Dr. James Reilly 2007—
Environment, Heritage & Local Government Phil Hogan 2007—
Arts, Sport & Tourism Olivia Mitchell 2007—
Social, Family Affairs & Equality Olwyn Enright 2007—
Transport & the Marine Fergus O'Dowd 2007—
Community, Rural & Gaeltacht Affairs Michael Ring 2007—
Agriculture & Food Michael Creed 2007—
Education & Science Brian Hayes 2007—
Defence Jimmy Deenihan 2007—
Immigration and Integration Denis Naughten 2007—
Children Alan Shatter 2007—
Communications & Natural Resources Simon Coveney 2007—
Chief Whip Paul Kehoe 2007—

The Leader of the Opposition (Ir Ceannaire an Fhreasúra) in the Republic of Ireland is the politician who, at least in theory, leads the Parliamentary Opposition bloc in the lower house of the Irish Parliament, Dáil Éireann. ... This article is about the constituent country. ... For the Australian singer of the same name, see Enda Kenny (singer) Enda Kenny (Irish: ; born 24 April 1951), an Irish politician, is the 10th leader of the Fine Gael party and Leader of the Opposition in Dáil Éireann. ... The Opposition Spokesperson on Finance in the Republic of Irelands parliamentary system is the member of the official Opposition Front Bench who is primarily responsible for marking the Minister for Finance. ... Richard Bruton (born 1 March 1953) is a Fine Gael politician in Ireland, and has been a Teachta Dála for Dublin North Central since 1982. ... The Minister for Justice, Equality and Law Reform is the senior minister at the Department of Justice, Equality and Law Reform in the Irish Government. ... Charles Flanagan (born November 1956 is a former Irish Fine Gael politician. ... The Minister for Foreign Affairs is the senior minister at the Department of Foreign Affairs (An Roinn Gnóthaí Eachtracha) in the Irish Government. ... Billy Timmins is an Irish Fine Gael politician. ... The Minister for Enterprise, Trade and Employment is the senior minister at the Department of Enterprise, Trade and Employment (An Roinn Fiontar, Trádála agus Fostaíochta) in the Irish Government. ... Leo Varadkar is an Irish Fine Gael politician. ... The Minister for Health and Children is the senior minister at the Department of Health and Children (An Roinn Sláinte agus Leanaí) in the Irish Government and is responsible for health care in the Republic of Ireland and related services. ... Dr. James Reilly is an Irish Fine Gael politician and medical doctor. ... The Minister for the Environment, Heritage and Local Government (Irish: ) is the senior minister at the Department of the Environment, Heritage and Local Government in the Government of Ireland. ... Phil Hogan is an Irish Fine Gael politician. ... The Minister for Arts, Sport and Tourism is the senior minister at the Department of Arts, Sport and Tourism (An Roinn Ealaíon Spóirt agus Turasóireachta) in the Irish Government. ... Olivia Mitchell (born July 31, 1947) is an Irish Fine Gael politician. ... The Minister for Social and Family Affairs is the senior minister at the Department of Social and Family Affairs (An Roinn Gnothaí Sóisialacha agus Teaghlaigh) in the Irish Government. ... Olwyn Enright (born July 1, 1974) is an Irish Fine Gael politician. ... The Minister for Transport and the Marine (Irish: ) is the senior minister at the Department of Transport and the Marine in the Irish Government. ... Fergus ODowd is an Irish Fine Gael politician. ... The Minister for Community, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs is the senior minister at the Department of Community, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs (An Roinn Gnóthaí Pobail, Tuaithe agus Gaeltachta) in the Irish Government. ... Popular if at times outspoken Fine Gael TD for Mayo. ... The Minister for Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (Irish: ) is the senior minister at the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food in the Irish Government. ... Michael Creed (born June 1963) is a former Irish Fine Gael politician. ... The Minister for Education and Science is the senior minister at the Department of Education and Science (An Roinn Oideachais agus Eolaíochta) in the Irish Government. ... Brian Hayes (born August 23, 1969) is an Irish Fine Gael politician. ... The Minister for Defence is the senior minister at the Department of Defence (An Roinn Cosanta) in the Irish Government. ... Jimmy Deenihan (born September 1952) is an Irish Fine Gael politician. ... Denis Naughten is an Irish Fine Gael politician. ... Alan Joseph Shatter is an Irish politician and member of the Fine Gael political party. ... The Minister for Communications, Energy and Natural Resources (Irish: ) is the senior minister at the Department of Communications, Energy and Natural Resources in the Irish Government. ... Simon Coveney is an Irish politician and Member of the European Parliament for Ireland South. ... The Chief Whip is a political office in some legislatures assigned to an elected member whose task is to administer the whipping system that ensures that members of the party attend and vote as the party leadership desires. ... Paul Kehoe is an Irish Fine Gael politician. ...

Young Fine Gael

Young Fine Gael or YFG is the youth movement of Fine Gael. It was founded in 1976 by the then leader Dr. Garret Fitzgerald. It caters for young people under 30 with an interest in Fine Gael and politics, in cities, towns, parishes and third level colleges throughout Ireland. YFG claims the largest membership of Irish youth political parties, with 4000 members.[7] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Young Fine Gael Logo Young Fine Gael (YFG) is the autonomous youth wing of the Irish political party Fine Gael. ... Young Fine Gael Logo Young Fine Gael (YFG) is the autonomous youth wing of the Irish political party Fine Gael. ...



YFG is lead by its national executive consisting of eleven members elected on a regional basis, and on a national panel. Barry Walsh is its current president.


In the coming period it has been suggested by members of its national executive, that it will also be extending associate membership to interested parties, particularly Irish students living outside of the state, primarily in Northern Ireland and the UK mainland.


YFG has run campaigns on European referenda, social issues, health care and housing. It was involved in campaigning for a 'yes' vote to the Lisbon Reform Treaty Referendum.


See also

There are a number of political parties in the Republic of Ireland, and coalition governments are common. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ Often anglicised to IPA: /ˌfɪnə ˈgeɪl/; approximate English translation: Family or Tribe of the Irish.
  2. ^ Fine Gael. Join Fine Gael. Retrieved on 31 October 2007.
  3. ^ Gerard O'Connell History of Fine Gael. Retrieved on 31 October 2007.
  4. ^ The Irish Times. Legacy of the Easter Rising. Retrieved on 31 October 2007.
  5. ^ Party Leader
  6. ^ a b Fine Gael. The party largely conforms to the idea of Christian democracy. See Our Values. Retrieved on 31 October 2007.
  7. ^ a b RTÉ News. Election 2007 - Youth parties. Retrieved on 31 October 2007.
  8. ^ RTÉ News (5 June 2002). Enda Kenny elected Fine Gael leader. Retrieved on 31 October 2007.
  9. ^ Gerard O'Connell. Eoin O'Duffy. Retrieved on 31 October 2007.
  10. ^ University College Dublin Archives. Richard Mulcahy. Retrieved on 2 November 2007.
  11. ^ Dermot Ahern (18 November 2005). The Fiftieth Anniversary of Ireland’s Membership of the United Nations—Looking Forward. Royal Irish Academy. Retrieved on 31 October 2007.
  12. ^ David Begg (28 February 2004). The Just Society. Irish Congress of Trade Unions. Retrieved on 31 October 2007.
  13. ^ Peter Barberis, John McHugh, Mike Tyldsley. Encyclopedia of British and Irish Political Organizations, p.739. Published by Continuum International Publishing Group. ISBN 0826458149.
  14. ^ The Economist (22 June 2006). Charles Haughey: obituary. Retrieved on 31 October 2007.
  15. ^ Bernard A. Cook (New York, London, 2001). Europe Since 1945: An Encyclopedia. Published by Taylor & Francis. ISBN 0815340575.
  16. ^ RTÉ Libraries and Archives. 1997 general election. Retrieved on 31 October 2007.
  17. ^ RTÉ Libraries and Archives. 2002 general election. Retrieved on 31 October 2007.
  18. ^ RTÉ News (6 September 2004). Opposition leaders unveil 'Mullingar Accord'. Retrieved on 1 November 2007.
  19. ^ RTÉ News (28 May 2005). Rabbitte addresses Labour conference. Retrieved on 1 November 2007.
  20. ^ RTÉ News (14 September 2006). Fine Gael repeats seat gain claim. Retrieved on 1 November 2007.
  21. ^ RTÉ News (14 June 2007). Ahern names new Cabinet. Retrieved on 1 November 2007.
  22. ^ The Hogan Stand (21 September 2005). Michael Collins' view of life in Achill Gaeltacht. Retrieved on 31 October 2007.
  23. ^ a b National Forum on Europe (26 October 2006). Enda Kenny calls for Unified EU Approach to Immigration. Retrieved on 31 October 2007.
  24. ^ National Forum on Europe (3 April 2003). Should we back a pledge to defend others if they come under attack?. Retrieved on 31 October 2007.
  25. ^ Fine Gael. 2007 General Election Manifesto. Retrieved on 31 October 2007.
  26. ^ Fine Gael - MSN Encarta
  27. ^ http://books.google.it/books?id=qps14mSlghcC&pg=PA218&lpg=PA218&dq=fine+gael+social-democratic&source=web&ots=2i4HL3BFX8&sig=8FtrQ61vfx3mghWuJ2EJoJUtKC4&hl=it
  28. ^ What Fine Gael needs to do is find its bottom - National News, Frontpage - Independent.ie
  29. ^ Fine Gael’s European Strategy « EAST WEST EUROPE | Ireland and the Wider Europe, 2008
  30. ^ O'Duffy did not hold a seat in the Oireachtas while he was party leader.
  31. ^ While Mulcahy was a member of the Seanad in 1944, Tom O'Higgins acted as parliamentary party leader.
  32. ^ Between 1948 and 1959, John A. Costello served as parliamentary leader.
  33. ^ ElectionsIreland.org. Local Elections 2004. Retrieved on 31 October 2007.

The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... It has been suggested that Irish Times Trust be merged into this article or section. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Christian democracy is a diverse political ideology and movement. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... RTÉ News and Current Affairs is a major division of Radio Telefís Éireann responsible for news programming on television, radio and online within the Republic of Ireland. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... RTÉ News and Current Affairs is a major division of Radio Telefís Éireann responsible for news programming on television, radio and online within the Republic of Ireland. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... University College Dublin - National University of Ireland, Dublin - more commonly University College Dublin (UCD) - is Irelands largest university, with over 20,000 students. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Dermot Ahern (born 2 February 1955) is a senior Irish Fianna Fáil politician who currently serves as the Minister for Foreign Affairs. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Irish Congress of Trade Unions (ICTU), formed in 1959 by the merger of the Irish Trade Union Congress (founded in 1894) and the Congress of Irish Unions (founded in 1945), is the organisation to which trade unions in both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland affiliate. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Economist is an English-language weekly news and international affairs publication owned by The Economist Newspaper Ltd and edited in London. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... This article is about the state. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Radio Telefís Éireann (RTÉ; Irish for Radio and Television of Ireland) is the national publicly-funded broadcaster of Ireland. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Radio Telefís Éireann (RTÉ; Irish for Radio and Television of Ireland) is the national publicly-funded broadcaster of Ireland. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... RTÉ News and Current Affairs is a major division of Radio Telefís Éireann responsible for news programming on television, radio and online within the Republic of Ireland. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... RTÉ News and Current Affairs is a major division of Radio Telefís Éireann responsible for news programming on television, radio and online within the Republic of Ireland. ... is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... RTÉ News and Current Affairs is a major division of Radio Telefís Éireann responsible for news programming on television, radio and online within the Republic of Ireland. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... RTÉ News and Current Affairs is a major division of Radio Telefís Éireann responsible for news programming on television, radio and online within the Republic of Ireland. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Type Upper house of Oireachtas Cathaoirleach Pat Moylan, Fianna Fáil since 13 September 2007 Members 60 Political groups Fianna Fáil Fine Gael Labour Party Independents Progressive Democrats Green Party Sinn Féin Last elections 2007 Meeting place Leinster House Web site www. ... Tom OHiggins (July 23, 1916 - February 25, 2003), was an Irish Fine Gael politician, a barrister, and a judge. ... For the member of Seanad Éireann from 1963–65, see John Costelloe John Aloysius Costello (20 June 1891 – 5 January 1976), a successful barrister, was one of the main legal advisors to the government of the Irish Free State after independence, Attorney General of Ireland from 1926–1932 and Taoiseach... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...

Bibliography

  • Nealon's Guide to the 29th Dáil and Seanad (Gill and Macmillan, 2002) (ISBN 0-7171-3288-9)
  • Stephen Collins, "The Cosgrave Legacy" (Blackwater, 1996) (ISBN 0-86121-658-X)
  • Garret FitzGerald, "Garret FitzGerald: An Autobiography" (Gill and Macmillan, 1991) (ISBN 0-7171-1600-X)
  • Jack Jones, In Your Opinion: Political and Social Trends in Ireland through the Eyes of the Electorate (Townhouse, 2001) (ISBN 1-86059-149-3)
  • Maurice Manning, James Dillon: A Biography (Wolfhound, 1999/2000) (ISBN 0-86327-823-X)
  • Stephen O'Byrnes, Hiding Behind a Face: Fine Gael under FitzGerald (Gill and Macmillan: 1986) (ISBN 0-7171-1448-1)
  • Raymond Smith, Garret: The Enigma (Aherlow, 1985) (no ISBN)

External links

  • Official website
  • Young Fine Gael
Northern Ireland is a constituency of the European Parliament. ... Political parties Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      This is an overview of political parties by country, in the form of a table with a link to a list of political parties in each country and showing which party system is dominant in each country . ... Politics of Ireland (the Republic of Ireland) takes place in a framework of a parliamentary representative democratic republic, whereby the Taoiseach (Prime Minister) is the head of government, and of a pluriform multi-party system. ...

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Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Fine Gael (1129 words)
Fine Gael (pronounced fee-na gale) is currently the main opposition party in the Republic of Ireland.
Fine Gael's revitalisation was of such a scale that by the December 1982 general election, Fine Gael was only five seats behind Fianna Fáil in Dáil Éireann and bigger than the party in Oireachtas Éireann (both houses of parliament put together).
Fine Gael generally follows centre-right policies and is allied with Christian Democrat[?] parties in the European Union.
RTÉ News: Fine Gael publishes election manifesto (445 words)
Fine Gael has launched its election manifesto in Dublin, promising a new 30% tax rate for moderate wage earners.
Fine Gael leader Michael Noonan said that he was offering voters a vision of a forward-looking Ireland, and promised to plan the future with care.
He said it was not possible for Fine Gael to do what they promise within a sensible budgetary framework, without setting the country back.
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