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Encyclopedia > Financial risk management
Corporate finance

Working capital management
Cash conversion cycle
Return on capital
Economic value added
Just In Time (business)
Economic order quantity
Discounts and allowances
Factoring (finance)
Domestic credit to private sector in 2005 Corporate finance is an area of finance dealing with the financial decisions corporations make and the tools and analysis used to make these decisions. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1031x740, 688 KB)Midtown Manhattan looking North from the Empire State Building, 2005. ... Corporate finance is a specific area of finance dealing with the financial decisions corporations make and the tools as well as analysis used to make these decisions. ... Cash conversion cycle or CCC, also known as the asset conversion cycle, net operating cycle, working capital cycle or just cash cycle, is used in the financial analysis of a business. ... Return on capital, also known as Return On Invested Capital (ROIC) is defined as NOPLAT / Invested Capital usually expressed as a percentage. ... Economic Value Added (EVA) is an estimate of true economic profit after making corrective adjustments to GAAP accounting, including deducting the opportunity cost of equity capital. ... Just In Time (JIT) is an inventory strategy implemented to improve the return on investment of a business by reducing in-process inventory and its associated costs. ... Economic Order Quantity (also known as the Wilson EOQ Model or simply the EOQ Model) is a model that defines the optimal quantity to order that minimizes total variable costs required to order and hold inventory. ... Discounts and allowances are modifications to the basic price. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Capital budgeting
Capital investment decisions
The investment decision
The financing decision
Capital investment decisions
The process of determining which potential long-term projects are worth undertaking, by comparing their expected discounted cash flows with their internal rates of return. ... Domestic credit to private sector in 2005 Corporate finance is an area of finance dealing with the financial decisions corporations make and the tools and analysis used to make these decisions. ... Domestic credit to private sector in 2005 Corporate finance is an area of finance dealing with the financial decisions corporations make and the tools and analysis used to make these decisions. ... Domestic credit to private sector in 2005 Corporate finance is an area of finance dealing with the financial decisions corporations make and the tools and analysis used to make these decisions. ... Domestic credit to private sector in 2005 Corporate finance is an area of finance dealing with the financial decisions corporations make and the tools and analysis used to make these decisions. ...

Sections
Managerial finance
Financial accounting
Management accounting
Mergers and acquisitions
Balance sheet analysis
Business plan
Corporate action
Managerial Finance is that branch of finance that provide tools for a companys financial managers. ... The field of accounting that serves external decision makers, such as stockholders, suppliers, banks and government agencies See also: Management accounting field of accounting concerned with external users of a companys financial information. ... Management accounting is concerned with the provisions and use of accounting information to managers within organizations, to provide them with the basis in making informed business decisions that would allow them to be better equipped in their management and control functions. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... A business plan is a formal statement of a largely enforced business goal, the reasons why they are believed attainable, and the plan for reaching those goals (Fiifi Essel). ... A corporate action is an event taken by a public company that has a direct financial impact on of its shareholders. ...


Finance series
Financial market
Financial market participants
Corporate finance
Personal finance
Public finance
Banks and Banking
Financial regulation
This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In economics a financial market is a mechanism that allows people to easily buy and sell (trade) financial securities (such as stocks and bonds), commodities (such as precious metals or agricultural goods), and other fungible items of value at low transaction costs and at prices that reflect efficient markets. ... There are two basic financial market participant catagories, Investor vs. ... Domestic credit to private sector in 2005 Corporate finance is an area of finance dealing with the financial decisions corporations make and the tools and analysis used to make these decisions. ... Personal finance is the application of the principles of finance to the monetary decisions of an individual or family unit. ... Public finance (government finance) is the field of economics that deals with budgeting the revenues and expenditures of a public sector entity, usually government. ... “Banker” redirects here. ... Financial supervision is government supervision of financial institutions by regulators. ...

v d

Financial risk management is the practice of creating economic value in a firm by using financial instruments to manage exposure to risk, particularly credit and market risk. Similar to general risk management, financial risk management requires identifying the sources of risk, measuring risk, and plans to address them. As a specialization of risk management, financial risk management focuses on when and how to hedge using financial instruments to manage costly exposures to risk. Wall Street, Manhattan is the location of the New York Stock Exchange and is often used as a symbol for the world of business. ... Financial instruments package financial capital in readily tradeable forms - they do not exist outside the context of the financial markets. ... Lets talk about risk control strategies, anyone with more information and willing to share, please do so. ... Credit risk is the risk of loss due to a debtors non-payment of a loan or other line of credit (either the principal or interest (coupon) or both). ... Market risk is the risk that the value of an investment will decrease due to moves in market factors. ... For non-business risks, see risk or the disambiguation page risk analysis. ... For non-business risks, see risk or the disambiguation page risk analysis. ... Lets talk about risk control strategies, anyone with more information and willing to share, please do so. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Hedge (finance). ...


In the banking sector worldwide, Basel Accord are generally adopted by internationally active banks to tracking, reporting and exposing operational, credit and market risks. The Basel Accord(s) refers to the banking supervision Accords (recommendations to laws), Basel I and Basel II issued by the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision. ...


When to use financial risk management

Finance theory (i.e., financial economics) prescribes that a firm should take on a project when it increases shareholder value. Finance theory also shows that firm managers cannot create value for shareholders, also called its investors, by taking on project that shareholders could do for themselves at the same cost. When applied to financial risk management, this implies that firm managers should not hedge risks that investors can hedge for themselves at the same cost. This notion is captured by the hedging irrelevance proposition: In a perfect market, the firm cannot create value by hedging a risk when the price of bearing that risk within the firm is the same as the price of bearing it outside of the firm. In practice, financial markets are not likely to be perfect markets. This suggests that firm managers likely have many opportunities to create value for shareholders using financial risk management. The trick is to determine which risks are cheaper for the firm to manage than the shareholders. A general rule of thumb, however, is that market risks that result in unique risks for the firm are the best candidates for financial risk management. Financial economics is the branch of economics concerned with resource allocation over time. ... A shareholder or stockholder is an individual or company (including a corporation) that legally owns one or more shares of stock in a joint stock company. ... It has been suggested that Management system be merged into this article or section. ... Invest redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Lets talk about risk control strategies, anyone with more information and willing to share, please do so. ... In economics and business, the price is the assigned numerical monetary value of a good, service or asset. ... Market risk is the risk that the value of an investment will decrease due to moves in market factors. ...


References

  • Crockford, Neil (1986). An Introduction to Risk Management (2nd ed.). Woodhead-Faulkner. 0-85941-332-2. 
  • Lam, James (2003). Enterprise Risk Management: From Incentives to Controls. John Wiley. ISBN-13 978-0471430001. 
  • van Deventer, Donald R., Kenji Imai and Mark Mesler (2004). Advanced Financial Risk Management: Tools and Techniques for Integrated Credit Risk and Interest Rate Risk Management. John Wiley. ISBN-13: 978-0470821268. 

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Financial Risk Management (FRM) (3983 words)
Risk management, as it is understood today, largely emerged during the early 1990s, but the term “risk management” was used long before this.
The new “risk management” that evolved during the 1990s is different from either of the earlier forms.
With regard to the market risk faced by derivatives dealers, the report recommends that portfolios be marked-to-market daily, and that market risk be assessed with both value-at-risk and stress testing.
Financial risk management - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (319 words)
Financial risk management is the practice of creating value in a firm by using financial instruments to manage exposure to risk.
financial economics) prescribes that a firm should take on a project when it increases shareholder value.
A general rule of thumb, however, is that market risks that result in unique risks for the firm are the best candidates for financial risk management.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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