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Encyclopedia > Final Fight
Final Fight
Final Fight arcade flyer - European release
Developer Capcom
Publisher Capcom, U.S. Gold Ltd., Ubisoft
Designer Planners: Pon G, Akiman, Nin
Released Arcade
JPN December 1989
NA January 1990
EUR 1990
Super NES
JPN December 21, 1990

NA November 10, 1991
EUR December 10, 1992
Commodore 64
NA January 1990
EUR 1991
Amstrad CPC
EUR 1991
ZX Spectrum
EUR 1991
Amiga
EUR 1991
Atari ST
EUR 1991
Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (850x1189, 273 KB) Promotional flyer for the arcade version of Final Fight. ... A video game developer is a software developer (a business or an individual) that creates video games. ... For the original NASA meaning, see capsule communicator. ... For the original NASA meaning, see capsule communicator. ... Ubisoft Entertainment (formerly Ubi Soft) is a computer and video game publisher and developer with headquarters in Montreuil-sous-Bois, France. ... A game designer is a person who designs games. ... Akira Yasuda ) (born July 21, 1964) is a Japanese illustrator, animator, character designer, game designer and mecha designer, who works under the pen name, akiman. ... Centipede by Atari is a typical example of a 1980s era arcade game. ... This article is about the country in East Asia. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... The European SNES design is identical to the Super Famicom. ... This article is about the country in East Asia. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... C-64 redirects here. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... The Amstrad CPC was a series of 8-bit home computers produced by Amstrad during the 1980s and early 1990s. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... The ZX Spectrum is an 8-bit personal home computer released in the United Kingdom in 1982 by Sinclair Research Ltd. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the family of home computers. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... The Atari ST is a home/personal computer that was commercially popular from 1985 to the early 1990s. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...

X68000
JPN 1992
Sega CD
JPN March 26, 1993
NA 1993
EUR 1993
Game Boy Advance
NA September 26, 2001
Virtual Console
JPN April 17, 2007
NA May 7, 2007
EUR April 27, 2007
Genre Beat 'em up
Mode(s) Single player, 2 player Co-op
Platform(s) Arcade, Amiga, Amstrad CPC, Atari ST, Commodore 64, GBA, PlayStation 2, Sega CD, ZX Spectrum, Super NES, Sharp X68000, Xbox, Game Boy Advance, PlayStation Portable, Virtual Console
Input methods 8-way Joystick, 3 Buttons
Arcade cabinet Upright
Arcade system CPS-1
Arcade display Raster, 384 x 224 pixels (Horizontal), 4096 colors

Final Fight (ファイナルファイト Fainaru faito?) is a beat 'em up series from Capcom. It is considered to be Street Fighter's "cousin", and the two series are set in the same universe (characters like Guy, Andore (under the name 'Hugo'), Rolento, Cody, Sodom, and Poison have all appeared in later Street Fighter installments). Final Fight was originally released as an arcade game and was ported to several platforms, including the Super NES, Sega CD, Sharp X68000 and Game Boy Advance. It features former wrestler (as seen in Saturday Night Slam Masters), and mayor of Metro City (Capcom's fictitious city, modeled after New York City), Mike Haggar. The Sharp X68000, often referred to as the X68k, was a home computer released only in Japan. ... This article is about the country in East Asia. ... The Sega Mega-CD (Japanese: メガCD) is an add-on device for the Sega Mega Drive released in Europe, Australia, and Japan. ... This article is about the country in East Asia. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... “GBA” redirects here. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about Nintendos emulation feature and download service. ... This article is about the country in East Asia. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Video games are categorized into genres based on their gameplay. ... Beat Em Up is the Iggy Pop album on which the band were first labeled as The Trolls: Iggy Pop, Whitey Kirst, Pete Marshall, Alex Kirst, Lloyd Mooseman Roberts. ... In computer games and video games, single-player refers to the variant of a particular game where input from only one player is expected throughout the course of the gaming session. ... Doom popularised co-op on the PC. Cooperative gameplay (often abbreviated as co-op) primarily refers to a feature in video games that allows players to work together as teammates with the absence of player-controlled competitors. ... In computing, a platform describes some sort of framework, either in hardware or software, which allows software to run. ... Centipede by Atari is a typical example of a 1980s era arcade game. ... This article is about the family of home computers. ... The Amstrad CPC was a series of 8-bit home computers produced by Amstrad during the 1980s and early 1990s. ... The Atari ST is a home/personal computer that was commercially popular from 1985 to the early 1990s. ... C-64 redirects here. ... “GBA” redirects here. ... PS2 redirects here. ... The Sega Mega-CD ) is an add-on device for the Sega Mega Drive released in Europe, Australia, New Zealand and Japan. ... The ZX Spectrum is an 8-bit personal home computer released in the United Kingdom in 1982 by Sinclair Research Ltd. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ... The Sharp X68000, often referred to as the X68k, was a home computer released only in Japan by the Sharp Corporation. ... The Xbox is a sixth generation era video game console produced by Microsoft Corporation. ... “GBA” redirects here. ... The PlayStation Portable , officially abbreviated as PSP) is a handheld game console released and currently manufactured by Sony Computer Entertainment. ... This article is about Nintendos emulation feature and download service. ... For other uses, see Joystick (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Button (computing). ... This arcade cabinet, containing Centipede, is an upright. ... An arcade system board is a standardized printed circuit board or group of printed circuit boards that are used as the basis for multiple arcade games with very similar hardware requirements. ... The CPS-1 ) or Capcom Play System 1 is an arcade system board by Capcom that debuted in 1988 with Forgotten Worlds and Ghouls n Ghosts. ... A computer display monitor, usually called simply a monitor, is a piece of electrical equipment which displays viewable images generated by a computer without producing a permanent record. ... Imagine the smiley face in the top left corner as an RGB bitmap image. ... Beat Em Up is the Iggy Pop album on which the band were first labeled as The Trolls: Iggy Pop, Whitey Kirst, Pete Marshall, Alex Kirst, Lloyd Mooseman Roberts. ... For the original NASA meaning, see capsule communicator. ... “Street Fighter” redirects here. ... Centipede by Atari is a typical example of a 1980s era arcade game. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ... The Sega Mega-CD ) is an add-on device for the Sega Mega Drive released in Europe, Australia, New Zealand and Japan. ... The Sharp X68000, often referred to as the X68k, was a home computer released only in Japan by the Sharp Corporation. ... “GBA” redirects here. ... Saturday Night Slam Masters (Muscle Bomber: The Body Explosion in Japan) is a series of pro wrestling games by Capcom. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Mike Haggar is a video game character from both the Saturday Night Slam Masters and Final Fight series. ...


The early design name for Final Fight was Street Fighter '89, before Street Fighter II was planned. The artwork for the promotional poster under this name is the same as the European flyer shown to the right. Street Fighter II ) is a 1991 competitive fighting game by Capcom. ...

Contents

Gameplay

Final Fight featured very large and detailed sprites for its day, and the controls were quite fluid and simple. The game also began the strength-based, speed-based, and average character variety that countless other beat 'em up and other genres derived, as one controls Haggar (very powerful yet very slow and vulnerable to attack), Guy (very agile and can use hit-and-run, yet has weak offensive power), or Cody (who balances strength and speed, being an excellent choice for beginners). It also featured very long levels and various powerful enemies that could easily crowd the screen and had several fighting tactics against the player. In computer graphics, a sprite (also known by other names; see Synonyms below) is a two-dimensional/three-dimensional image or animation that is integrated into a larger scene. ... Mike Haggar is a video game character from both the Saturday Night Slam Masters and Final Fight series. ... Guy , also written as 凱) is a video game character from both the Final Fight and Street Fighter series. ... Cody Travers is a video game character from both the Final Fight and Street Fighter series. ...


Story

The story of Final Fight involves the abduction of Mayor Mike Haggar's daughter, Jessica, because he would not work with Mad Gear to ensure their dominance of the streets. When the Mad Gear thug Damnd contacts Haggar and informs him, Haggar calls up his daughter's boyfriend Cody and his sparring partner Guy (later on stated by Capcom that they never met until then and the dialogue was added for the U.S audience, Guy being Bushin is sworn to fight evil), and the three vigilantes head into the streets to bust Mad Gear's skulls, fighting their way through the hordes of goons littering the city (including the Rastafarian thug Damnd, the "Japanophile" Sodom, former Red Beret and militia leader Rolento, corrupt cop Edi. E, and the ill-tempered Abigail), to get to Mad Gear's boss, Belger. On the top floor of a large building, Cody knocks Belger out of the window, sending him falling to his death. “Kidnapper” redirects here. ... Rasta hairstyle Rastafarianism is a religious movement that believes in the divinity of ex Ethiopian emperor Haile Selassie. ... Lafcadio Hearn, aka Koizumi Yakumo, a notable scholar and author well known for his strong interest in Japanese culture and books on Japan. ... Sodom (a. ... Lebanese Kataeb militia A Militia is an army composed of ordinary [1] citizens to provide defense, emergency or paramilitary service, or those engaged in such activity. ... Rolento F. Schugerg, more commonly known as Rolento (or Rolent) is a video game character from both the Final Fight and Street Fighter series. ... Belger is a video game character from the Final Fight series. ...


The original Japanese version of the Final Fight intro states that the game takes place in 1989 and provides the corresponding ages and birthdates for each of the main characters. The English language version of the arcade game's intro is a bit vague, stating only that the game takes place "Sometime in the 1990s..." and only provides the birthdates for the characters. The new English translation featured in Final Fight One reverts back to the original 1989 date. Since the backstory of the Street Fighter Alpha games established that the events of Final Fight occurred during the same time as the first Street Fighter tournament set in 1987, some feel that in order for the shared fictional universe to work, the events of Final Fight must be pushed back to that specific date. This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Street Fighter ) is a 1987 arcade game developed by Capcom. ...


Playable Characters

Cody Travers

Cody wields a knife against an Axl enemy in Stage 1
Cody wields a knife against an Axl enemy in Stage 1
Further information: Cody (Final Fight)
  • Birthdate: 4/18/1967
  • Profile: He is a martial arts expert. He is especially good with knives. His girlfriend, Jessica was kidnapped by the Mad Gear Gang.
  • Advantage: Balanced power and speed.
  • Sure-Kill Technique: Hurricane Kick.
  • Weapon of Preference: The Knife.
  • Special Ability: Cody can stab with knives at melee range, which Guy and Haggar cannot do. From a distance, Cody will hurl knives.
  • Additional Ability: Cody is the only character that is able to punch at arrows fired from Belger; they then will fall to the ground.

Image File history File links Final_Fight_Cody. ... Image File history File links Final_Fight_Cody. ... Cody Travers ) is a video game character from both the Final Fight and Street Fighter series. ...

Guy

Further information: Guy (Final Fight)
  • Birthdate: 8/12/1965
  • Profile: He has mastered the art of Ninjutsu and attacks with unequaled speed. He often catches his opponents off guard with his special "Off-the-wall" jump.
  • Advantage: Unmatched speed.
  • Sure-Kill Technique: Bushin Roundhouse Kick.
  • Weapon of Preference: The Katana Blade. There are two variations: Masamune and Muramasa.
  • Special Ability: Off-the-wall jump. Guy can use walls or vertical planes to launch himself towards opponents with a kick that has longer reach and high priority damage. This move can also be altered into using the down attack (elbow) to get more points and set the player up to either knee or throw the opponents.

Guy , also written as 凱) is a video game character from both the Final Fight and Street Fighter series. ...

Mike Haggar

Further information: Mike Haggar
  • Birthdate: 9/3/1943
  • Profile: He is a former champion Street Fighter. He's the new mayor of Metro City. He has mastered professional wrestling skills and is an expert at the Backdrop and the Piledriver.
  • Advantage: Unmatched power.
  • Sure-Kill Technique: Spinning Clothesline.
  • Weapon of Preference: The lead pipe.
  • Special Ability: Haggar exploits his wrestling skills to throw enemies with fervent ease.
    • Backdrop: Haggar performs a German Suplex that slams his opponent from behind.
    • Piledriver: Haggar grabs an opponent, leaps several feet into the air and smashes him down on the ground for massive damage.

Mike Haggar is a video game character from both the Saturday Night Slam Masters and Final Fight series. ...

Enemies

As with most games in the genre, Final Fight features a variety of enemy characters the player must defeat in order to progress through the game. Although there are numerous small fry characters thorough the game, only seven of them are actually unique in terms of appearances and fighting style, while the rest are head swap/palette swap counterparts with more or less vitality. There's also six unique boss characters, one for each stage. Head swapping is the act of removing the head from an animated character and replacing it with a different one. ... A red Koopa Troopa from Super Mario Bros. ...


Underlings

  • Bred, along with Dug, Simons and Jake, serve as the game's standard thug characters. They are dressed in matching pants and tank tops (with jackets for Simons and Jake), with Bred dressed in gray, Dug in red-orange, Simons in gold, and Jake in blue. They have no distinguishing characteristic or attack other than their ability to push oildrums. Bred appears in the game's first bonus round after the player trashes his car. In the GBA version of the first bonus round, Dug appears instead of Bred. Only Jake and Simons, the most powerful of the four, can perform a flying kick.
  • J and Two. P - A pair of punks dressed in baggy pants and jackets. J is dressed in yellow and blue and has an atomic biohazard symbol on his back, while Two. P wears orange and green and has a dragon symbol on his back. They tend to strike when the player has their back turn on one of them.
  • Axl and Slash - A pair of bikers named after Axl Rose and Slash respectively of Guns N' Roses. They are the only enemy characters that block the player's attacks. They loosely resemble their real life counterparts, with Axl having blond shoulder-length hair and red bandanna, while Slash has black curly hair. Axl wears a grey uniform, and Slash wears brown.
  • Holly Wood and El Gado - A pair of knife-wielding fighters dressed in camouflage garb and ski caps. Their fighting style is described in one of the Japanese manuals as being based on dancing. Their most powerful attack is the jumping knife strike. Holly Wood wears orange, and El Gado wears yellow. There are versions of Holly Wood dressed in red that often shows up to throw Molotov cocktails at the player.
  • Bill Bull, G. Oriber and Wong Who - A group of obese men. Their most powerful attack is the charging headbutt. Bill Bull wears grey pants, G. Oriber wears blue pants, and Wong Who wears green pants.
  • Poison and Roxy - Two scantily clad bad girls. They wear matching black shorts, white tank tops and hats, with Poison having pink hair and Roxy having orange hair. They attack with an acrobatic fighting style. Because of the U.S. laws of video game morality at the time, they were replaced by two male counterparts named Billy and Sid respectively in the English localization of the SNES and GBA versions. Poison is one of the most prominent character in the series and would reappear as a playable character in Final Fight Revenge, as well as Hugo's manager in the Street Fighter III games.
  • Andore (pronounced An-Do-Ray as in André) - A pro-wrestling thug modeled after André the Giant. He wears a shocking pink-colored leopard-print outfit and attacks with pro wrestling techniques, including a charge attack, a pile drive and choke attack. He has numerous palette counterparts in the game, with Andore Jr. (who's dressed in red) appearing alongside him in nearly every instance. Grandfather (in blue), Uncle (in dark grey), and Father (in yellow) appear as sub-bosses in Round 3.

Biological hazard. ... W. Axl Rose[1][2] (born William Bruce Rose, Jr. ... Saul Hudson (born July 23, 1965), more widely known as Slash, is an English/American guitarist best known as the former lead guitarist of Guns N Roses and as the current lead guitarist of Velvet Revolver. ... Guns N Roses is an American hard rock band, formed in Los Angeles, California in 1985. ... The top combatant can attack with headbutts while being held in the bottom combatants guard. ... Poison is a video game character from the Final Fight series, created by Akiman for Capcom. ... Final Fight Revenge is a 3D fighting game in the Final Fight series. ... Hugo is a character from Capcoms Street Fighter III fighting game series. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... André René Roussimoff (May 19, 1946 – January 27, 1993), best known as André the Giant, was a French professional wrestler and actor. ... This article is about the color. ...

Bosses

Damnd - The boss of the Slum area (Round 1). A Caribbean thug who serves as Mad Gear's informant, though he is apparently also an informant for the FBI and a worshiper of Mammon[1]. He is the one who calls Haggar in the opening intro and can be seen carrying Jessica at the start of the game. When he takes a certain amount of damage, he summons his underlings to fight in his stead by whistling, while he sits in wait before waiting for the opportunity to strike the player. His name was changed to Thrasher in the English localizations of the early console versions. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...



Sodom - The boss of the Subway area (Round 2). A Japanophile who speaks in broken Japanese. He is dressed in samurai-like protective gear (including a blue kabuto helmet that conceals his face) and is armed with twin Masamune blades. The player can disarm him and use his blades against him, but he will counteract this with a rush attack. His name was changed to Katana in early English localizations of the console versions as well as the SNES version of Street Fighter Alpha 2. Sodom would reappear as a playable character in the Street Fighter Alpha series. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Sodom (a. ... Lafcadio Hearn, aka Koizumi Yakumo, a notable scholar and author well known for his strong interest in Japanese culture and books on Japan. ... For other uses, see Samurai (disambiguation). ... Ornate kabuto from the Glenbow Museum collection Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Kabuto Kabuto (兜, 冑) is a large helmet used with traditional Japanese armour as worn by samurai. ... Masamune Portrait This article is about the swordsmith. ... The Street Fighter Alpha (in Japan and other parts of Asia, Street Fighter Zero) series of fighting games is part of the Street Fighter series developed by Capcom. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...



Edi E. - A corrupt police officer who serves as the boss of the West Side area (Round 3). He attacks the player with his nightstick and when he's low on health, he will draw his revolver and start shooting randomly. The gum he spits out just before starting to fight will restore a little health if needed. Makes a cameo appearance in a couple of Cody's win poses in Street Fighter Alpha 3. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...



Rolento - A former member of the Red Beret special forces who is in charge of Mad Gear's drug plant. The boss of the Industrial Area (Round 4). He attacks the player with his club and grappling techniques. When he is low on health, he will resort to "shadow dashing" around the arena and throwing many grenades. Stage 4 and Rolento are absent from the SNES version. Like Sodom, Rolento would be turned into a playable character in the Street Fighter Alpha series, starting with Alpha 2. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Rolento F. Schugerg )[1], more commonly referred by his first name, is a video game character from both the Final Fight and Street Fighter series. ...



Abigail - The boss of the Bayside area (Round 5). He is a head swap of Andore who wears a white outfit and has a face paint and mohawk (like the wrestler Animal). He tends to literally turn red when angry and charges towards the player with a punch. When he's low on health, the charge attacks become more frequent. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Road warrior. ...



Belger - The final boss and leader of Mad Gear. He poses as a disabled old man on a wheelchair in order to trick his enemies and attacks the player with his crossbow. When he first appears, he is holding Jessica on his lap. When the player defeats him, he is thrown into his window and falls from the high rise building and into the ground. In the English localization of the SNES version, his wheelchair was redrawn into an office chair. The dialogue portrait in Final Fight One shows Belger with a full beard, however his sprite shows that he only has his usual neck beard. He reappears as a cyborg in Mighty Final Fight and as a zombie Final Fight Revenge. His brother, Father Bella, serves as the antagonist of Final Fight Streetwise. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article or section on a video game-related subject may need to be cleaned up and rewritten because it describes a work of fiction in a primarily in-universe style. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section contains a plot summary that may be overly long, confusing, or ambiguous. ...

Ports

Capcom has produced various home versions of the original Final Fight throughout the years, with each version offering different changes and additions to the game. The following is a brief summary of each version and the characteristics that make them unique.


SNES version

The SNES version of Final Fight was first released on December 21, 1990 in Japan and in September 1991 in North America. Both releases served as launch titles for their respective regions. The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ...


Several aspects of the game were changed from the arcade version, due in part to the limitations of cartridge space at the time. The most notable differences were:

  • The game only offered single-player play.
  • Guy was removed, leaving only two characters playable.
  • Graphical changes to conform to Nintendo of America's policies regarding drug use, nudity and transgenderism.
  • The fourth stage from the original version, the "Industrial Area," and its boss, Rolento, were removed.

Other differences include a reduced number of on-screen enemies and objects (due to hardware limitations), the omission of transition scenes (including the opening of Stage 1, where Jessica is carried away by Damnd) and the fact that the player must restart the entire stage after continuing from a Game Over, rather than being taken right to the spot where he died. Nintendo Corporation, Limited (Japanese: 任天堂; Ninten is translated roughly as leave luck to heaven or in heavens hands, do is a common suffix for names of shops or laboratories; TSE: NTDOY) was originally founded in 1889 by Fusajiro Yamauchi to produce handmade hanafuda cards, for use in...


This version was released to the Virtual Console in 2007, with no changes. This article is about Nintendos emulation feature and download service. ...


Final Fight Guy

A second SNES version of the game, titled Final Fight Guy, was released on March 20, 1992 in Japan. This version remained a Japanese-only release for a while until June 1994, in which Capcom released it in North America as a rental-only release. As the title implies, Capcom addressed one of the more common complaints of the first version by bringing back Guy as a playable character. However, they did so by removing Cody from the game. The game's opening and ending sequences are changed accordingly to reflect this change, with the explanation given stating that Cody is away on a training mission. However, the other flaws of the first version were left unaddressed in this version. The missing stage music from the Industrial Area can be heard in the Option Menu, suggesting than an attempt to restore the missing stage was at least made. is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ...


This version also fixes some of the flicker effects whenever there are too many enemies and barrels on-screen. There are also two new power-ups added to this version: A Jessica doll, which makes the player's character invulnerable to damage for a short time, and a doll of the player's character, which serves as an extra life. The enemy placement is also significantly different from the original (especially on the "Expert" setting) and the background of Stage 3 (the "West Side") has the bar crowd that was missing in the original port. Flicker is visible fading between image frames displayed on cathode ray tube (CRT) based monitor. ... 1-up (or 1UP, 1-UP, etc. ... Singles bar redirects here. ...


Note: This was released later in Australia as "Final Fight" on the Super Nintendo, only adding to the confusion.


Mighty Final Fight

Main article: Mighty Final Fight

Mighty Final Fight is a beat em up released by Capcom for the Nintendo Entertainment System in 1993. ...

Final Fight CD

The Sega CD version, titled Final Fight CD, was developed internally by Sega under license from Capcom and released in 1992. The game was considerably better received by arcade fans over the previous SNES version due to the inclusion of most of the missing elements from the arcade game, such as a playable Guy, the industrial stage with the Rolento boss fight, and simultaneous two-player mode. Due to the use of the CD-ROM medium, the developers saw fit to add extended opening and ending sequences, featuring full voice acting. An arranged Red Book soundtrack was also composed for this version, and a time attack mode featuring new stages for each character was added. The Sega Mega-CD ) is an add-on device for the Sega Mega Drive released in Europe, Australia, New Zealand and Japan. ... This article is about the video game company. ... The CD-ROM (an abbreviation for Compact Disc Read-Only Memory (ROM)) is a non-volatile optical data storage medium using the same physical format as audio compact discs, readable by a computer with a CD-ROM drive. ... A voice actor (also a voice artist) is a person who provides voices for animated characters (including those in feature films, television series, animated shorts), voice-overs in radio and television commercials, audio dramas, dubbed foreign language films, video games, puppet shows, and amusement rides. ... In popular music an arrangement is a setting of a piece of music, which may have been composed by the arranger or by someone else. ... Red Book is the standard for audio CDs (Compact Disc Digital Audio system, or CDDA). ...


Final Fight One

A Game Boy Advance version, titled Final Fight One, was released in 2001. This version was based on the previous SNES versions (particularly Final Fight Guy), but contained all three playable characters and co-op gameplay through cable linking. The missing Industrial Area stage was restored as well, with the second Bonus Round moved after the fifth stage (the Bay Area). The Guy/Haggar and Jessica doll power-ups were kept, with a Cody doll added to the mix. Most of the scene transitions were added to this version, though a few are still missing such as boarding the train in mission 2 (the doors of the train also do not open as they do in the arcade) and entering the lift in the final mission. “GBA” redirects here. ...


A feature unique to this version, is the added dialogue between the main characters and the enemies prior to boss fights. Sodom and Rolento are shown in their win pose from Street Fighter Alpha 3 when introduced. The game also allows the player to play as the Alpha versions of Cody and Guy after defeating a determined amount of enemies with the regular version of the characters.


As of now, this one is considered the most definitive version of the game.


Capcom Classics Collection

Final Fight was included as a component in this compilation released in 2005 for the PlayStation 2 and Xbox. Unlike most of the other games in the compilation (and previous versions of Final Fight), this version of Final Fight is a direct emulation of the arcade original based on the U.S. version. The compilation also features unlockable tips, music, character profiles and artwork from Final Fight (among other games). The PlayStation Portable version was bundled in the Capcom Classics Collection Remixed released in 2006 and it is a direct Japan arcade port with unlockable elements (the port of the arcade Final Fight is also available on GameTap). Capcom Classics Collection is a compilation of arcade games that was released by Capcom for the PlayStation 2 and Xbox on September 27, 2005. ... PS2 redirects here. ... The Xbox is a sixth generation era video game console produced by Microsoft Corporation. ... The PlayStation Portable , officially abbreviated as PSP) is a handheld game console released and currently manufactured by Sony Computer Entertainment. ... GameTap is a subscription-based video game service by Turner Broadcasting System (TBS). ...


Final Fight: Streetwise

Final Fight is an unlockable feature when finishing the main game of Streetwise. This version of Final Fight is emulated differently from the Capcom Classics Collection version: the framerate is lower, leading to somewhat slower gameplay. Also the audio is somewhat fuzzy. The video quality is also blurred and blocky. Capcom Classics Collection is a compilation of arcade games that was released by Capcom for the PlayStation 2 and Xbox on September 27, 2005. ...


Capcom Production Studio 8 did not have enough development time to access the code from Capcom Japan to create a perfect emulation.


Other versions

Final Fight was ported by Capcom to the Sharp Sharp X68000 computer in Japan. This version was considered an accurate port of the arcade game, with the only notable difference being a reduction of the number of on-screen enemies. The X68000 was capable of near arcade quality graphics and sound (more so than the Sega CD version), and included a simultaneous 2 player mode, which was not available in the SNES version. European-based U.S. Gold also released ports of Final Fight for the Amiga, Atari ST, Commodore 64, Sinclair Spectrum and Amstrad CPC. The Amiga version was considered to be one of the worst arcade to computer conversions ever made. The game suffered from slowdown, having only a one-button joystick for control and was panned for what seemed to be no effort on the programmers part to make the game play anything like the original. The graphics and sound were generally quite faithful though, the background and sprites are well drawn, although somewhat less colourfull renditions of the original and the sound effects were ripped from the arcade ROMs although some FX from the arcade were discovered on the 2 disk set but are never heard in the game. No in game music and basic attack patterns suggest either an early alpha version of the game was hurried into the shops or simply the programmer never played the original, but this is pure speculation. The intro music was taken from an Amiga shareware music disk featuring various artists. The programmers notes can be read in the file s:startup-sequence on the floppy disk. Sharp Corporation ) (TYO: 6753 , LuxSE: SRP) is a Japanese electronics manufacturer, founded in 1912. ... The Sharp X68000, often referred to as the X68k, was a home computer released only in Japan by the Sharp Corporation. ... This article is about a video game company. ... This article is about the family of home computers. ... The Atari ST is a home/personal computer that was commercially popular from 1985 to the early 1990s. ... C-64 redirects here. ... The ZX Spectrum is an 8-bit personal home computer released in the United Kingdom in 1982 by Sinclair Research Ltd. ... The Amstrad CPC was a series of 8-bit home computers produced by Amstrad during the 1980s and early 1990s. ...


In the Amiga version Andore makes an appearance on the first stage.


Final Fight was also ported to mobile phones and published by Breakpoint in the UK.


Censorship

In addition to the differences between the arcade and home versions of the game, the U.S. home console version of Final Fight was censored when they were localized to the American market with the later released European versions being identical. It should be noted that censorship does not remove from or change anything in Capcom canon. The original Japanese arcade version of Final Fight is the canon version, as is the Japanese versions of its sequels Final Fight 2 and 3. The following is a list of specific changes made to each version.


Arcade version

Jessica in the Japanese arcade version

In the original arcade version of Final Fight released in Japan, during the game's opening intro, Jessica is shown wearing only her bra when Haggar turns the TV monitor. The shot was removed from the North American and Worldwide versions of the game. Instead, the scene cuts directly to Damnd while Jessica can be heard screaming in the background. Image File history File links Jessica_Haggar. ... Image File history File links Jessica_Haggar. ...


In the Sega CD and SNES ports of the game (as well in Final Fight Guy and Final Fight One), this scene was redrawn so that Jessica appears to be wearing her red cocktail dress instead. Some of the other home versions featured Jessica with her bra, depending on the regional release.


Sega CD version

The arcade version, on the left, originally exposed half of Poison's breasts. The Sega CD version, on the right, lengthened Poison's tank top and shorts.

The Sega CD version kept Poison and Roxy unchanged in the North American and European releases, with the only graphical alteration made being the length of their shorts and tank tops (which originally exposed half of their breasts). However, some of the other aspects of the game were censored as well similarly to the SNES version, including the names of the first two bosses. The Japanese Sega CD release featured Jessica in her underwear in the opening intro (like in the Japanese arcade version), while the English version features her in her red dress. Final FIght 2 File links The following pages link to this file: Gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender characters in video and computer games ... Final Fight 2 - Sega CD File links The following pages link to this file: Gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender characters in video and computer games ...

Poison's replacement, Billy, from Final Fight (GBA version).
Poison's replacement, Billy, from Final Fight (GBA version).

Image File history File links Ff_billy. ... Image File history File links Ff_billy. ... “GBA” redirects here. ...

SNES and GBA versions

For the English-language editions of the SNES games, as well as the SEGA CD port, Sodom (the boss of the second stage) was renamed Katana because of fears that the name would be associated with sodomy. The name of Sodom is intact in Final Fight One. However, some fans feel Katana is a more appropriate name for an American who wants to be Japanese. The first stage boss, Damnd, was also renamed to Thrasher. The quote at the end of the first bonus stage Break Car was changed from "Oh, my God!" to "Oh, my car!" for the SNES and GBA versions. When you hit someone with a normal attack in any version, you get a small explosion effect. However, in the Japanese version, when you hit an enemy with a weapon, you will see a little blood squirt, like in the arcade game. This was dropped from other versions, and instead you just have the explosion effect again. In the West Side level, the sign outside the door is different depending on the version. The Japanese version has "BAR", whilst other versions have "CLUB". The statues you can often see in the Up Town level are also different. In the Japanese version, the breasts are more exposed, whilst in all other versions they have been covered up significantly. The health power-ups changed, Beer became Rootbeer and whisky became vitamine. Belger's wheelchair is completely different in all versions but aside from the Japanese one. The Japanese version has Belger's chair looking like the one in the arcade version. However, in the US and PAL version the chair was changed. François Elluin, Sodomites provoking the wrath of God, from Le pot pourri de Loth (1781). ...


The localized SNES ports also had the two "female" enemies in the game, Roxy and Poison, replaced by male versions named Sid and Billy. This was because the developers stated that the character was a transsexual in the backstory, but the U.S. branch of Capcom was not aware of the character's true gender when they originally released the arcade version. According to the book Game Over by David Sheff, when a Capcom USA playtester reviewed the contents of the game and objected to the presence of female gang members in the game, one of the designers explained that "there are no female enemies" in the game and that Poison and Roxy were transsexuals. Actually, they were originally females, but this was changed due to the stated objections of Capcom U.S.A. The developers changed their gender, but they did not change the in-game sprites. In Japan, the two characters have always been considered as full-females. In the character descriptions featured in the Super Famicom version's manual, both characters are referred as transsexuals, with Poison being the original and Roxy as a male admirer of Poison who fashioned himself after him. When these character descriptions were translated in Capcom Classics Collection, Poison was clearly identified as a male, whereas Roxy became female (most likely a translation error, if not deliberate change). A transsexual (sometimes transexual) person establishes a permanent identity with the opposite gender to their assigned (usually at birth) sex. ... Capcom Classics Collection is a compilation of arcade games that was released by Capcom for the PlayStation 2 and Xbox on September 27, 2005. ...


Roxy and Poison were also replaced in Final Fight One (despite the fact that Damnd and Sodom kept their original names in the English version), although Poison still made an appearance in the game's manual. Despite this, Poison's counterpart (Poison Kiss) in Mighty Final Fight was featured in the North American version of the game. This was presumably due to the more cartoonish nature of the game compared to realistic look of the original game.


The opening dialogue was also adjusted for these releases; when Haggar asks Damnd "what happened to Jessica", Damnd's line was changed from "Nothing, but we'd enjoy the opportunity" to "Nothing yet.. but we will if..." Also when Haggar turns on his TV, his "You son of a..." is changed to "You fiend!"


Pop culture

There are several tributes in the game to pop culture. Former Capcom Studio 8 lead designer Tom Sakine stated Final Fight was inspired by the 1984 film Streets of Fire. The film's plot shares some key similarities to Final Fight's plot. The main character played by Michael Paré is named 'Tom Cody' and Cody resembles him. Tom Cody also wears jeans and a white shirt at some points during the movie. The movie is set in a rundown city that is plagued by gangs and a motorcycle gang kidnaps Cody’s ex-girlfriend. Also, the cop that arranges a meeting between Cody and the Gang’s boss is a cop by the named 'Ed Price', the only Cop in the game is called 'Edi E.'. The gang's boss, Raven Shaddock, wears an odd-cut pair of black overalls which have a similar design to the character Bred. Finally, at the end of the movie, Cody leaves the girl, just like in the game. Only this time, there is no 'Guy' to stop him from leaving. Popular culture, sometimes abbreviated to pop culture, consists of widespread cultural elements in any given society. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Michael Paré (born October 9, 1958 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American actor. ...


There are other influences on Final Fight from other sources of pop culture. Andore was a tribute to professional wrestler André the Giant. Despite their similarities, Andore and Hugo (from Street Fighter III) have never been clearly referred to as being the same person. Guy was based on Guy Picciotto of the American punk band Fugazi. Axl and Slash, were named after band members in Guns N' Roses. Poison got her name from the American glam rock group of the same name. Sodom got his name from a German thrash band. Abigail is a homage to King Diamond, as his name taken from one of his albums and Abigail's facepaint design is reference to him as well. Billy and Sid, Poison and Roxy's console replacements, were named after Billy Idol and Sid Vicious, respectively. André René Roussimoff (May 19, 1946 – January 27, 1993), best known as André the Giant, was a French professional wrestler and actor. ... Guy Picciotto (born September 17, 1965) is an American musician from Washington, DC. He is most widely known for his roles as the guitarist and vocalist for the groups Fugazi, and Rites of Spring. ... Fugazi redirects here. ... Guns N Roses is an American hard rock band, formed in Los Angeles, California in 1985. ... Poison is an American glam metal band which originally achieved popular success in the late 1980s and early 1990s. ... Glam rock (also known as glitter rock), is a style of rock and pop music, which initially surfaced in the post-hippie early 1970s. ... Sodom is a German thrash metal band formed in 1982. ... King Diamond (born Kim Bendix Petersen, June 14, 1956, Copenhagen, Denmark) is a heavy metal musician known for his shock rock image. ... Billy Idol (born William Michael Albert Broad) is an British musician and singer. ... For the professional wrestler, see Sid Eudy. ...


The grindcore band FDISK was influenced by the game as fans and wrote a song, "Metro City, Crime Capital of the World" which features actual clips of gameplay sound effects in the game. This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ...


Relationship to other games

The game was originally going to be the sequel of the original Street Fighter. The working title for the game was Street Fighter '89. The game was announced in Japanese magazines with the name Street Fighter: The Final Fight in March 1989. During the opening to the original version of Street Fighter II, Joe, a character from the original Street Fighter that physically resembles Cody can be seen punching Mike, another Street Fighter character. Neither character appears in Street Fighter II, but in Street Fighter Alpha 3, Cody inherits Joe's fighting moves. For other uses, see Sequel (disambiguation). ... Street Fighter ) is a 1987 arcade game developed by Capcom. ... A working title is the temporary name of a product or project used during its development. ... A video game magazine is a magazine that talks about video games on PC, other computers or video game consoles. ...


Guy, Cody, Sodom, and Rolento are featured in the Street Fighter Alpha series. Rolento does not appear until Street Fighter Alpha 2 and Cody does not appear until Alpha 3.


The Mad Gear Gang is named after the Capcom driving/shoot-em-up game Mad Gear. [1].


Final Crash was a bootleg of Final Fight released in the arcades in 1990 by Playmark. [2] It is the same game, only with a modified title screen. Some machines perform a "Test Sound" when they are turned on or reset, all voices and sound effects are played there.


Cody, Guy, Maki, Sodom, Rolento, and Hugo (a character evidently the same as the enemy Andore) also starred in various Street Fighter games, while Haggar has also appeared in the Slam Masters series. Hugo, Maki, and Rolento also appeared in the SNK vs. series. Mike Haggar and Guy both appear in Namco x Capcom, with the latter partnered with Ninja Commando Ginzu (Shou in Japan) from Captain Commando. The SNK vs. ... Namco x Capcom (ナムコ クロス カプコン) is a turn-based strategy game featuring characters from games produced by video game companies Namco and Capcom, and developed by Monolith Soft. ... Captain Commando is an arcade game produced by Capcom in 1991, featuring the character of the same name. ...


Mike Haggar was a playable character in Saturday Night Slam Masters featuring all of his moves from Final Fight and adding new moves like a body slam. Saturday Night Slam Masters (Muscle Bomber: The Body Explosion in Japan) is a series of pro wrestling games by Capcom. ...


Continue screens

Final Fight (and both of its sequels) featured a notorious continue screen in the vein of the arcade version of Ninja Gaiden. In Final Fight, once the player has lost all his lives, the screen changes to the character tied to a chair with a bundle of dynamite ready to explode in his face. If the player does not insert a coin within the ten second countdown, the bomb will detonate, causing the screen to flash black and white. In Final Fight 2, the character is locked in a well with water slowly rising towards his head. Final Fight 3 pays tribute to Ninja Gaiden's continue screen by lowering a giant spike press on top of the character, who is tied down in the same way Ryu Hayabusa was in the arcade version. Unlike Ninja Gaiden, instead of a scream being heard at the end of the countdown, a sound effect was heard. (An explosion, a splash, etc.) A continue screen for Marvel vs. ... Ninja Gaiden ) is an arcade game released in 1988 in North America by Tecmo. ... Dynamite is an explosive based on the explosive potential of nitroglycerin, initially using diatomaceous earth (kieselguhr) as an adsorbent. ... Final Fight 2 is a 1993 beat em up for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System and the second game in Capcoms Final Fight series. ... Final Fight 3, known in Japan as Final Fight Tough ), is the third game in the Final Fight series. ... Ryu Hayabusa ) is a video game character who stars in the Ninja Gaiden series of video games and appears in the Dead or Alive fighting game series, all developed by Team Ninja, a part of publisher Tecmo. ...


References

SNK vs. ...

External links

  • Final Fight at the Killer List of Videogames
  • Final Fight at GameFAQs
  • Final Fight Online
  • Hardcore Gaming 101 - Final Fight
  • Final Fight at MobyGames
  • Final Fight at World of Spectrum
  • Final Fight guide at StrategyWiki
  • Final Fight at PCBdB*
  • Final Fight at ArcadeHistory
  • Final Fight art at FightingStreet.com


Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Killer List of Videogames (otherwise known simply as KLOV, pronounced Kay-El-Oh-Vee) is a website devoted to cataloging arcade games past and present. ... GameFAQs is a website that hosts FAQs and walkthroughs for video games. ... MobyGames is a website devoted to cataloging computer and video games, both past and present. ... World of Spectrum is a website devoted to cataloging and archiving material for the ZX Spectrum home computer pupular in the 1980s. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
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Final Fight is one of those games many Nintendo loyalists may be torn on.
Final Fight is a solid title, but it has its sacrifices as well.
If you’re aching for a brawler on VC though, Final Fight is still your best bet, so either drop the cash and enjoy, or hold those points and wait for the inevitable sequels to follow.
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