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Encyclopedia > Final Fantasy VII
Final Fantasy VII

North American box art
Developer(s) Square
Publisher(s) PlayStation
JP Square
NA SCE America
PAL SCE Europe
INT Square
Windows
Eidos Interactive
Designer(s) Hironobu Sakaguchi (producer, original scenario concept)
Yoshinori Kitase (director, scenario writer)
Tetsuya Nomura (character designer, original scenario concept)
Kazushige Nojima (scenario writer, event planner)
Yoshitaka Amano (image illustrator, title logo designer)
Nobuo Uematsu (composer)
Series Final Fantasy
Platform(s) PlayStation, Windows
Release date PlayStation
JP January 31, 1997
NA September 7, 1997
EU November 17, 1997 [1]
INT October 2, 1997
Windows
NA June 24, 1998
EU 1998
AUS 1998
Genre(s) Console role-playing game
Mode(s) Single-player
Rating(s) ELSPA: 11+
ESRB: T (Teen) (13+)
OFLC: G8+
PEGI: 12+
USK: 12+
Media PlayStation
3 CD-ROMs
Windows
4 CD-ROMs
System requirements Windows (PC)
166 MHz Pentium CPU, 32 MB RAM, 4X CD-ROM drive, DirectX 5.1 compatible sound and video card, 260 MB available hard disk space, Windows 95 or above (officially not compatible with 2000 or XP)[2]
Input methods PlayStation
PlayStation controller
Windows
Keyboard or joystick

Final Fantasy VII (ファイナルファンタジーVII Fainaru Fantajī Sebun?) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square, and the seventh installment in the Final Fantasy series. It was released in 1997 and is the first numbered Final Fantasy game for Sony's PlayStation and Microsoft's Windows-based personal computers. It is the first installment to use 3D computer graphics,[3] featuring fully rendered characters on pre-rendered backgrounds.[4][5][6] Image File history File links Mergefrom. ... Gaia is the fictional world in the 1997 console role-playing game Final Fantasy VII. The games setting follows in the footsteps of Final Fantasy VI by presenting a world with considerably more advanced technology than the first five games in the series. ... Final Fantasy VII (US version) box art This is the cover art for a video game. ... A video game developer is a software developer (a business or an individual) that creates video games. ... Square Company, Limited ) was a Japanese video game company founded in September of 1983 by Masafumi Miyamoto and Hironobu Sakaguchi. ... This article is about the country in East Asia. ... Square Company, Limited ) was a Japanese video game company founded in September of 1983 by Masafumi Miyamoto and Hironobu Sakaguchi. ... North American redirects here. ... Sony Computer Entertainment, Incorporated ) (SCEI) is a Japanese video game company specializing in a variety of areas in the video game industry, mostly in video game consoles and is a full subsidiary of Sony Corporation that was established on November 16, 1993 in Tokyo, Japan. ... Television system by country The PAL region is a video game publication territory which covers Australia, New Zealand, and varying European countries. ... Sony Computer Entertainment, Incorporated ) (SCEI) is a Japanese video game company specializing in a variety of areas in the video game industry, mostly in video game consoles and is a full subsidiary of Sony Corporation that was established on November 16, 1993 in Tokyo, Japan. ... In video games, an international version is a relocalized version of a previously released title in its native territory that has gained additional features and contents in foreign releases. ... Square Company, Limited ) was a Japanese video game company founded in September of 1983 by Masafumi Miyamoto and Hironobu Sakaguchi. ... Eidos Interactive is a publisher of video and computer games with its parent company based in England. ... A game designer is a person who designs games. ... Hironobu Sakaguchi ) (born November 25, 1962) is a Japanese game designer, game director and game producer. ... A game producer is the person in charge of overseeing development of a video game. ... A scenario (from the Italian, that which is pinned to the scenery) is a brief description of an event or a series of events. ... Square Enix producer Yoshinori Kitase has been credited on the following games: Final Fantasy X-2 Kingdom Hearts Final Fantasy X Final Fantasy Anthology Final Fantasy VIII Ehrgeiz: God Bless the Ring Final Fantasy VII Chrono Trigger Final Fantasy VI Final Fantasy V Final Fantasy Adventure He is currently working... A game director is a person who is in-charge of significant creative aspects of a video game. ... Tetsuya Nomura ) (born October 8, 1970) is a Japanese video game director and character designer working for Square Enix (formerly Square). ... Characterization is the process of creating characters in fiction, often those who are different from and have different beliefs than the author. ... Scenarist Kazushige Nojima is the founder of Stellavista Ltd. ... Yoshitaka Amano (天野 喜孝 Amano Yoshitaka, originally 天野 嘉孝 (pronounced the same), born July 28, 1952) is a Japanese artist, best known for his illustrations for Vampire Hunter D and for his character designs for the video game series Final Fantasy. ... Nobuo Uematsu , born March 21, 1959) is a Japanese composer of video game music, and one of the most well-known, prolific, and versatile in the field. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... This article is about the Final Fantasy franchise. ... In computing, a platform describes some sort of framework, either in hardware or software, which allows software to run. ... For other uses, see PlayStation (disambiguation). ... Windows redirects here. ... This article is about the country in East Asia. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... North American redirects here. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... In video games, an international version is a relocalized version of a previously released title in its native territory that has gained additional features and contents in foreign releases. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... North American redirects here. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Australasia Australasia is a term variably used to describe a region of Oceania: Australia, New Zealand, and neighbouring islands in the Pacific Ocean. ... Further information: Game classification Video games are categorized into genres based on their gameplay interaction. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A video game content rating system is a system used for the classification of video games into suitability-related groups. ... The Entertainment and Leisure Software Publishers Association (or ELSPA) is an organisation set up in 1989 by British software publishers. ... The ESRBs logo. ... The Office of Film and Literature Classification is a statutory censorship and classification body which provides day to day administrative support for the Classification Board which classified films, video games and publications in Australia, and the Classification Review Board which reviews films, computer games and publications when a valid application... PEGIs logo Pan European Game Information (PEGI) is a European video game content rating system. ... The USKs official logo. ... The CD-ROM (an abbreviation for Compact Disc Read-Only Memory (ROM)) is a non-volatile optical data storage medium using the same physical format as audio compact discs, readable by a computer with a CD-ROM drive. ... The CD-ROM (an abbreviation for Compact Disc Read-Only Memory (ROM)) is a non-volatile optical data storage medium using the same physical format as audio compact discs, readable by a computer with a CD-ROM drive. ... This article is about the SI unit of frequency. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... CPU redirects here. ... This article is about a unit of data. ... RAM redirects here. ... Microsoft DirectX is a collection of application programming interfaces for handling tasks related to multimedia, especially game programming and video, on Microsoft platforms. ... Typical hard drives of the mid-1990s. ... Windows 95 is a consumer-oriented graphical user interface-based operating system. ... A 104-key PC US English QWERTY keyboard layout The Dvorak Simplified Keyboard layout A standard Hebrew keyboard showing both Hebrew and QWERTY. A computer keyboard is a peripheral partially modelled after the typewriter keyboard. ... For other uses, see Joystick (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Square Company, Limited ) was a Japanese video game company founded in September of 1983 by Masafumi Miyamoto and Hironobu Sakaguchi. ... This article is about the Final Fantasy franchise. ... 1997 1997 in games 1996 in video gaming 1998 in video gaming Notable events of 1997 in video gaming. ... Sony Computer Entertainment, Incorporated ) (SCEI) is a Japanese video game company specializing in a variety of areas in the video game industry, mostly in video game consoles and is a full subsidiary of Sony Corporation that was established on November 16, 1993 in Tokyo, Japan. ... For other uses, see PlayStation (disambiguation). ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... Windows redirects here. ... This article is about process of creating 3D computer graphics. ... Pre-rendered graphics, in computer graphics, is a video footage which is not being rendered in real-time by the hardware that is outputing or playing back the video. ...


The game's story centers on a group of adventurers as they battle a powerful megacorporation called "Shinra", which is draining the life of the planet (Mako) to use as an energy source. As the story progresses, conflicts escalate and the world's safety becomes the central concern. Megacorporation is a term popularized by William Gibson derived from the combination of the prefix mega- with the word corporation. ...


A major critical and commercial success, the game remains arguably the most popular title in the series,[7][8][9][10] and is often credited with allowing console-style RPGs to achieve mainstream success outside Japan.[8] The ongoing popularity of the title led Square Enix to produce a series of sequels and prequels under the collective title "Compilation of Final Fantasy VII". As of September 2004, Final Fantasy VII has sold more than 9.5 million copies worldwide, earning it the position of the best-selling Final Fantasy title.[11] For other uses, see Sequel (disambiguation). ... A prequel is a work that portrays events which include the structure, conventions, and/or characters of a previously completed narrative, but occur at an earlier time. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Final Fantasy VII. (Discuss) Official series logo Compilation of Final Fantasy VII is the formal title for a series of games and films developed in 2004 and 2005 by Japanese console developer Square Enix. ...

Contents

Gameplay

Navigation on a town's field map

Like previous installments of the Final Fantasy series, Final Fantasy VII consists of three basic gameplay modes: an overworld map, town and dungeon field maps, and a battle screen. The overworld map is a 3D model, featuring a scaled-down simplified version of the game's fictional world,[4][12] which the player navigates to travel between the game's locations. It is the first Final Fantasy game to have character models with fully-rendered polygons, rather than flat two-dimensional sprites. As with the preceding games in the series, the world map can be traversed by foot or by other means of transportation, such as Chocobo, airship, submarine, etc.[12] On field maps, the game's 3D playable characters are directed across realistically scaled environments, consisting of 2D pre-rendered backgrounds that represent locations such as towns or forests.[4] The battle screen is a 3D representation of an area such as a building interior or grassland, in which the player commands the game's characters in battles against CPU-controlled enemies through a menu-driven interface.[4][13] While characters are miniaturised on maps, in combat their renderings are more realistic and normal-scaled. Image File history File links FFVIIfieldmapexample. ... Image File history File links FFVIIfieldmapexample. ... In computer and video games, the overworld generally refers to an out-door or world map section of the game, as opposed to a dungeon or level. In a typical RPGs, the player can usually save their game whenever they like, and will usually have a different appearance (to reflect... In games, a dungeon represents a dangerous area with many hidden secrets to explore. ... A fictional universe is an imaginary world that serves as the setting or backdrop for one or (more commonly) multiple works of fiction or translatable non-fiction. ... In computer graphics, a sprite (also known by other names; see Synonyms below) is a two-dimensional/three-dimensional image or animation that is integrated into a larger scene. ... A Chocobo ) is a fictional large, normally flightless galliforme/ratite bird capable of being ridden and is a staple of the Final Fantasy series. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... 2D computer graphics is the computer-based generation of digital images—mostly from two-dimensional models (such as 2D geometric models, text, and digital images) and by techniques specific to them. ... CPU redirects here. ...


Initially, the player is restricted to travel within a single city, Midgar, but as the game continues, more areas become accessible, and the player is given more freedom to explore.[12] Progression through the game's storyline is largely developed by way of scripted sequences, and require frequent player interaction to proceed. At other times, pre-rendered cinematic cut scenes advance the story. A cut scene or cutscene (sometimes also referred to as a cinematic) is a sequence in a video game over which the player has no control. ...


Combat

During its turn-based battle sequences, the game uses the same Active Time Battle (ATB) system designed by Hiroyuki Ito and first featured in Final Fantasy IV. Unlike previous games in the series, which allow 4–5 playable characters to participate in battle, Final Fantasy VII allows for only up to three characters to be present in the party at any one time.[4] Square Enix (formally Square Co. ... Hiroyuki Itō (JP:伊藤 裕之) is a game director and designer for Square Enix, and is most known for his work in the role-playing game series, Final Fantasy. ... Final Fantasy IV ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) in 1991 as a part of the Final Fantasy video game series. ...

A battle in Final Fantasy VII
A battle in Final Fantasy VII

Final Fantasy VII's skill system is built around the use of materia, magical orbs that are placed in special slots on weapons and armor, allowing players to customize their characters' access to magic spells, summons, and special abilities. In addition to their individual traits, materia can be used together in a fixed number of ways to enhance their effects or produce other abilities.[14][15] Image File history File linksMetadata FFVIIbattlexample. ... Image File history File linksMetadata FFVIIbattlexample. ... A statistic or stat, in role-playing games, is a piece of data which represents a particular aspect of a fictional character. ... Materia ) are small spheres of crystallized spiritual energy used in the magic system of Square Enixs role-playing game Final Fantasy VII. These spheres allow their users to cast various magic and use special abilities. ... Edea using an Ice-based limit break, Ice Strike in Final Fantasy VIII Magic is one of the two principal forms of attack in Square Enixs (formerly Square Co. ...


A modified form of Final Fantasy VI's Desperation Attacks appears here as the Limit Break.[16] Every playable character has a bar that gradually fills up when they suffer damage in battle. When the bar is completely filled, the character is able to unleash his or her Limit Break, a special attack which generally inflicts significantly more damage on enemies than normal attacks, or otherwise aids the party in battle. Unlike materia, which any character could use, each character had his/her own unique limit breaks. The style of limit break depended on the character. i.e. Cloud's limit breaks are comprised of many attacks all inflicting damage points, however Aeris' limit breaks are comprised of healing and other types of white magic. Character's also had their own ultimate limit break, which had to be obtained as an item in the game before a player could use it. [4][13] Character designer and battle director Tetsuya Nomura implemented this advanced form of Desperation Attacks in response to the low probability of their occurrence in Final Fantasy VI, where they would randomly become available as an attack substitution only when a character's hit points (a numerically based life bar) were low.[16] Final Fantasy VI ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) in 1994 as a part of the Final Fantasy series. ... Limit Breaks (sometimes shortened to just Limits) are powerful combat moves featured in Squaresofts Final Fantasy games. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy the notability guideline for Fiction. ... Tetsuya Nomura ) (born October 8, 1970) is a Japanese video game director and character designer working for Square Enix (formerly Square). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Screenshot of Metal Gear Solid. ...


Nomura decided to incorporate elaborately animated summon spells in the game, one of which lasts more than a minute.[16] This idea became popular with Final Fantasy fans, and they were incorporated into the development of future games in the series. A summon consisted of a name for each summon materia, the name of the attack used by each summon, a short animation clip in which the summoned monster makes his attack, and the end of the attack, in which the attacker is showed the amount of damage points inflicted. [16] However, critics have described these animations as tedious.[17] Edea using an Ice-based limit break, Ice Strike in Final Fantasy VIII Magic is one of the two principal forms of attack in Square Enixs (formerly Square Co. ...


Plot

Setting

World map of Final Fantasy VII

The game's setting follows in the footsteps of Final Fantasy VI by presenting a world with considerably more advanced technology than the first five games in the series. Overall, the game's technology and society approximates that of modern or near-future science fiction.[18][19] The world of Final Fantasy VII, retroactively named "Gaia"[20] but referred to in the game as "The Planet", is composed of three land masses. The eastern continent features the city of Midgar, an industrial metropolis that serves as the headquarters of the Shinra Electric Power Company, a ruthless mega corporation that operates as the de facto world government. Shinra's major military base, Junon, is also located on the continent, along with a chocobo ranch and a small town called Kalm. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Gaia is the fictional world in the 1997 console role-playing game Final Fantasy VII. The games setting follows in the footsteps of Final Fantasy VI by presenting a world with considerably more advanced technology than the first five games in the series. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... For other uses, see Metropolis (disambiguation). ... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without... World empire redirects here. ...


The western continent features most of the playable areas, which include the Gold Saucer (an amusement park), a seaside resort, and a settlement constructed on a plateau called "Cosmo Canyon". The tribe inhabiting the canyon places a strong emphasis on living in harmony with nature and dedicate great consideration to the planet's well-being.[21] Their settlement features an observatory and serves as a research facility for those who wish to participate in a philosophy known as "the Study of Planet Life", an environmentally conscious way of life that encourages utmost deference for nature, and teaches that the planet has a life of its own.[21] The northernmost continent is a heavily glaciated wasteland covered in snow and ice, with its few settlements largely concerned with excavation or research. It does, however, feature a ski resort. There are also underwater locations accessible via submarine. This article is about scientific observatories. ... Perito Moreno Glacier Patagonia Argentina Aletsch Glacier, Switzerland Icebergs breaking off glaciers at Cape York, Greenland This article is about the geological formation. ...


Characters

Tetsuya Nomura's designs of the main playable characters in Final Fantasy VII
Tetsuya Nomura's designs of the main playable characters in Final Fantasy VII

The nine main playable characters in Final Fantasy VII are Cloud Strife, an unsociable mercenary who serves as the game's protagonist and claims to be a former 1st Class member of Shinra's SOLDIER unit;[22] Aeris Gainsborough (named "Aerith" in the Japanese promotional materials, later Final Fantasy VII titles and the Kingdom Hearts series), a flower merchant living in the slums of Midgar who has been pursued by Shinra operatives since she was a child;[23][24] Tifa Lockhart, a martial artist and childhood friend of Cloud's; Barret Wallace, the impatient leader of the second incarnation of the anti-Shinra eco-terrorist group AVALANCHE, who bears a grudge against the corporation for razing his hometown, and causing the deaths of his friends and family;[25] Red XIII, also known as Nanaki, a wise lion/dog-like creature capable of speech who was experimented on by Shinra scientists; Yuffie Kisaragi, an experienced thief, and a young, bitter resident of Wutai, a nation descended from ninja which was defeated by Shinra in a war several years before the events of Final Fantasy VII began;[26][27] Cid Highwind, a pilot whose dreams of being the first man in outer space were crushed when he canceled his rocket's launch to save the life of one of his assistants, leading to the withdrawing of the Shinra Company's funding of a space program;[28][29] Cait Sith, a fortune-telling semi-autonomous robotic cat who rides a magically animated stuffed moogle doll;[30] and Vincent Valentine, a former member of Shinra's Turks unit who was killed and brought back to life as an immortal through experimental anatomic reconstruction.[31][32][33] Squares Final Fantasy VII was one of the first major console role-playing games released for the Sony PlayStation and was Squares largest game at the time. ... Image File history File links FFVIInomuracastdesigns. ... Image File history File links FFVIInomuracastdesigns. ... Cloud Strife ) is the main protagonist in Squares (now Square Enix) role-playing game Final Fantasy VII and several of its sequels and spin-offs. ... For other uses, see Mercenary (disambiguation). ... Aerith Gainsborough )—known as Aeris Gainsborough in the English translations of Final Fantasy VII and Final Fantasy Tactics—is a female protagonist in SquareSofts (now Square Enix) role-playing game Final Fantasy VII. In Final Fantasy VII, Aeris is a 22-year-old flower girl who joins AVALANCHE. As... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Tifa Lockhart ), is a female protagonist from Squaresofts blockbuster RPG, Final Fantasy VII designed by Tetsuya Nomura. ... Barret Wallace ) is a player character in the role playing game Final Fantasy VII. Early in the game, he is the leader of a militant eco-group called AVALANCHE, located in Midgar, though this position later passes to Cloud Strife. ... Eco-terrorism or ecoterrorism is the concept of terrorism conducted for the sake of ecological or environmental causes. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Characters of Final Fantasy VII. (Discuss) For the EP by the band Journey, see Red 13. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Jiraiya, ninja and title character of the Japanese folktale Jiraiya Goketsu Monogatari. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Layers of Atmosphere - not to scale (NOAA)[1] Outer space, sometimes simply called space, refers to the relatively empty regions of the universe outside the atmospheres of celestial bodies. ... Cait Sith ) is a playable character in the Squaresoft role playing game Final Fantasy VII, and is a recurring element in the Final Fantasy series. ... For prophecy in the context of revealed religions see Prophet. ... Different Types of Moogles Mogri summon from Final Fantasy Tactics Mog (Final Fantasy VII - PC) Moogles , originally Romanized in Japan as Moglie; however, more recent materials are consistent with the English spelling) are small fictional creatures that appear throughout the Final Fantasy, Mana (Seiken Densetsu) and Kingdom Hearts game series. ... Vincent Valentine ) is a secret playable character in the PlayStation RPG Final Fantasy VII and is in its CGI film sequel Final Fantasy VII Advent Children. ... The Fountain of Eternal Life in Cleveland, Ohio Immortality (or eternal life) is the concept of living in physical or spiritual form for an infinite length of time, or in a state of timelessness. ...


All of the game's main characters have had significant ties to the Shinra Company in their past, and all harbor disapproval or outright hatred for the corporation and its activities. Although the antagonists for the first portion of the game are the Shinra executives, a mysterious man named Sephiroth—once hailed as the greatest SOLDIER—reappears several years after disappearing in a battle in which he was concluded to have died.[34][35] He is soon revealed to be the most immediate threat to the planet, prompting both AVALANCHE and the Shinra Company to take up the position of defending it, though their methods differ significantly.[36] Squares Final Fantasy VII was one of the first major console role-playing games released for the Sony PlayStation and was Squares largest game at the time. ... Sephiroth ) is a fictional character and recurring villain in Squares (now Square Enix) role-playing game, Final Fantasy VII. He was designed by character designer Tetsuya Nomura and is characterized as a tall man with long silver hair. ...


The game's character designer, Tetsuya Nomura, has expressed feeling that Final Fantasy VII was hindered by graphical limitations, and that his designs were, consequently, very plain in comparison to his "true" style.[16] However, he was able to find other means of expressing some of his ideas. Cloud's original character design called for slicked back black hair with no spikes, intended to serve as a contrast to Sephiroth's long, flowing silver hair. To give Cloud a unique feature that would emphasize his role in the game as the main character, Nomura changed the design to feature Cloud's now trademark shock of spiky, bright blond hair.[16] For Tifa's design, Nomura has admitted to facing a difficult decision in choosing to give her a miniskirt or pants. With input from other members of the game's development staff, he eventually selected a dark miniskirt, contrasted by Aeris' long, pink dress.[16]


Vincent's character developed from horror researcher to detective, then to chemist, and finally to the figure of a former Turk with a tragic past. It has been explained that his crimson mantle was added to symbolize the idea of carrying a heavy weight on his shoulders associated with death. Nomura has indicated that Cid Highwind's fighting style resembles that of a Dragon Knight, a character class so chosen because his last name is the same as that of two previous Dragon Knights featured in the Final Fantasy series, Ricard Highwind of Final Fantasy II and Kain Highwind of Final Fantasy IV.[16] The Dragon Knight ) is a character class (or job) featured in Square Enixs Final Fantasy series of computer role-playing games. ... This article is about a concept in role-playing games. ... // This article is about characters from the Famicom title. ... Final Fantasy II on the SNES, see Final Fantasy IV Foundation for a Free Information Infrastructure Final Fantasy II ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) in 1988 for the Nintendo Family Computer (Famicom, known internationally as the Nintendo Entertainment System) as a... Kain Highwind , Cain Highwind in the original Japanese language version) is a fictional character in the Square Co. ... Final Fantasy IV ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) in 1991 as a part of the Final Fantasy video game series. ...


Due to their popularity, several characters from the game have made cameo appearances in other Square Enix titles, most notably the fighting game Ehrgeiz and the popular Final Fantasy-Disney crossover series Kingdom Hearts. Sephiroth remains one of the most popular villains in video game history, unanimously voted #1 by the staff of gaming publication Electronic Gaming Monthly in their "Top 10 Video Game Bosses" list in October 2005.[37] During spring of the same year, the character won GameFAQs' best villain contest.[38] A cameo role or cameo appearance (often shortened to just cameo) is a brief appearance of a known person in a work of the performing arts, such as plays, films, video games and television. ... This article describes fighting games in which opponents face off in a battle. ... Ehrgeiz: God Bless the Ring (German: lit. ... Disney redirects here. ... Unanimity is near complete agreement by everyone. ... A video game magazine is a magazine that talks about video games on PC, other computers or video game consoles. ... Electronic Gaming Monthly (often abbreviated to EGM) is an American video game magazine. ... Flag Ship from the video game Gorf A boss is an enemy-based challenge in video games that, once encountered, stops the games progression until the player is able either to surmount the enemy or is thwarted by it. ... GameFAQs is a website that hosts FAQs and walkthroughs for video games. ...


Plot

Final Fantasy VII begins with Cloud joining AVALANCHE in a series of raids against the Mako reactors that surround the city of Midgar. Although the first mission is a success, AVALANCHE is trapped at another reactor during a subsequent raid. The reactor explodes, which sends Cloud flying from the upper levels of Midgar into the slums below. He lands unharmed on a flower bed, where he is formally introduced to Aeris.[39] Prompted by the arrival of operatives of the Shinra Company's Turks organization sent to capture Aeris, Cloud agrees to work for Aeris as her bodyguard.[40] Image File history File links Broom_icon. ...


After Cloud defends Aeris from her would-be kidnappers, Aeris offers to show him the way back to Sector 7. Along the way, she mentions that her first boyfriend had been a first Class SOLDIER, as Cloud claims to have been. They then meet up with Tifa Lockhart, and the three infiltrate the mansion of crime boss Don Corneo. From him, the party learns that Shinra has discovered the location of AVALANCHE's hideout and plans to collapse the upper level of Sector 7 onto the slums below.[41] Despite AVALANCHE's efforts to prevent it, Shinra successfully destroys Sector 7, killing its population and three members of AVALANCHE. The Turks finally capture Aeris, who the player learns is the last living member of the "Cetra,"[42] a race closely attuned with the planet. President Shinra believes that Aeris can lead him to a mythical land of fertility known as the "Promised Land", which he expects to be ripe with easily harvested Mako energy.[43] Squares Final Fantasy VII was one of the first major console role-playing games released for the Sony PlayStation and was Squares largest game at the time. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


The remaining members of AVALANCHE—Cloud, Tifa, and Barret—infiltrate Shinra's headquarters to rescue Aeris. After freeing her and Red XIII, who joins the party, they escape when most of the personnel in the building—including President Shinra—are killed. Finding the body of the president skewered by a long sword, Cloud suspects a man called Sephiroth has returned from his presumed death. These suspicions are confirmed by an executive spared during the massacre, who claims to have witnessed Sephiroth murder the president and state that he would never allow Shinra to claim the Promised Land.[44] The party also learns that during Sephiroth's attack on Shinra, the headless body of a creature named "Jenova" disappeared from the building's research facility.[45] Jenova in Final Fantasy VII Advent Children Jenova ) is a fictional video game character, and is one of the major antagonists in the PlayStation and computer role-playing game, Final Fantasy VII. The character also appears in a retelling of a section of the game in the original video animation...


While Rufus Shinra, the president's son, assumes control of the Shinra Company, AVALANCHE pursues Sephiroth across the planet, fearing his intentions for the Promised Land may be more destructive than Shinra's. During this pursuit, the party is joined by Yuffie, Cait Sith, Vincent and Cid. As the journey progresses, each member of the group must come to terms with personal conflicts from their past, and the full scope of Sephiroth's plan is eventually revealed to the player: if the planet is significantly damaged, the Lifestream within will gather at the point of injury, attempting to heal the wound. Sephiroth explains that he intends to use a powerful spell known as "Meteor" to fatally injure the planet, inciting a reaction in the Lifestream to heal the wound before it can cause the planet's destruction. Entering the fissure created by the meteor's impact, Sephiroth would merge with all the energy of the planet, granting him god-like power over it.[46] At an ancient temple erected by the Cetra, AVALANCHE attempts to undermine Sephiroth's plot by claiming the Black Materia needed to activate Meteor, but Sephiroth displays a mysterious power over Cloud, forcing him to relinquish it. Rufus Shinra ) is a non-player character in Squares (Now Square-Enix) RPG Final Fantasy VII. His appearance is marked by neatly-groomed blonde hair, blue eyes and a white three-piece suit with a distinctive double-breasted jacket. ... Materia ) are small spheres of crystallized spiritual energy used in the magic system of Square Enixs role-playing game Final Fantasy VII. These spheres allow their users to cast various magic and use special abilities. ... Materia ) are small spheres of crystallized spiritual energy used in the magic system of Square Enixs role-playing game Final Fantasy VII. These spheres allow their users to cast various magic and use special abilities. ...

Sephiroth kills Aeris in a scene referred to as "the most shocking moment in video games".
Sephiroth kills Aeris in a scene referred to as "the most shocking moment in video games".[47]

Fearing that Sephiroth may cast Meteor, Aeris sets off to stop him on her own. Concerned for her safety, AVALANCHE follows her to the northern continent, where the player enters an ancient Cetra city. After finding Aeris praying to the planet for aid, Sephiroth, unseen, begins affecting Cloud's behavior once again, and attempts to force him to kill her. Cloud resists Sephiroth's command, but Sephiroth himself appears and kills Aeris.[37][48] After laying her body to rest, the surviving characters resolve to defeat Sephiroth and avenge her. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...


Later, Sephiroth begins causing Cloud to doubt his ability to control his own actions. Cloud begins to doubt his memories and insists that he is not a real human, but rather a specimen created from Jenova's genetic material by Professor Hojo. Jenova, the player learns, was an interstellar creature who crashlanded on the planet approximately two thousand years earlier, arriving via travel on a meteor. This collision formed a large impact crater, grievously harming the planet.[49][50] Jenova soon emerged from the crater, intending to infect all living organisms on the planet with a virus that would induce insanity and incite monstrous transformations.[51] Among its victims were most of the Cetra, who were approached when Jenova used its mimic abilities to appear as their relatives. Attempting to defend itself, the planet created giant monsters called "WEAPONs", while the majority of humans fled rather than fight Jenova. However, a small group of Cetra survivors fought to defend the planet and managed to defeat Jenova, confining it within the fissure created by its landing.[52] Afterward, the WEAPONs entered hibernation to await any future threat that could harm the planet. Eventually, the mummified remains of Jenova would be unearthed by Professor Gast, a researcher for the Shinra Company. Mistaking the creature for a Cetra, Gast was given authorization to conduct an experiment to artificially produce a Cetra by combining cells from Jenova with the fetus of an unborn child.[51] Squares Final Fantasy VII was one of the first major console role-playing games released for the Sony PlayStation and was Squares largest game at the time. ... Tycho crater on Earths moon. ... A mimic is any species that has evolved to appear similar to another successful species in order to dupe predators into avoiding the mimic, or dupe prey into approaching the mimic. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Monsters of Final Fantasy. ... Squares Final Fantasy VII was one of the first major console role-playing games released for the Sony PlayStation and was Squares largest game at the time. ...


Five years before the present-day events, in a cutscene seen by the player, Sephiroth learned that he was the product of this experiment while on a Shinra mission in Nibelheim, the hometown of Cloud and Tifa. However, unaware of all details involved, he concluded that he was a Cetra who had been produced solely from Jenova's genetic material. Enraged, he burned down the town, intending to kill all descendants of those he believed had abandoned his ancestors in the defense of the planet. According to Cloud, he confronted Sephiroth during this massacre, after which Sephiroth vanished under unknown circumstances and was presumed dead until his reappearance in the Shinra building. When AVALANCHE reaches the Northern Crater, Sephiroth tells Cloud that he was not in Nibelheim, showing him images of a 1st Class SOLDIER with dark hair who occupies Cloud's place in his memories.[53] With Tifa unable to refute Sephiroth's claims, Cloud goes crazy and, thinking it the right thing to do, gives the black materia to Sephiroth's real body, which is encased in crystalized Mako, which results in the WEAPONs' awakening. During the earthquake that follows, Cloud is separated from his companions and falls into the Lifestream.


As the meteor summoned by Sephiroth slowly approaches the planet, the Shinra Company focuses its efforts on protecting humanity from the WEAPONs,[36] who have begun to perceive everything as a threat to the planet. The members of AVALANCHE are interrogated, and eventually nearly executed. They escape from Junon, and obtain Cid's airship Highwind. They then search for Cloud. They discover Shinra's plan to take Huge Materia from the major spots of the world. Barret Wallace saves his hometown from Shinra's escort, thus redeeming himself for building the Mako reactor there in the first place. They eventually find Cloud, locating him on a tropical resort island called Mideel where he washed up following the casting of Meteor; he is in a catatonic state. Unable to see Cloud like this, Tifa resolves that she will not leave Mideel until Cloud has fully recovered. The WEAPONs' destructive activity quickly causes the island to split open, depositing Cloud and Tifa into the Lifestream below. There, she reconstructs Cloud's memories and learns the truth about his past. Although the player learns that he is a real human being and had actually been in Nibelheim during Sephiroth's attack, he never actually succeeded in joining SOLDIER and only managed to attain the rank of private in Shinra's military. The player learns that the previously-seen dark-haired SOLDIER is named "Zack", and was Aeris' first boyfriend. During Sephiroth's destruction of Nibelheim, Zack, Tifa and Cloud fought Sephiroth in Nibelheim's Mako reactor. Although Tifa and Zack were defeated, Cloud and Sephiroth severely wounded one another. After decapitating the body of Jenova, which had been stored in the Mako reactor, Sephiroth is thrown into the Lifestream by Cloud, taking the creature's head with him. Rather than dying, however, his body and consciousness were crystalized in Mako inside Jenova's crater. This is a page about catatonic state. ... A Private is a soldier of the lowest military rank (equivalent to Nato Rank Grades OR-1 to OR-3 depending on the force served in). ... Zack Fair ) is a non-player character from the role-playing game Final Fantasy VII and the protagonist of both its prequels, Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII and the OVA Last Order: Final Fantasy VII. Though he appears only in flashback sequences in the original game, he is portrayed as...


While Tifa was taken to safety in Midgar, Cloud and Zack were among the wounded survivors who were apprehended by Shinra as part an elaborate cover-up of Sephiroth's massacre. Professor Hojo subjected these survivors to an experiment, in which he performed the same enhancements given to members of SOLDIER. However, because Hojo conducted the experiment without any concern for the subjects' mental capacities to handle the procedure, all but Zack entered a comatose state. Nearly five years later, Zack broke free from his confinement and took Cloud with him. The player learns that the procedure used to enhance members of SOLDIER involved both Mako showers and the injection of cells from Jenova. The alien cells inhabiting Cloud's body allowed his mind to construct a false persona, built around Zack's behavior, fighting style, and description of Sephiroth's destruction in Nibelheim, but they also allowed Sephiroth to modulate his behavior. The cells' inherent ability to duplicate information led Cloud to believe that he had been the 1st Class SOLDIER in Nibelheim, as Zack was shot and killed outside Midgar by pursuing Shinra soldiers, shortly before the beginning of the game. Afterward, Tifa discovered Cloud, who was wearing Zack's spare uniform, and offered him a job with AVALANCHE.[51] This article is about a short-lived television series. ... For other uses, see Coma (disambiguation). ...


With the truth revealed, Cloud awakens and rejoins AVALANCHE. Before he awakened, the few members of AVALANCHE recovered powerful magic, known as Huge Materia, to counter Shinra's attempts to destroy the WEAPONs and Meteor. During the next few segments, many members achieve their lifelong dreams, or settle their past. Among these are that Cid Highwind became the first man in outer space, Yuffie Kisaragi encourages her father to return her hometown Wutai to its former glory, and Vincent Valentine learns the truth about his past. The player also learns that, in her final moments, Aeris was casting a spell known as "Holy", the only means of opposing Meteor. Though she succeeds, Sephiroth's focused will prevents the spell from taking effect and has been restraining it since. Deciding that humanity must be protected from the WEAPONs before Sephiroth can be approached, Shinra and AVALANCHE destroy the WEAPONs, but nearly all of Shinra's executives are killed in the process, seemingly including Rufus. Among the few survivors are Reeve Tuesti, revealed to be the repentant controller of Cait Sith,[54] and Professor Hojo, who is revealed to be Sephiroth's biological father. He explains that he and his wife were assistants to Professor Gast, and offered up their unborn child as a test subject to research involving Jenova.[51][55] When Hojo attempts to help Sephiroth to gain mastery over the Lifestream afterward, AVALANCHE is given no choice but to fight and kill him. Cloud tells the remaining members of his team to go find what they are fighting for. Every member returns, including Cait Sith, who had been captured by Shinra Inc. for helping Cloud. Materia ) are small spheres of crystallized spiritual energy used in the magic system of Square Enixs role-playing game Final Fantasy VII. These spheres allow their users to cast various magic and use special abilities. ... Squares Final Fantasy VII was one of the first major console role-playing games released for the Sony PlayStation and was Squares largest game at the time. ...


Red XIII's grandfather dies, and tells him to go with Cloud to the final battle. With each member of Cloud's group at peace with his or her past and all other opponents defeated, the group travels through the mantle of the planet to its core, where they defeat Sephiroth and free Holy. However, due to Meteor's already close proximity to the planet's surface, Holy is unable to destroy it alone. Selected as Meteor's target, Midgar is almost completely destroyed by the storms that spawn from its presence. However, sent by Aeris' spirit, the Lifestream itself rises from the planet to aid Holy by pushing Meteor away, allowing Holy to destroy it.[56] During the epilogue that follows, Red XIII looks down on the ruins of Midgar, shown five hundred years later. While the landscape had once been desolate due to Shinra's operations, it is now a land of lush greenery. The player does not know what happened to the rest of the team. Earth cutaway from core to exosphere. ...


Development

Early development and Final Fantasy SGI

An early screenshot of the original demo version, featuring Aeris and Barret with Cloud
See also: Final Fantasy VI#Interactive CG Game

At its conception stage, the original script of Final Fantasy VII, written by Hironobu Sakaguchi, was completely different from the finished product. Tetsuya Nomura recalled how Sakaguchi "wanted to do something like a detective story". The first part of the story, said Nomura, involved a character named "Hot Blooded Detective Joe" who was in pursuit of the main characters. The main characters managed to blow up the city of Midgar, which had already been developed for the story.[57] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 767 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (806 × 630 pixel, file size: 71 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Another development picture of Final Fantasy VII. This is a screenshot of a copyrighted video or computer game, and the copyright for it is most... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 767 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (806 × 630 pixel, file size: 71 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Another development picture of Final Fantasy VII. This is a screenshot of a copyrighted video or computer game, and the copyright for it is most... Final Fantasy VI ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) in 1994 as a part of the Final Fantasy series. ...


Development of Final Fantasy VII began in late 1995,[48][58] and required the efforts of more than one hundred artists and programmers[58][59] using such software as PowerAnimator and Softimage|3D,[48] and a budget of approximately US$45 million. Final Fantasy VI's co-director and scenario writer, Yoshinori Kitase, returned to direct and co-write this installment of the series and expressed a concern that the franchise might be left behind if it did not catch up to the 3D computer graphics used in other games at the time.[3] Development then began after the development of a short, experimental technical demo for Silicon Graphics Onyx workstations.[58] 1995 1995 in games 1994 in video gaming 1996 in video gaming Notable events of 1995 in video gaming. ... PowerAnimator and Animator, the precursor to what is now Maya and StudioTools, was an expensive, complex, highly-integrated industrial 3D modeling, animation, and visual effects suite. ... A Canadian 46¢ stamp honoring Softimage. ... USD redirects here. ... Final Fantasy VI ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) in 1994 as a part of the Final Fantasy series. ... This article is about process of creating 3D computer graphics. ... A technology demo is a prototype, rough example or an otherwise incomplete version of a product, put together with the primary purpose of showcasing the idea, performance, method or the features of the product. ... Silicon Graphics, Inc. ...


Called "Final Fantasy SGI", the demo featured polygon-based 3D renderings of characters from Final Fantasy VI in a real-time battle and incorporated interactive elements.[58][60][61] This experiment led the development team to decide to integrate these design mechanics into Final Fantasy VII.[58] However, as a result of the high quantity of memory storage required to implement the motion data, 3D models and computer graphics effects involved, it was decided that only the CD-ROM format would be able to suit the project's needs.[48][58][60] Nintendo, for whom Square had developed all previous titles in the Final Fantasy series, had decided to continue to use cartridges for their upcoming Nintendo 64 console. This eventually led to a dispute and as a result, Square eventually decided to end their long, often tumultuous, relationship with Nintendo and announced on January 12, 1996 that they would be developing Final Fantasy VII for Sony's PlayStation system.[48][60] Polygons are used in computer graphics to compose images that are three-dimensional in appearance. ... Real-time is a term used to describe a motion picture, television or radio program, or computer game wherein the events depicted take place entirely within the span of time that lasts from the beginning of the depiction to the end, and at the same rate. ... This article is about the scientific discipline of computer graphics. ... The CD-ROM (an abbreviation for Compact Disc Read-Only Memory (ROM)) is a non-volatile optical data storage medium using the same physical format as audio compact discs, readable by a computer with a CD-ROM drive. ... For the video game system, see Nintendo Entertainment System. ... Cartridge for the VIC 20 homecomputer In various types of electronic equipment, a cartridge can refer one method of adding different functionality or content (e. ... The Nintendo 64, often abbreviated as N64, is Nintendos third home video game console for the international market. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Sony Computer Entertainment, Incorporated ) (SCEI) is a Japanese video game company specializing in a variety of areas in the video game industry, mostly in video game consoles and is a full subsidiary of Sony Corporation that was established on November 16, 1993 in Tokyo, Japan. ... For other uses, see PlayStation (disambiguation). ...


In 1996, a demonstration disc was released to those who attended Tokyo Game Show.[62] This disc, called Square's Preview Extra, contained the earliest playable demo of Final Fantasy VII as well as the 1995 Siggraph demonstration called Final Fantasy SGI.[63] The demo available on the disc allowed players to play through the first part of Midgar. However, while all the text is in Japanese, there are some noticeable differences, mainly the presence of Aeris in the initial party.[64] Gamers play Sonys PS3 in TGS 2006 Booths at the Tokyo Game Show in 2004 The Tokyo Game Show , or simply TGS) is a video game expo / convention held in Tokyo, Japan. ... Midgar Midgar is a fictional city and de-facto capital of the world in the RPG Final Fantasy VII. It is controlled by the Shinra Company. ...


Changes from past installments

The transition from 2D computer graphics to 3D environments overlaid on pre-rendered backgrounds[4][5][6] was accompanied by a focus on a more realistic presentation, which challenged the development team. According to Kitase, "Right from the time the decision to go with CD was made he [producer Hironobu Sakaguchi] set down a ground rule for the team saying, 'If the player becomes aware of the access times, we have failed'", demanding that an immersive atmosphere be upheld, which led to the programming of various animations to activate while the game loaded data.[48] While the extra storage capacity and computer graphics to which the team now had access gave them the means to implement more than 40 minutes of full motion video movies[48]—an unprecedented undertaking in the genre at the time[48]—this innovation brought with it the added difficulty of ensuring that the inferiority of the in-game graphics in comparison to the full motion video sequences was not too obvious. Kitase has described the process of making the in-game environments as detailed as possible to be "a daunting task".[48] 2D computer graphics is the computer-based generation of digital images—mostly from two-dimensional models (such as 2D geometric models, text, and digital images) and by techniques specific to them. ... Pre-rendered graphics, in computer graphics, is a video footage which is not being rendered in real-time by the hardware that is outputing or playing back the video. ... A game producer is the person in charge of overseeing development of a video game. ... Hironobu Sakaguchi ) (born November 25, 1962) is a Japanese game designer, game director and game producer. ... Screenshot of an FMV from Final Fantasy VIII using Bink Video. ...


Among the difficulties faced was the potential inability to render 3D polygon models based on the designs of Yoshitaka Amano, the series' long-time character designer. As his style was considered too exquisite to be compatible with the visual format of the project, this issue was addressed by bringing Tetsuya Nomura onboard as the project's main artist, while Amano aided in the design of the game's world map. Previously a monster designer for Final Fantasy V,[65] Nomura's style was more reminiscent of manga, and considered easier to adapt. Another problem faced during development was a rushed production schedule. Veteran series composer Nobuo Uematsu commented in the liner notes of the game's soundtrack: "There is one thing common in all the Final Fantasy games. None of them are complete". Despite delaying the game's release from December 1996 to January 1997, several additions to gameplay and story needed to be made for the game's North American release,[5] prompting a rerelease in Japan under the title "Final Fantasy VII International". Yoshitaka Amano (天野 喜孝 Amano Yoshitaka, originally 天野 嘉孝 (pronounced the same), born July 28, 1952) is a Japanese artist, best known for his illustrations for Vampire Hunter D and for his character designs for the video game series Final Fantasy. ... “FF5” redirects here. ... This article is about the comics created in Japan. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... Nobuo Uematsu , born March 21, 1959) is a Japanese composer of video game music, and one of the most well-known, prolific, and versatile in the field. ... Final Fantasy VII Original Sound Track is a soundtrack album of video game music from the computer role-playing game Final Fantasy VII, produced by Square Co. ...


Design and inspirations

Art director Yusuke Naora refers to the game's atmosphere as "strong [and] dark",[66] achieved through lighting effects that he considers "the darkest of darkest",[67] and a story that emphasised realism while drawing on a variety of myths, legends, and religious and philosophical systems to "[use] as a framework for loftier ethical aspirations and ecologically conscious evangelism".[3][48] These concepts were reflected in names, such as "Sephiroth",[68] Cloud's personal conflicts, the permanence of Aeris' death and the plot element of the Lifestream.[48][3] Tetsuya Nomura has explained that, during the early stages of development, the game was to have featured only Cloud, Barret and Aeris, with the intention that one of the three would die.[3] Feeling that Cloud could not die due to his leading role and that the death of characters such as Barret was already too great a cliché in the Final Fantasy series and fiction in general, he expressed frustration with the frequent presentation of death in fiction as an awe-inspiring, often romantic idea centered around sacrifice and resurrection. As a result, he suggested that Aeris die and not return, believing the audience would not expect such a development and that it would emphasise the sudden, harsh, and irreversible nature of death.[3][48] Alternatively, Sakaguchi based the philosophy of the Lifestream on ideas from cultures who believe in an invisible, inextinguishable energy that permeates planets and all life upon them, and was given its in-game representation by Kitase.[48] Yusuke Naora is an art director and character designer for the video game coporation Square Enix. ...


Members of the development team have revealed that they intended some aspects of the game's story to be left open to the interpretation of individual players.[16][69][70] Scenario writer Kazushige Nojima has explained that he intended players to feel encouraged to speculate about what Cloud might be thinking in certain situations rather than be provided with actual insight into what he felt.[18][48] The game's ending left the fate of the characters ambiguous until the release of Final Fantasy VII Advent Children in 2005,[71][72] but the ultimate fate of humanity remained unclear nonetheless. At the time of Advent Children's release, Kitase suggested that the game's epilogue may signify the extinction of human beings.[3] However, Nomura has since stated that the game's final scene symbolizes humans living in harmony with nature,[73] and Square has provided explanations for other details of the game's plot with the publication of the Final Fantasy VII Ultimania Ω guidebook. Scenarist Kazushige Nojima is the founder of Stellavista Ltd. ... Final Fantasy VII Advent Children[1] ) is a 2005 computer-animated film directed by Tetsuya Nomura, co-directed by Takeshi Nozue, written by Kazushige Nojima and based on the highly successful 1997 console role-playing game Final Fantasy VII. The film is set two years after Final Fantasy VII and... Ultimania (Japanese: アルティマニア Arutimania) is a series of comprehensive video game guides published by Square-Enix (formerly under the title of their now disbanded publishing subsidiary, DigiCube) in Japan. ...


North American release

The game's release in North America was preceded by a massive three month marketing campaign for which Sony allocated a US$100 million budget. The high-profile campaign consisted of three 30-second television commercials on major networks, a holiday promotion with Pepsi, and printed ads in publications such as Rolling Stone, Details, Spin, Playboy and comic books published by Marvel and DC.[74][75] In 1998, Final Fantasy VII was ported to Windows-based PCs. This re-release featured smoother graphics and fixed certain translation and spelling errors, as well as various gameplay-related glitches. However, the PC version also suffered from its own bugs, including errors in the display of some full motion videos when rendering in hardware mode on certain graphics chipsets.[76][77] Pepsi Cola is a non-alcoholic carbonated beverage produced and manufactured by PepsiCo. ... This article is about the magazine. ... Cover of an issue of Details magazine Details, a monthly mens magazine, is published by Condé Nast Publications. ... Spin is a music magazine that reports on all the music that rocks. Founded in 1985 by publisher Bob Guccione, Jr. ... For other uses, see Playboy (disambiguation). ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... In computer science, porting is the process of adapting software so that an executable program can be created for a computing environment that is different from the one for which it was originally designed (e. ... Windows redirects here. ... A stylised illustration of a personal computer A personal computer (PC) is a computer whose original sales price, size, and capabilities make it useful for individuals, intended to be operated directly by an end user, with no intervening computer operator. ...


Music

The soundtrack for Final Fantasy VII was composed by Nobuo Uematsu. Instead of recorded music and sound effects for the game, Uematsu opted for MIDIs, using the PlayStation's own internal sound chip. He has explained that he chose this method because it allowed the console's CPU to process audio data more quickly, which in turn allowed it to focus more on processing the game's 3D engine and to prevent noticeable load times. The game was originally intended to feature a vocal piece, but this was cut due to the limitations imposed by recorded audio. However, a song with synthesized choral backing is heard in "One-Winged Angel". The music of the video game Final Fantasy VII was written by regular series composer Nobuo Uematsu. ... Nobuo Uematsu , born March 21, 1959) is a Japanese composer of video game music, and one of the most well-known, prolific, and versatile in the field. ... MIDI redirects here. ... A sound chip is an integrated circuit (i. ... Vocal music is music performed by one or more singers, with or without non-vocal instrumental accompaniment, in which singing provides the main focus of the piece. ... One-Winged Angel is played during the fight against Safer Sephiroth. ...


The game's soundtrack was commercially released on four compact discs;[78][79] a single-disc album of selected tracks from the Original Soundtrack and three selected arranged tracks, entitled "Final Fantasy VII: Reunion Tracks", was released separately.[80][81] A piano-only arrangement of selected tracks has also been produced,[82] and several remixed versions of tracks from the game have surfaced in subsequent Square productions, including Final Fantasy VII Advent Children[83][84] and Kingdom Hearts.[85] CD redirects here. ... In music, an arrangement refers either to a rewriting of a piece of existing music with additional new material or to a fleshing-out of a compositional sketch, such as a lead sheet. ...


On September 14, 2007, OverClocked ReMix, a website dedicated to the preservation and interpretation of video game music, released a community driven Final Fantasy VII tribute album, entitled Voices of the Lifestream.[86] The compilation reinterprets many of the soundtrack's most memorable pieces in various genres, such as rock, jazz, classical, and electronica. The album has been met with mass approval from various video game music sites, notable performers, and professional composers.[87] OverClocked ReMix, also known as OC ReMix or OCR, is a website dedicated to reviving computer and video game music from the past and re-interpreting it with new technology and software, as well as various traditional means. ... Voices of the Lifestream is an unofficial tribute album released by OverClocked ReMix as a tribute to Nobuo Uematsus score for the popular video game, Final Fantasy VII. The album was released on September 14, 2007 to coincide with the 10th anniversary of Final Fantasy VII.[2] Since its... This article is about the genre. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... This article is about Western art music from 1000 AD to the present. ... Electronica refers to a wide range of contemporary electronic music designed for a wide range of uses, including foreground listening, some forms of dancing, and background music for other activities; but unlike electronic dance music, is not specifically focused on the dance floor. ...


Reception

Final Fantasy VII was both a critical and commercial success, and set several sales records. Within three days of its January 1997 release in Japan, the game had sold 2.3 million copies. This popularity inspired thousands of retailers in North America to break street dates in September to meet public demand for the title.[88] In the game's debut weekend in North America, it sold 330,000 copies,[89] and had reached sales of 500,000 units in less than three weeks.[90] The momentum built in the game's opening weeks continued for several months; Sony announced that the game had sold one million copies on the continent by early December,[91] prompting one business analyst to comment that "Sony redefined the role-playing game (RPG) category and expanded the conventional audience with the launch of Final Fantasy VII".[91] This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Although Square's announcement that Final Fantasy VII would be produced for Sony rather than Nintendo and that it would not be based on the Final Fantasy SGI demo was initially met with discontent among gamers,[60][61] the game continues to maintain a strong following. It placed second in the "Top 100 Favorite Games of All Time" poll by Japanese magazine Famitsu during March 2006,[92] while users of the video game website GameFAQs voted Final Fantasy VII as the "Best Game Ever"[93] in November 2005, a little more than one year after it won the site's "Best. Game. Ever." tournament in 2004.[94] The great review scores and high rankings on multiple best game lists have increased the demand for Final Fantasy VII to the point where the game sells for more than the initial retail price. Used copies sell for more than $60.[95] Cover art for Issue 1 of Famitsū magazine, June 1986, then known as Famicom Tsūshin Famitsū abbreviated ファミ Fami) is a Japanese video game magazine published by Enterbrain, Inc. ... GameFAQs is a website that hosts FAQs and walkthroughs for video games. ...


Critical response

The game received extremely favorable reviews from many well-known gaming publications. GameFan called it "quite possibly the greatest game ever made", while GameSpot commented that "never before have technology, playability, and narrative combined as well as in Final Fantasy VII", expressing particular favor toward the game's graphics, audio and story. The UK-based publication Edge gave the game a 9/10,[96] and Electronic Gaming Monthly granted a 9.5/10, claiming that "No other RPG can pull off a cinematic experience like Final Fantasy VII".[6] At the time of release, multimedia website IGN insisted that Final Fantasy VII's "graphics are light years beyond anything ever seen on the PlayStation", held that its plot "is deep … and epic", and regarded its battle system as its strongest point.[4] One RPGamer staff reviewer praised the game's soundtrack "both in variety and sheer volume", suggesting that "Uematsu has done his work exceptionally well" and "is perhaps at his best here".[97] Diehard GameFan magazine (later known simply as GameFan magazine) was a publication started by Dave Halverson in 1992 that provided coverage of domestic and import video games. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Edge is a multi-format computer and video game magazine published by Future Publishing in the United Kingdom. ... Electronic Gaming Monthly (often abbreviated to EGM) is an American video game magazine. ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... RPGamer is a website which reviews, previews, and reports on various games in the Role Playing Game genre. ...


Final Fantasy VII has received negative criticism as well. GameSpy rated it seventh on their "25 Most Overrated Games" list in September 2003, saying, "Most FF aficionados will tell you that VII, while very good, is hardly the best game in the series", two of the reviewers placing both Final Fantasy VIII and Final Fantasy X above it.[98] While giving the game an overall 5/5, Official U.S. PlayStation Magazine questioned the game's highly linear progression,[99] as did GameSpot.[5] OPM considered the game's translation "a bit muddy, causing unnecessary confusion and clouding the fine story", sentiments echoed by one member of RPGamer's staff who suggested that "[the game] is far from perfect", citing its translation as "packed with typos and other errors which further obscure what is already a very confusing plot".[72] GamePro also considered the Japanese-to-English translation a significant weakness in the game,[77] and IGN regarded the option to use only three characters at a time as "the game's only shortcoming".[4] Overall, the game has earned a 92% universal approval rating from critics on Metacritic and Game Rankings.[100][101] GameSpy, also known as GameSpy Industries, is a division of IGN Entertainment, which operates a network of game Web sites and provides online video game-related services and software. ... Final Fantasy VIII ) is a console and computer role-playing game developed and published by Square Co. ... Final Fantasy X ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix), and the tenth installment in the Final Fantasy video game series; it was released in 2001, and is the first numbered Final Fantasy game for the Sony PlayStation 2 video game console. ... Official PlayStation Magazine (often abbreviated to OPM) is an international video game magazine published by Ziff Davis Media focusing on PlayStation culture, including gaming on the original PlayStation, the PlayStation 2, the PlayStation 3, and the PlayStation Portable. ... GamePro is an American video game magazine published monthly. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Metacritic is a website that collates reviews of music albums, games, movies, TV shows, DVDs and books. ... Game Rankings is a website which keeps track of video game reviews from other sites, and combines them to present an average rating for each game. ...


The game has also been the subject of criticism from parents concerned with violence in video games, particularly in the wake of the Columbine High School massacre in 1999. Following the event, several parents of children murdered in the massacre filed a US$5 billion lawsuit against companies that published and developed video and computer games. Among the co-defendants were Eidos Interactive, publisher of the PC version of the game, with Final Fantasy VII cited as their offending contribution.[102][103] The Columbine High School massacre occurred on Tuesday, April 20, 1999, at Columbine High School in unincorporated Jefferson County, Colorado (the CDP of Columbine) near Denver and Littleton. ... Eidos Interactive is a publisher of video and computer games with its parent company based in England. ...


Legacy

A battle against a dragon in the unofficial Famicom version
A battle against a dragon in the unofficial Famicom version

Final Fantasy VII is regarded as one of the most influential titles in the history of video games. It is credited with allowing console RPGs to find a place in markets outside Japan, and remains arguably the most popular title in the Final Fantasy series.[8][9] In January 2005, it was selected by Electronic Gaming Monthly as 6th on their list of "the 10 most important games … that helped redefine the industry since … 1989". Citing its "beautiful cut-scenes and a deep, introspective narrative", they claimed that "Square’s game was … the first RPG to surpass, instead of copy, movie-like storytelling."[104] As well, in late 2007, Dengeki PlayStation named Final Fantasy VII as the best story, best RPG, and best overall game in their retrospective awards feature about the original PlayStation.[105] Dengeki PlayStation April 2007 issue. ... For other uses, see PlayStation (disambiguation). ...


The game's popularity and open-ended nature also led the director and writer to establish a plot-related connection between Final Fantasy VII and Final Fantasy X, another popular Final Fantasy title.[71] It has also inspired an unofficial version for the Nintendo Famicom by Chinese company Shenzhen Nanjing Technology.[106] This port features the entire Final Fantasy VII game, sans a number of side quests, scaled back to 2D.[106] Final Fantasy X ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix), and the tenth installment in the Final Fantasy video game series; it was released in 2001, and is the first numbered Final Fantasy game for the Sony PlayStation 2 video game console. ... “NES” redirects here. ...


The game's legacy includes the acceptance and standard inclusion of full motion video sequences in RPGs, as well as significant advancement in computer graphics. These developments would allow series creator Hironobu Sakaguchi to begin production of the first Final Fantasy film, Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within.[107] The game also introduced settings dominantly suffused with modern-to-advanced technology into the Final Fantasy series, a theme continued by Final Fantasy VIII and The Spirits Within.[18][19][108] Rereleases of Square games in Japan with bonus features would occur frequently after the release of Final Fantasy VII International. Later titles that would receive this treatment include Final Fantasy X,[109] Final Fantasy X-2,[110] Kingdom Hearts (as "Final Mix"),[111] Kingdom Hearts II (as "Final Mix+"),[112] and Final Fantasy XII International Zodiac Job System. Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within is a science fiction movie by Hironobu Sakaguchi, the creator of the Final Fantasy series of video games. ... It has been suggested that Characters of Final Fantasy X-2 be merged into this article or section. ...


Related media and merchandise

Compilation of Final Fantasy VII
Image File history File links Emblem-important. ...


Further information: Compilation of Final Fantasy VII

Compilation of Final Fantasy VII is the formal title for a series of games and animated features developed by Square Enix based in the world and continuity of Final Fantasy VII. Spearheaded by Tetsuya Nomura and Yoshinori Kitase,[113][114][115] the series consists of several titles across various platforms, all of which are extensions of the Final Fantasy VII story. Dirge of Cerebus: Final Fantasy VII is an upcoming Japanese console video game developed by Square Enix for the Sony PlayStation 2. ... Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII has been described as an Action RPG. It is the fourth title in the Compilation of Final Fantasy VII, which also includes the CGI movie Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children, and the games Dirge of Cerberus: Final Fantasy VII and Before Crisis: Final Fantasy VII... Final Fantasy VII Advent Children[1] ) is a 2005 computer-animated film directed by Tetsuya Nomura, co-directed by Takeshi Nozue, written by Kazushige Nojima and based on the highly successful 1997 console role-playing game Final Fantasy VII. The film is set two years after Final Fantasy VII and... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Final Fantasy VII. (Discuss) Official series logo Compilation of Final Fantasy VII is the formal title for a series of games and films developed in 2004 and 2005 by Japanese console developer Square Enix. ...

Final Fantasy VII: Snowboarding: comparison of the PlayStation (left) and mobile versions.
Final Fantasy VII: Snowboarding: comparison of the PlayStation (left) and mobile versions.

Though not under the Compilation label, two novellas set within Final Fantasy VII's continuity have been produced, while a third Final Fantasy VII mobile game has also been developed. The first of the two novellas is Maiden who Travels the Planet. It follows Aeris' journey in the Lifestream following her death at the hands of Sephiroth, taking place concurrently with the second half of Final Fantasy VII.[116] The second novella, On the Way to a Smile, is a 3 part story based on the events that immediately followed the end of the game, with one part narrated from Tifa's perspective, one narrated from Barret's perspective, and the other narrated from that of a boy named "Denzel", orphaned after Shinra crushed Sector 7.[117] Finally, Final Fantasy VII Snowboarding, released in North America in 2005, is a mobile port of the snowboarding minigame featured in the original game.[118] The game is playable on the LG VX8000, LG VX8100, Audiovox 8940 and Samsung A890 mobile phone and contains different tracks than the original minigame. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see PlayStation (disambiguation). ... Aerith Gainsborough )—known as Aeris Gainsborough in the English translations of Final Fantasy VII and Final Fantasy Tactics—is a female protagonist in SquareSofts (now Square Enix) role-playing game Final Fantasy VII. In Final Fantasy VII, Aeris is a 22-year-old flower girl who joins AVALANCHE. As... Final Fantasy VII Advent Children[1] ) is a 2005 computer-animated film directed by Tetsuya Nomura, co-directed by Takeshi Nozue, written by Kazushige Nojima and based on the highly successful 1997 console role-playing game Final Fantasy VII. The film is set two years after Final Fantasy VII and... 2005 2005 in games 2004 in video gaming 2006 in video gaming Notable events of 2005 in video gaming. ... In computer science, porting is the process of adapting software so that an executable program can be created for a computing environment that is different from the one for which it was originally designed (e. ... In Fantastic Dizzy, the player has to complete a sliding puzzle to get an extra life. ...


Some speculate that the Compilation will also include an enhanced remake of the original Final Fantasy VII for the PlayStation 3. This speculation was sparked at the 2005 Electronic Entertainment Expo by the release of a Final Fantasy VII technology demo featuring the opening sequence of Final Fantasy VII recreated using the PlayStation 3's graphical capabilities.[119][120][121] The demo was created by Yoshinori Kitase's team with help from Koji Sugimoto, the main programmer for Final Fantasy X, as well as Motomu Toriyama, and was completed in one and a half months to Kitase's surprise and satisfaction, who nevertheless noted that it does not use the PlayStation 3's full capacities and could have been of even higher quality if more time had been given.[122] In the video game subculture, an enhanced remake (also called updated classics) is an updated version of a video or computer game that was originally developed for a less advanced system. ... A technology demo is a prototype, rough example or an otherwise incomplete version of a product, put together with the primary purpose of showcasing the idea, performance, method or the features of the product. ... Final Fantasy X ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix), and the tenth installment in the Final Fantasy video game series; it was released in 2001, and is the first numbered Final Fantasy game for the Sony PlayStation 2 video game console. ... Motomu Toriyama is video game director for the Square Enix corporation. ...


Although Yōichi Wada explained that the presentation was intended only for technological demonstration purposes[121]—claims echoed by Kitase in an interview in Final Fantasy VII Ultimania Ω[119]—the June 2006 issue of Electronic Gaming Monthly stated that the video was actually a "sneak peak at a next-gen revival" of Final Fantasy VII.[123] An official statement from Square Enix later debunked this claim, reiterating that the company had not announced such a project.[124][125] Further fueling the rumors, Kaz Hirai said at the Final Fantasy VII 10th Anniversary Gallery in Tokyo: "Congratulations on 10 fantastic years! The best is yet to come".[126] In an interview conducted with Square-Enix's Hajime Tabata, he states that the 'Compilation of Final Fantasy VII' series has not been completed with the release of the 'Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII' game for the Sony PSP and that "the Compilation's finale will take some other form".[127]

Cans of "Final Fantasy VII Potion" are printed with CG images of the game's main characters.

At the Square Enix Party event of May 2007, Suntory unveiled a drink named "Final Fantasy VII Potion", produced to celebrate Final Fantasy VII's 10th anniversary. The drink was a limited edition product.[128] Kotaku staff members have compared its taste to Dekavita C, a Suntory citrus drink, and much better than the "Final Fantasy XII Potion".[129]
Suntory Limited ) is a Japanese brewing and distilling company. ... Though each Final Fantasy story is independent, many themes and elements of gameplay recur throughout the series. ... Kotaku is a blog which focuses on video games. ... Final Fantasy XII ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square Enix for the Sony PlayStation 2 video game console, and the twelfth installment in the Final Fantasy video game series. ...


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Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Eidos Interactive is a publisher of video and computer games with its parent company based in England. ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameTrailers (GT) is a media website that specializes in video game related content. ... ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... SQUARE ENIX (Japanese: スクウェア・エニックス) is a Japanese producer of popular video games and manga. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameFAQs is a website that hosts FAQs and walkthroughs for video games. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... RPGamer is a website which reviews, previews, and reports on various games in the Role Playing Game genre. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... RPGamer is a website which reviews, previews, and reports on various games in the Role Playing Game genre. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Business Wire logo == THIS POSTING MAY BE IN VIOLATION AND MAY NEED TO BE EDITED. IT READS AS AN ADVETISIMENT AND ITS CLAIMS HAVE NOT BEEN VERIFIED. == Business Wire is a company that disseminates full-text news releases from thousands of companies and organizations worldwide to news media, financial markets... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Business Wire logo == THIS POSTING MAY BE IN VIOLATION AND MAY NEED TO BE EDITED. IT READS AS AN ADVETISIMENT AND ITS CLAIMS HAVE NOT BEEN VERIFIED. == Business Wire is a company that disseminates full-text news releases from thousands of companies and organizations worldwide to news media, financial markets... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... RPGFan is a website devoted to electronic role-playing games, including console games and PC games, both domestic and imported. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... RPGFan is a website devoted to electronic role-playing games, including console games and PC games, both domestic and imported. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... RPGFan is a website devoted to electronic role-playing games, including console games and PC games, both domestic and imported. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... RPGFan is a website devoted to electronic role-playing games, including console games and PC games, both domestic and imported. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... RPGFan is a website devoted to electronic role-playing games, including console games and PC games, both domestic and imported. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Business Wire logo == THIS POSTING MAY BE IN VIOLATION AND MAY NEED TO BE EDITED. IT READS AS AN ADVETISIMENT AND ITS CLAIMS HAVE NOT BEEN VERIFIED. == Business Wire is a company that disseminates full-text news releases from thousands of companies and organizations worldwide to news media, financial markets... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Business Wire logo == THIS POSTING MAY BE IN VIOLATION AND MAY NEED TO BE EDITED. IT READS AS AN ADVETISIMENT AND ITS CLAIMS HAVE NOT BEEN VERIFIED. == Business Wire is a company that disseminates full-text news releases from thousands of companies and organizations worldwide to news media, financial markets... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Business Wire logo == THIS POSTING MAY BE IN VIOLATION AND MAY NEED TO BE EDITED. IT READS AS AN ADVETISIMENT AND ITS CLAIMS HAVE NOT BEEN VERIFIED. == Business Wire is a company that disseminates full-text news releases from thousands of companies and organizations worldwide to news media, financial markets... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Business Wire logo == THIS POSTING MAY BE IN VIOLATION AND MAY NEED TO BE EDITED. IT READS AS AN ADVETISIMENT AND ITS CLAIMS HAVE NOT BEEN VERIFIED. == Business Wire is a company that disseminates full-text news releases from thousands of companies and organizations worldwide to news media, financial markets... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Star Trek: The Next Generation is a science fiction television series set in the Star Trek universe created by Gene Roddenberry. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameFAQs is a website that hosts FAQs and walkthroughs for video games. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameFAQs is a website that hosts FAQs and walkthroughs for video games. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... RPGamer is a website which reviews, previews, and reports on various games in the Role Playing Game genre. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpy, also known as GameSpy Industries, is a division of IGN Entertainment, which operates a network of game Web sites and provides online video game-related services and software. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Metacritic is a website that collates reviews of music albums, games, movies, TV shows, DVDs and books. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Game Rankings is a website which keeps track of video game reviews from other sites, and combines them to present an average rating for each game. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Headlines of the Evening Standard on the day of London bombing on July 7, 2005, in Waterloo Station The Evening Standard is a British tabloid newspaper published and sold in London and surrounding areas of southeast England. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Joystiq is a video gaming website founded in June 2004 that has since become one of the most successful sites within the Weblogs, Inc. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... RPGamer is a website which reviews, previews, and reports on various games in the Role Playing Game genre. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Cover art for Issue 1 of FamitsÅ« magazine, June 1986, then known as Famicom TsÅ«shin FamitsÅ« abbreviated ファミ Fami) is a Japanese video game magazine published by Enterbrain, Inc. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... RPGamer is a website which reviews, previews, and reports on various games in the Role Playing Game genre. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 160th day of the year (161st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Kotaku is a blog which focuses on video games. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Yahoo redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Kotaku is a blog which focuses on video games. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Wikia (no official pronunciation[2]; originally Wikicities) is a selective wiki hosting service (or wiki farm) operated by Wikia, Inc. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Final Fantasy VII. (Discuss) Official series logo Compilation of Final Fantasy VII is the formal title for a series of games and films developed in 2004 and 2005 by Japanese console developer Square Enix. ... Final Fantasy VII Advent Children[1] ) is a 2005 computer-animated film directed by Tetsuya Nomura, co-directed by Takeshi Nozue, written by Kazushige Nojima and based on the highly successful 1997 console role-playing game Final Fantasy VII. The film is set two years after Final Fantasy VII and... Dirge of Cerebus: Final Fantasy VII is an upcoming Japanese console video game developed by Square Enix for the Sony PlayStation 2. ... Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII has been described as an Action RPG. It is the fourth title in the Compilation of Final Fantasy VII, which also includes the CGI movie Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children, and the games Dirge of Cerberus: Final Fantasy VII and Before Crisis: Final Fantasy VII... Gaia is the fictional world in the 1997 console role-playing game Final Fantasy VII. The games setting follows in the footsteps of Final Fantasy VI by presenting a world with considerably more advanced technology than the first five games in the series. ... The music of the video game Final Fantasy VII was written by regular series composer Nobuo Uematsu. ... Cloud Strife ) is the main protagonist in Squares (now Square Enix) role-playing game Final Fantasy VII and several of its sequels and spin-offs. ... Sephiroth ) is a fictional character and recurring villain in Squares (now Square Enix) role-playing game, Final Fantasy VII. He was designed by character designer Tetsuya Nomura and is characterized as a tall man with long silver hair. ... Vincent Valentine ) is a secret playable character in the PlayStation RPG Final Fantasy VII and is in its CGI film sequel Final Fantasy VII Advent Children. ... Aerith Gainsborough )—known as Aeris Gainsborough in the English translations of Final Fantasy VII and Final Fantasy Tactics—is a female protagonist in SquareSofts (now Square Enix) role-playing game Final Fantasy VII. In Final Fantasy VII, Aeris is a 22-year-old flower girl who joins AVALANCHE. As... Tifa Lockhart ), is a female protagonist from Squaresofts blockbuster RPG, Final Fantasy VII designed by Tetsuya Nomura. ... Zack Fair ) is a non-player character from the role-playing game Final Fantasy VII and the protagonist of both its prequels, Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII and the OVA Last Order: Final Fantasy VII. Though he appears only in flashback sequences in the original game, he is portrayed as... This article is about the Final Fantasy franchise. ... Final Fantasy ) is a console role-playing game developed and published in Japan by Square (now Square Enix) in 1987 and published in North America by Nintendo of America in 1990, and is the inaugural game in Squares flagship Final Fantasy series. ... Final Fantasy II on the SNES, see Final Fantasy IV Foundation for a Free Information Infrastructure Final Fantasy II ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) in 1988 for the Nintendo Family Computer (Famicom, known internationally as the Nintendo Entertainment System) as a... It has been suggested that Characters of Final Fantasy III be merged into this article or section. ... Final Fantasy IV ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) in 1991 as a part of the Final Fantasy video game series. ... “FF5” redirects here. ... Final Fantasy VI ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) in 1994 as a part of the Final Fantasy series. ... Final Fantasy VIII ) is a console and computer role-playing game developed and published by Square Co. ... Final Fantasy IX ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix), and the ninth installment in the Final Fantasy video game series. ... Final Fantasy X ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix), and the tenth installment in the Final Fantasy video game series; it was released in 2001, and is the first numbered Final Fantasy game for the Sony PlayStation 2 video game console. ... Final Fantasy XI ), also known as Final Fantasy XI: Online, is a massively multiplayer online role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) as a part of the Final Fantasy video game series. ... Final Fantasy XII ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square Enix for the Sony PlayStation 2 video game console, and the twelfth installment in the Final Fantasy video game series. ... Final Fantasy XIII ) is an upcoming console role-playing game developed and published by Square Enix exclusively for the Sony PlayStation 3 as a part of the Final Fantasy video game series. ... Final Fantasy ) is a popular series of console role playing games developed and published by Square Enix (originally Square). ... Final Fantasy ) is a popular series of console role playing games developed and published by Square Enix (originally Square). ... Final Fantasy ) is a popular series of console role playing games developed and published by Square Enix (originally Square). ... Final Fantasy ) is a popular series of console role playing games developed and published by Square Enix (originally Square). ... Final Fantasy ) is a popular series of console role playing games developed and published by Square Enix (originally Square). ... Though each Final Fantasy story is independent, many themes and elements of gameplay recur throughout the series. ... Final Fantasy ) is a video game franchise by Square Enix that began in 1987 as an eponymous console role-playing game developed by Square. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Final Fantasy VII: The Dark Cloud @ Abandonia Reloaded (592 words)
When the adventure of Final Fantasy 7 had finished, some people wanted more; like with most RPG's it never finishes and you wonder ‘gee I wonder what would happen after the game.
Now if you have not played Final Fantasy 7 or are still playing it, you may want to skip this paragraph as I break down the story for the ones who have beat it.
Still this was a very interesting game to play and if you are a fan of the Final Fantasy 7 series definitely try it out and you will probably enjoy it.
Game Music / FINAL FANTASY VII ADVENT CHILDREN Original Soundtrack (773 words)
Finally, there's the 2 numbers I heard on the radio.
You don't even have to be a fan of Final Fantasy.
Interesting piece of Final Fantasy, with another view to the melodies.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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