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Encyclopedia > Final Fantasy
A generic Final Fantasy logo. This typeface was first used in Japan with Final Fantasy IV, and in North America and Europe with Final Fantasy VII.
A generic Final Fantasy logo. This typeface was first used in Japan with Final Fantasy IV, and in North America and Europe with Final Fantasy VII.

Final Fantasy (ファイナルファンタジー Fainaru Fantajī?) is a media franchise created by Hironobu Sakaguchi and owned by Square Enix that includes video games, motion pictures, and other merchandise. The series began in 1987 as an eponymous console role-playing game (RPG) developed by Square, spawning a video game series that became the central focus of the franchise.[1][2] The franchise has since branched out into other genres and platforms, such as tactical RPGs,[3] portable games, a massively multiplayer online role-playing game, and games for mobile phones. As of March 2007, there are twenty-eight games in the franchise—including twelve numbered games and numerous spin-off titles.[4] The series has spurred the release of three animated productions, two full-length CGI films, and several printed adaptations. Image File history File links Mergefrom. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Final Fantasy ) is a console role-playing game developed and published in Japan by Square (now Square Enix) in 1987 and published in North America by Nintendo of America in 1990, and is the inaugural game in Squares flagship Final Fantasy series. ... Final Fantasy is a series of computer and console role-playing games. ... Image File history File links Final_Fantasy_wordmark. ... Image File history File links Final_Fantasy_wordmark. ... For other uses, see Logo (disambiguation). ... Final Fantasy IV ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) in 1991 as a part of the Final Fantasy series. ... North American redirects here. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Final Fantasy VII ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square, and the seventh installment in the Final Fantasy series. ... i eat poop alot A media franchise is an intellectual property involving the characters, setting, and trademarks of an original work of media (usually a work of fiction), such as a film, a work of literature, a television program, or a video game. ... Hironobu Sakaguchi ) (born November 25, 1962) is a Japanese game designer, game director and game producer. ... SQUARE ENIX (Japanese: スクウェア・エニックス) is a Japanese producer of popular video games and manga. ... Computer and video games redirects here. ... For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as part of... Final Fantasy ) is a console role-playing game developed and published in Japan by Square (now Square Enix) in 1987 and published in North America by Nintendo of America in 1990, and is the inaugural game in Squares flagship Final Fantasy series. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A video game developer is a software developer (a business or an individual) that creates video games. ... Square Company, Limited ) was a Japanese video game company founded in September of 1983 by Masafumi Miyamoto and Hironobu Sakaguchi. ... A tactical role-playing game (usually simply called tactical RPG, sometimes referred to as strategy role-playing game or SRPG) is a type of computer role-playing game (CRPG) in which the focus of the gameplay is on making tactical decisions in battles. ... A handheld game console is a lightweight, portable electronic machine for playing video games. ... Players interacting in Ultima Online, a classic MMORPG. Massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG) is a genre of online computer role-playing games (CRPGs) in which a large number of players interact with one another in a virtual world. ... Animé redirects here. ... Computer-generated imagery[1] (also known as CGI) is the application of the field of computer graphics or, more specifically, 3D computer graphics to special effects in films, television programs, commercials, simulators and simulation generally, and printed media. ...


Most Final Fantasy installments are independent stories (the numbers after the title refers more to volumes than sequels); however, they feature common elements that define the franchise. Such elements include recurring creatures, character names, airships and character classes. The series has popularized many features that are now widely used in console RPGs, and it is well known for its visuals, music, and innovation,[5][6] such as the inclusion of full motion videos, photo-realistic character models, and orchestrated music by Nobuo Uematsu. The series have been commercially and critically successful; it is the fourth-best-selling video game franchise,[1] with more than 80 million units sold as of December 2007.[7] Many individual titles in series have garnered extra attention and their own positive reception. In addition, the series was awarded a star on the Walk of Game in 2006.[8] Screenshot of an FMV from Final Fantasy VIII using Bink Video. ... This article is about the artistic movement. ... Nobuo Uematsu , born March 21, 1959) is a Japanese composer of video game music, and one of the most well-known, prolific, and versatile in the field. ... This is a list of video games that have sold one million copies or more, including the top ten best-selling franchises. ... The Walk of Game is an area of the Metreon complex building in San Francisco, California that honors great video game achievements. ...

Contents

Games

Further information: List of Final Fantasy media

The first installment of the series premiered in Japan on December 18, 1987. Each subsequent title was numbered and given a unique story. Since the original release, many Final Fantasy games have been localized for markets in North America, Europe, and Australia, on numerous video game consoles, IBM PC compatible computers, and mobile phones. Future installments will appear on seventh generation video game consoles; two upcoming titles for the PlayStation 3 include Final Fantasy XIII and Final Fantasy Versus XIII. As of March 2007, there are 28 games in the franchise.[4] This number includes the main installments from Final Fantasy to Final Fantasy XII, as well as direct sequels and spin-offs. Many of the older titles have been re-released on multiple platforms. Final Fantasy ) is a popular series of console role playing games developed and published by Square Enix (originally Square). ... Final Fantasy ) is a console role-playing game developed and published in Japan by Square (now Square Enix) in 1987 and published in North America by Nintendo of America in 1990, and is the inaugural game in Squares flagship Final Fantasy series. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 1987. ... Software localization is a process of translating software user interfaces from one language to another and adapting it to suit a foreign culture. ... North American redirects here. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Game console redirects here. ... IBM PC compatible computers are those generally similar to the original IBM PC, XT, and AT. Such computers used to be referred to as PC clones, or IBM clones since they almost exactly duplicated all the significant features of the PC, XT, or AT internal design, facilitated by various manufacturers... In the history of computer and video games, the seventh generation began on November 21, 2004 with the North American release of the Nintendo DS, followed by the PlayStation Portable on December 12, 2004. ... The PlayStation 3 , trademarked PLAYSTATION®3,[3] commonly abbreviated PS3) is the third home video game console produced by Sony Computer Entertainment; successor to the PlayStation 2. ... Final Fantasy XIII ) is an upcoming console role-playing game developed and published by Square Enix exclusively for the Sony PlayStation 3 as a part of the Final Fantasy video game series. ... Final Fantasy Versus XIII ) is an action role-playing game developed and published by Square Enix exclusively for the Sony PlayStation 3 video game console. ... Final Fantasy ) is a console role-playing game developed and published in Japan by Square (now Square Enix) in 1987 and published in North America by Nintendo of America in 1990, and is the inaugural game in Squares flagship Final Fantasy series. ... Final Fantasy XII ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square Enix for the Sony PlayStation 2 video game console, and the twelfth installment in the Final Fantasy video game series. ... A spin-off (or spinoff) is a new organization or entity formed by a split from a larger one such as a new company formed from a university research group. ...


Main series

Cover of the North America release of Final Fantasy for the Nintendo Entertainment System
Cover of the North America release of Final Fantasy for the Nintendo Entertainment System
  • Final Fantasy II was originally released on the Famicom in Japan in 1988.[10] The story centers on four youths who join a resistance to end the Emperor's military campaign against the world. Final Fantasy II was the first game to introduce Chocobos and Cid.[5]
  • Final Fantasy III was released on the Famicom in Japan in 1990.[11] The plot focuses on four orphaned youths who come across a crystal, which grants them power and instructs them to restore balance to the world. It was the first game to implement a Job System, summoning and introduce Moogles.[5]
  • Final Fantasy V was released on the Super Famicom in Japan in 1992.[15] The story focuses on a wanderer and his allies as they prevent the resurgence of Exdeath. It features an expanded version of the Job System from Final Fantasy III.
  • Final Fantasy VI was released on the Super Nintendo Entertainment System in 1994,[16] but it was released in North America under the title Final Fantasy III.[16] The plot centers on a group of rebels as they attempt to overthrow an imperial dictatorship. It has more battle customization options than its predecessors, as well as the largest playable cast in the series.
  • Final Fantasy VII was released on the PlayStation in 1997 and was the first title to be officially released in Europe.[17] The story centers on a group of adventurers as they battle a powerful corporation. Final Fantasy VII was the first game in the series to use 3D computer graphics, which feature fully polygonal characters on pre-rendered backgrounds. This is the first Final Fantasy to have the same number designation in America and Japan since the original game was released.
  • Final Fantasy VIII was released on the PlayStation in 1999.[18] The plot focuses on a group of young mercenaries who seek to prevent a sorceress from manipulating an international war. It was the first game in the series to consistently use realistically proportioned characters, and feature a vocal piece as its theme music.
  • Final Fantasy IX was released on the PlayStation in 2000.[19] The story begins with the protagonists attempting to stop a war sparked by an ambitious queen. It returned to the series' roots by revisiting a more traditional Final Fantasy setting.
  • Final Fantasy X was released on the PlayStation 2 in 2001.[20] The story focuses on the protagonists trying to defeat a rampaging force known as Sin. Final Fantasy X introduced fully three-dimensional areas and voice acting to the series, and it was the first to spawn a direct sequel (Final Fantasy X-2).
  • Final Fantasy XI was released on the PlayStation 2 and PC in 2002[21], and later on the Xbox 360. The first MMORPG in the series, Final Fantasy XI is set in Vana'diel, where players can experience hundreds of quests and stories. It is also the first game in the series to feature real-time battles instead of random encounters.
  • Final Fantasy XII was released for the PlayStation 2 in 2006.[22] The game takes place in Ivalice, where the empires of Archadia and Rozarria are waging an endless war. It features a real-time battle system similar to Final Fantasy XI, a "gambit" system that automatically controls the actions of characters, and a "license board" that determines which abilities and equipment the character can use.

Final Fantasy I US release box art This is the cover art for a video or computer game. ... Final Fantasy I US release box art This is the cover art for a video or computer game. ... Final Fantasy ) is a console role-playing game developed and published in Japan by Square (now Square Enix) in 1987 and published in North America by Nintendo of America in 1990, and is the inaugural game in Squares flagship Final Fantasy series. ... “NES” redirects here. ... Final Fantasy ) is a console role-playing game developed and published in Japan by Square (now Square Enix) in 1987 and published in North America by Nintendo of America in 1990, and is the inaugural game in Squares flagship Final Fantasy series. ... “NES” redirects here. ... North American redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Final Fantasy II on the SNES, see Final Fantasy IV Foundation for a Free Information Infrastructure Final Fantasy II ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) in 1988 for the Nintendo Family Computer (Famicom, known internationally as the Nintendo Entertainment System) as a... “NES” redirects here. ... An example of a chocobo taken from a screenshot of Final Fantasy X-2. ... It has been suggested that Characters of Final Fantasy III be merged into this article or section. ... Though each Final Fantasy story is independent, many themes and elements of gameplay recur throughout the series. ... Final Fantasy IV ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) in 1991 as a part of the Final Fantasy series. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... “FF5” redirects here. ... Final Fantasy VI ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) in 1994 as a part of the Final Fantasy series. ... Final Fantasy VII ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square, and the seventh installment in the Final Fantasy series. ... For other uses, see PlayStation (disambiguation). ... This article is about process of creating 3D computer graphics. ... Polygons are used in computer graphics to compose images that are three-dimensional in appearance. ... Final Fantasy VIII ) is a console and computer role-playing game developed and published by Square Co. ... Final Fantasy IX ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix), and the ninth installment in the Final Fantasy video game series. ... Final Fantasy X ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix), and the tenth installment in the Final Fantasy video game series; it was released in 2001, and is the first numbered Final Fantasy game for the Sony PlayStation 2 video game console. ... PS2 redirects here. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... It has been suggested that Characters of Final Fantasy X-2 be merged into this article or section. ... Final Fantasy XI ), also known as Final Fantasy XI: Online, is a massively multiplayer online role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) as a part of the Final Fantasy video game series. ... A stylised illustration of a personal computer A personal computer (PC) is a computer whose original sales price, size, and capabilities make it useful for individuals, intended to be operated directly by an end user, with no intervening computer operator. ... It has been suggested that Xbox 360 Elite be merged into this article or section. ... An image from World of Warcraft, one of the largest commercial MMORPGs as of 2004, based on active subscriptions. ... A random encounter is a feature commonly used in hack and slash role-playing games and computer and video games whereby encounters with non-player character (NPC) enemies or other dangers occur sporadically and at random. ... Final Fantasy XII ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square Enix for the Sony PlayStation 2 video game console, and the twelfth installment in the Final Fantasy video game series. ... Ivalice ) is a fictional location in the Final Fantasy XII, Final Fantasy Tactics and Vagrant Story universes. ... Final Fantasy XIII ) is an upcoming console role-playing game developed and published by Square Enix exclusively for the Sony PlayStation 3 as a part of the Final Fantasy video game series. ... The PlayStation 3 , trademarked PLAYSTATION®3,[3] commonly abbreviated PS3) is the third home video game console produced by Sony Computer Entertainment; successor to the PlayStation 2. ... Fabula Nova Crystallis Final Fantasy XIII ) is the collective name of a series of games made under the Final Fantasy XIII label by Square Enix Co. ...

Direct sequels and spin-offs

See also: Category: Final Fantasy spin-offs

Final Fantasy has spawned numerous spin-offs and compilations. Three Square games were released in North America with their titles changed to include "Final Fantasy": The Final Fantasy Legend and its two sequels. Final Fantasy Adventure is a spin-off to the Final Fantasy series and spawned the Mana series.[23] Final Fantasy Mystic Quest was developed for a United States audience, and Final Fantasy Tactics featured many references and themes found in previous Final Fantasy games. In 2003, the video game series' first direct sequel, Final Fantasy X-2, was released.[24] Square Enix has released numerous games featuring Chocobos, and the Kingdom Hearts series includes characters and themes from Final Fantasy.[25] Vagrant Story, another Square game, is set in Ivalice, the same world featured in Final Fantasy Tactics and Final Fantasy XII.[26] Three Final Fantasy compilations—Compilation of Final Fantasy VII, Ivalice Alliance, and Fabula Nova Crystallis Final Fantasy XIII—share many themes. The Final Fantasy Legend, known as Makai Toushi SaGa in Japan (魔界塔士Sa・Ga; roughly translated as Saga: Heroes of the Infernal Tower), is a Game Boy video game. ... Final Fantasy Adventure (Seiken Densetsu: Final Fantasy Gaiden (聖剣伝説 ~ファイナルファンタジー外伝~) in Japan, and Mystic Quest in Europe), released in 1991, was the first game in the Seiken Densetsu series. ... Artwork of the Mana Tree, from Children of Mana The Mana series, known in Japan as Seiken Densetsu lit. ... Final Fantasy Mystic Quest , released as Final Fantasy USA Mystic Quest in Japan) is a role-playing game for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System game console. ... Final Fantasy Tactics ) is a tactical role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) for the Sony PlayStation video game console. ... An example of a chocobo taken from a screenshot of Final Fantasy X-2. ... The logo of Kingdom Hearts, the first game in the series. ... Vagrant Story ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square Co. ... Ivalice ) is a fictional location in the Final Fantasy XII, Final Fantasy Tactics and Vagrant Story universes. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Final Fantasy VII. (Discuss) Official series logo Compilation of Final Fantasy VII is the formal title for a series of games and films developed in 2004 and 2005 by Japanese console developer Square Enix. ... Ivalice ) is a fictional location in the Final Fantasy XII, Final Fantasy Tactics and Vagrant Story universes. ... Fabula Nova Crystallis Final Fantasy XIII ) is the collective name of a series of games made under the Final Fantasy XIII label by Square Enix Co. ...


Overview

Common elements

Although most Final Fantasy installments are independent, many themes and elements of gameplay recur throughout the series. The concept of summoning legendary creatures to aid in battle has persisted since Final Fantasy III; common summons include Shiva, Ifrit, and Bahamut.[5] Recurring creatures include Chocobos, Moogles, Tonberries, Behemoth, Cactuars and Malboros.[27] Some spin-off titles have cameo appearances of characters from other games, and most titles feature recycled character names. For example, there has been a character named Cid in each game since Final Fantasy II;[28] however, each appearance and personality is different. Airships and character classes—specific jobs that enable unique abilities for characters—are other recurring themes.[5][27] Though each Final Fantasy story is independent, many themes and elements of gameplay recur throughout the series. ... Gameplay includes all player experiences during the interaction with game systems, especially formal games. ... It has been suggested that Characters of Final Fantasy III be merged into this article or section. ... An example of a chocobo taken from a screenshot of Final Fantasy X-2. ... Though each Final Fantasy story is independent, many themes and elements of gameplay recur throughout the series. ... In the Final Fantasy series of console role playing games by Square Enix (formerly Square), monsters are common antagonists to the playable characters, with usually no relevance to the storyline. ... Cid ) is a character who appears in all Final Fantasy series of computer and video games. ...


Gameplay

Game screens

Final Fantasy games typically have several types of screens, or modes of interaction, that are broadly categorized by function. Screens are accessed either by the player's actions or by automatic events. Such screens include: field screens, battle screens, world screens, menu screens, cutscenes, and minigames. The player normally controls the character interaction with the environment via Field, Battle, and World screens; minigames are sometimes used for this as well. A cut scene or cutscene (sometimes also referred to as a cinematic) is a sequence in a video game over which the player has no control. ... In Fantastic Dizzy, the player has to complete a sliding puzzle to get an extra life. ...


"Field screens" are enclosed and interconnected areas—towns, caves, fields, and other environments—through which the player can navigate the playable characters. Most of the character dialogue and exploration occurs on the field screens. In the first ten titles (except Final Fantasy VIII, where other characters follow the main character when you are not on the world map), players can navigate the main character, which represents the whole party, around the environment. Since Final Fantasy XI, multiple playable characters have been shown on the Field screen, and battles have been incorporated into the Field screen. Final Fantasy VIII ) is a console and computer role-playing game developed and published by Square Co. ... Final Fantasy XI ), also known as Final Fantasy XI: Online, is a massively multiplayer online role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) as a part of the Final Fantasy video game series. ...

Final Fantasy IV (SNES) world screen

"Battle screens" facilitate battles in an arena, usually with a change of scale and a background that represents where the battle is occurring. For example, a random battle in a desert will have a desert backdrop.[29] Battles are normally either plot-relevant or random encounters. In Final Fantasy XI and XII, battles screens were omitted by having battle sequences occur on the main field screen;[30][31] the change was influenced by a desire to remove random encounters.[32] Image File history File links FFIV_overworld_map. ... Image File history File links FFIV_overworld_map. ... For other uses, see Arena (disambiguation). ... A random encounter is a feature commonly used in hack and slash role-playing games and computer and video games whereby encounters with non-player character (NPC) enemies or other dangers occur sporadically and at random. ... Final Fantasy XII ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square Enix for the Sony PlayStation 2 video game console, and the twelfth installment in the Final Fantasy video game series. ...


The "World screen" is a low-scale map of the game world used to symbolize traveling great distances that would otherwise slow the plot progression. The party can often traverse this screen via airships, Chocobos, and other modes of transportation.[29] "Menu Screens" are used for character and game management; typical menu screens include items, character status, equipment, abilities, and game options.[27] This screen is usually presented in a very simple table layout. "Cutscenes" are non-interactive playbacks that provide instructions for the player or advance the plot. They can either be pre-rendered video, also known as full motion video, or they can be executed with the same engine as any of the first three modes. "Minigames" are small activities that generally serve as diversions from the story. Though each Final Fantasy story is independent, many themes and elements of gameplay recur throughout the series. ... An example of a chocobo taken from a screenshot of Final Fantasy X-2. ... A cut scene or cutscene (sometimes also referred to as a cinematic) is a sequence in a video game over which the player has no control. ... Screenshot of an FMV from Final Fantasy VIII using Bink Video. ... Final Fantasy ) is a video game franchise by Square Enix that began in 1987 as an eponymous console role-playing game developed by Square. ...

Example diagram of the Active Time Battle system used in several Final Fantasy games from its US patent application
Example diagram of the Active Time Battle system used in several Final Fantasy games from its US patent application

Battle system

Combat in the Final Fantasy series started with a simple menu-driven, turn-based battle system. Since Final Fantasy IV, the series has gradually introduced more real-time elements,[5] culminating in a full real-time system for Final Fantasy XI and Final Fantasy XII.[33][34] The traditional, turn-based battle system was used in the first three games. At the beginning of each combat round, the player chooses battle commands for all playable characters. These commands are carried out in an order determined by the "speed" statistic of the characters. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A turn-based game is a game where the game flow is partitioned into well-defined and visible parts, called turns or rounds. ...


With Final Fantasy IV, the turn-based battle system was replaced by the Active Time Battle (ATB) system. ATB was replaced by the Conditional Turn-Based (CTB) system in Final Fantasy X, and Real Time Battle systems were introduced in Final Fantasy XI. At the 2006 E3 conference, Square Enix presented a short demo of Final Fantasy XIII, in which a menu at the bottom of the screen was used for inputting battle commands; the system was barely noticed because of the cinematic nature of the battles.[35] Final Fantasy IV ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) in 1991 as a part of the Final Fantasy series. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Final Fantasy X ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix), and the tenth installment in the Final Fantasy video game series; it was released in 2001, and is the first numbered Final Fantasy game for the Sony PlayStation 2 video game console. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... E³ logo The Electronic Entertainment Expo, commonly known as E³, was an annual trade show for the computer and video games industry presented by the Entertainment Software Association. ... Final Fantasy XIII ) is an upcoming console role-playing game developed and published by Square Enix exclusively for the Sony PlayStation 3 as a part of the Final Fantasy video game series. ...


Most installments use an experience level system for character advancement, in which experience points are accumulated by killing enemies—however, defeating bosses in some titles did not provide experience points.[36][37][38] Battles also use a point-based system for casting magical spells. Since Final Fantasy III, most titles have featured a variety of "special commands", such as stealing items from enemies or performing more powerful attacks. These abilities are sometimes integrated into the job system, which has appeared in several installments.
This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In several instalments of the Final Fantasy series of role-playing games by Square Enix, classes (jobs) are roles assigned to playable characters that determine the characters proficiencies. ...


Music

Nobuo Uematsu, composer of most of the Final Fantasy soundtracks
Nobuo Uematsu, composer of most of the Final Fantasy soundtracks
Main article: Music of Final Fantasy

Nobuo Uematsu was the critically acclaimed chief music composer of the Final Fantasy series until his resignation from Square Enix in November 2004.[1] Uematsu is also involved with the rock group The Black Mages, which has released three albums of arranged Final Fantasy tunes.[39][40] Other composers who have contributed to the series include Masashi Hamauzu and Hitoshi Sakimoto.[41][42] This work is copyrighted. ... This work is copyrighted. ... Nobuo Uematsu , born March 21, 1959) is a Japanese composer of video game music, and one of the most well-known, prolific, and versatile in the field. ... The music of Final Fantasy refers to the soundtracks of the Final Fantasy series of console-based, usually plot-intensive Japanese role-playing games. ... Nobuo Uematsu , born March 21, 1959) is a Japanese composer of video game music, and one of the most well-known, prolific, and versatile in the field. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... For their eponymous first album, see The Black Mages (album). ... In music, an arrangement refers either to a rewriting of a piece of existing music with additional new material or to a fleshing-out of a compositional sketch, such as a lead sheet. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Hitoshi Sakimoto ) is a video game music composer. ...


Although each game offers a variety of music, there are some frequently reused themes. Most of the games open with a piece called "Prelude", which has evolved from a simple, 2-voice, arpeggiated theme in the early games to a complex melodic arrangement in recent installments.[5][27][29] Battle victories in the first ten installments of the series were accompanied by a victory fanfare; this theme has become one of the most recognized pieces of music in the series. The basic theme for Chocobos is rearranged in a different musical style for each installment. A piece called "Prologue" or "Final Fantasy", originally featured in Final Fantasy I, is often played during the ending credits.[5] Although leitmotifs are often used in the more character-driven installments, theme music is typically reserved for main characters and recurring plot elements.[1]
Various arpeggios as seen on a staff Notation of a chord in arpeggio In music, an arpeggio is a broken chord where the notes are played or sung in succession rather than simultaneously. ... A leitmotif (pronounced ) (also leitmotiv; lit. ...


Development

History

In the mid 1980s, Square entered the Japanese video game industry with a string of simple RPGs, racing games, and platformers for Nintendo's Famicom Disk System (FDS). In 1987, Square designer Hironobu Sakaguchi began work on a new fantasy role-playing game for the cartridge-based Famicom, inspired in part by Enix's popular Dragon Quest. As Sakaguchi planned to retire after completing the project, it was named Final Fantasy.[2][43] Despite Sakaguchi's explanation, the name of the game has also been attributed by various sources to the company's hopes that the project would solve their financial troubles.[5] Final Fantasy indeed reversed Square's lagging fortunes,[2] and it became their flagship franchise.[1] Square Company, Limited ) was a Japanese video game company founded in September of 1983 by Masafumi Miyamoto and Hironobu Sakaguchi. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Many board games can be said to be racing games, such as Snakes and Ladders, Cribbage, or Formula Dé. (see race game) There are also toys made for racing, like slot cars and radio controlled cars. ... A simple platform sequence from the game Wonder Boy Platform game, or platformer, is a video game genre characterized by jumping to and from suspended platforms or over obstacles. ... For the video game system, see Nintendo Entertainment System. ... Legend of Zelda Famicom Disk The Family Computer Disk System , FDS) was released on February 21, 1986 by Nintendo as a peripheral to their overwhelmingly popular Family Computer (Famicom) console in Japan. ... Hironobu Sakaguchi ) (born November 25, 1962) is a Japanese game designer, game director and game producer. ... The Enix Corporation ) was a company that produced Japanese video games and manga. ... Dragon Warrior, the first game in the Dragon Quest series, hence also known as Dragon Quest, was developed by Enix (now Square Enix) and released in 1986 in Japan for the MSX and the Nintendo Family Computer (Famicom). The game was localized for North American release in 1989, but the... Final Fantasy ) is a console role-playing game developed and published in Japan by Square (now Square Enix) in 1987 and published in North America by Nintendo of America in 1990, and is the inaugural game in Squares flagship Final Fantasy series. ...


Following the success of the first game, Square immediately developed a second installment. Unlike a typical sequel, Final Fantasy II features a world bearing only thematic similarities to its predecessor. Some of the gameplay elements, such as the character advancement system, were also overhauled. This approach to has continued throughout the series; each major Final Fantasy game features a new setting, cast of characters, and battle system. Final Fantasy II on the SNES, see Final Fantasy IV Foundation for a Free Information Infrastructure Final Fantasy II ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) in 1988 for the Nintendo Family Computer (Famicom, known internationally as the Nintendo Entertainment System) as a... Gameplay includes all player experiences during the interaction with game systems, especially formal games. ... Experience points (often abbreviated as exp, ep or xp) are a representation of a characters advancement and improvement in skills in role-playing games and computer role-playing games. ...

Image File history File links Magitek armor, from the Square Co. ... Image File history File links Magitek armor, from the Square Co. ... Final Fantasy VI ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) in 1994 as a part of the Final Fantasy series. ... Yoshitaka Amano (天野 喜孝 Amano Yoshitaka, originally 天野 嘉孝 (pronounced the same), born July 28, 1952) is a Japanese artist, best known for his illustrations for Vampire Hunter D and for his character designs for the video game series Final Fantasy. ...

Design

See also: Category: Final Fantasy designers

The first five games were directed by Hironobu Sakaguchi, who also provided the original concept. He served as a producer for subsequent games until he left Square in 2001.[43][44][45][46][47] Yoshinori Kitase took over directing the games until Final Fantasy VIII,[44][45][46] and has been followed by a new director for each new title. Hiroyuki Itō has designed several gameplay systems, including Final Fantasy V's Job System, Final Fantasy VIII's Junction System[46] and the Active Time Battle concept, which was used from Final Fantasy IV until Final Fantasy IX. Itō also co-directed Final Fantasy VI with Kitase.[44] Square Enix producer Yoshinori Kitase has been credited on the following games: Final Fantasy X-2 Kingdom Hearts Final Fantasy X Final Fantasy Anthology Final Fantasy VIII Ehrgeiz: God Bless the Ring Final Fantasy VII Chrono Trigger Final Fantasy VI Final Fantasy V Final Fantasy Adventure He is currently working... Hiroyuki Itō (JP:伊藤 裕之) is a game director and designer for Square Enix, and is most known for his work in the role-playing game series, Final Fantasy. ... “FF5” redirects here. ... Final Fantasy VIII ) is a console and computer role-playing game developed and published by Square Co. ... Picture showing the ATB in Final Fantasy IX The Active Time Battle (ATB) system in a computer role-playing game is an alternative to a turn-based system. ...


Kenji Terada was the scenario writer for the first four games; Kitase took over as scenario writer for Final Fantasy V through Final Fantasy VII. Kazushige Nojima became the series' primary scenario writer from Final Fantasy VII until his resignation in October 2003; he has since formed his own company, Stellavista. Nojima partially or completely wrote the stories for Final Fantasy VII, Final Fantasy VIII, Final Fantasy X, and Final Fantasy X-2. He has also worked as the scenario writer for the spin off series, Kingdom Hearts.[48] Square Enix continues to contract story and scenario work to Nojima and Stellavista. Kenji Terada (寺田 憲史 Terada Kenji) is a Japanese script writer, animation director, series organizer, novelist and scenario writer. ... Scenarist Kazushige Nojima is the founder of Stellavista Ltd. ... Final Fantasy VIII ) is a console and computer role-playing game developed and published by Square Co. ... It has been suggested that Characters of Final Fantasy X-2 be merged into this article or section. ... The logo of Kingdom Hearts, the first game in the series. ...


Artistic design, including character and monster creations, was handled by Japanese artist Yoshitaka Amano from Final Fantasy through Final Fantasy VI. Amano also handled title logo designs for all of the main series and all of the image illustrations from Final Fantasy VII onward. Following Amano's departure, he was replaced by Tetsuya Nomura,[5] who worked with the series through Final Fantasy X; for Final Fantasy IX, however, character designs were handled by Shukou Murase, Toshiyuki Itahana, and Shin Nagasawa.[47] Nomura is also the character designer of the Compilation of Final Fantasy VII, and all three installments of the upcoming Fabula Nova Crystallis: Final Fantasy XIII. Other designers include Nobuyoshi Mihara and Akihiko Yoshida. Mihara was the character designer for Final Fantasy XI,[49] and Yoshida served as character designer for Final Fantasy Tactics, Final Fantasy XII, the Square-produced Vagrant Story, and the Final Fantasy III remake. Yoshitaka Amano (天野 喜孝 Amano Yoshitaka, originally 天野 嘉孝 (pronounced the same), born July 28, 1952) is a Japanese artist, best known for his illustrations for Vampire Hunter D and for his character designs for the video game series Final Fantasy. ... Final Fantasy VI ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) in 1994 as a part of the Final Fantasy series. ... Final Fantasy VII ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square, and the seventh installment in the Final Fantasy series. ... Tetsuya Nomura ) (born October 8, 1970) is a Japanese video game director and character designer working for Square Enix (formerly Square). ... Final Fantasy X ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix), and the tenth installment in the Final Fantasy video game series; it was released in 2001, and is the first numbered Final Fantasy game for the Sony PlayStation 2 video game console. ... Shukou Murase ) is an anime director and animator. ... Final Fantasy VII ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square, and the seventh installment in the Final Fantasy series. ... Promotional drawing for Vagrant Story showing Ashley Riot and Callo Merlose Akihiko Yoshida (吉田明彦) is a video game character designer, that is, he does the drawings that the 3D models or 2D sprites will be based upon. ... Final Fantasy XI ), also known as Final Fantasy XI: Online, is a massively multiplayer online role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) as a part of the Final Fantasy video game series. ... Final Fantasy Tactics ) is a tactical role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) for the Sony PlayStation video game console. ... Final Fantasy XII ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square Enix for the Sony PlayStation 2 video game console, and the twelfth installment in the Final Fantasy video game series. ... Vagrant Story ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square Co. ... Final Fantasy III is an enhanced remake of the 1990 Japan-only console role-playing game of the same name originally for the Nintendo Entertainment System video game console. ...


Graphics and technology

Final Fantasy debuted on the Nintendo Entertainment System in 1987. It featured small sprite representations of the leading party members on the main world screen because of graphical limitations, while in battle screens, more detailed, full versions of all characters would appear in a side-view perspective. The Super Famicom installments used updated graphics and effects, as well as higher quality music and sound than in previous games, but they were otherwise similar to their predecessors in basic design. Final Fantasy ) is a console role-playing game developed and published in Japan by Square (now Square Enix) in 1987 and published in North America by Nintendo of America in 1990, and is the inaugural game in Squares flagship Final Fantasy series. ... “NES” redirects here. ... In computer graphics, a sprite (also known by other names; see Synonyms below) is a two-dimensional/three-dimensional image or animation that is integrated into a larger scene. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ...

Final Fantasy VII was the first game in the series to incorporate pre-rendered cutscenes.

In August 1995, Square showed an interactive SGI technical demonstration of Final Fantasy for the next generation.[50] Articles in GameFan and Nintendo Power led fans to believe the demo was of a new Final Fantasy title for the Nintendo 64 video game console. However, 1997 saw the release of Final Fantasy VII for the Sony PlayStation and not the Nintendo 64 as many had originally anticipated.[51] This was due to a dispute with Nintendo over its use of faster and more expensive cartridges, as opposed to the slower, cheaper, and much higher capacity compact discs used on rival systems.[52] Final Fantasy VII introduced 3-dimensional graphics with fully pre-rendered backgrounds.[53][54] It was because of this switch to 3D that a CD-ROM format was chosen over a cartridge format.[50] Final Fantasy VII Beginning Cutscene with Aeris This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ... Final Fantasy VII Beginning Cutscene with Aeris This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ... Final Fantasy VII ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square, and the seventh installment in the Final Fantasy series. ... A cut scene or cutscene (sometimes also referred to as a cinematic) is a sequence in a video game over which the player has no control. ... Final Fantasy VI ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) in 1994 as a part of the Final Fantasy series. ... Diehard GameFan magazine (later known simply as GameFan magazine) was a publication started by Dave Halverson in 1992 that provided coverage of domestic and import video games. ... Nintendo Power magazine is a monthly news and strategy magazine formerly published in-house by Nintendo. ... The Nintendo 64 ), often abbreviated as N64, is Nintendos third home video game console for the international market. ... Game console redirects here. ... Final Fantasy VII ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square, and the seventh installment in the Final Fantasy series. ... For other uses, see PlayStation (disambiguation). ... The Nintendo 64 ), often abbreviated as N64, is Nintendos third home video game console for the international market. ... Cartridge for the VIC 20 homecomputer In various types of electronic equipment, a cartridge can refer one method of adding different functionality or content (e. ... CD redirects here. ... This article is about process of creating 3D computer graphics. ... An image created by using POV-Ray 3. ... The CD-ROM (an abbreviation for Compact Disc Read-Only Memory (ROM)) is a non-volatile optical data storage medium using the same physical format as audio compact discs, readable by a computer with a CD-ROM drive. ...


Starting with Final Fantasy VIII, the series adopted a more photo-realistic look.[55] Like Final Fantasy VII, some full motion video sequences would have video playing in the background, with the polygonal characters composited on top. Final Fantasy IX returned briefly to the more stylized design of earlier games in the series. It still maintained, and in many cases slightly upgraded, most of the graphical techniques utilized in the previous two games in the series. Final Fantasy X was released on the PlayStation 2,[20] and made use of the much more powerful hardware to render many cutscenes in real-time, rather than in pre-rendered FMV sequences. Rather than having 3D models moving about in pre-rendered backgrounds, the game featured full 3D environments, giving it a more dynamic look, though the camera angle was fixed. It was also the first Final Fantasy game to introduce voice acting, occurring throughout the majority of the game, even with many minor characters. This aspect added a whole new dimension of depth to the character's reactions, emotions, and development.[56] Final Fantasy VIII ) is a console and computer role-playing game developed and published by Square Co. ... This article is about the artistic movement. ... Screenshot of an FMV from Final Fantasy VIII using Bink Video. ... Polygons are used in computer graphics to compose images that are three-dimensional in appearance. ... Final Fantasy IX ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix), and the ninth installment in the Final Fantasy video game series. ... Final Fantasy X ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix), and the tenth installment in the Final Fantasy video game series; it was released in 2001, and is the first numbered Final Fantasy game for the Sony PlayStation 2 video game console. ... PS2 redirects here. ... Screenshot of an FMV from Final Fantasy VIII using Bink Video. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


Taking a temporary divergence, Final Fantasy XI used the PlayStation 2's online capabilities as an MMORPG.[57] Initially released for PlayStation 2 with a PC port arriving 6 months later, Final Fantasy XI was also released on the Xbox 360 nearly four years after its first release in Japan.[58] This was the first Final Fantasy game to use a free rotating camera. Final Fantasy XII was released in 2006 for the PlayStation 2 and utilizes only half as many polygons as Final Fantasy X in exchange for more advanced textures and lighting.[59][60] It also retains the freely rotating camera from Final Fantasy XI. Final Fantasy XIII was shown at E3 2006 and is slated to be the first game in the main series for PlayStation 3.[61] The game will make use of Crystal Tools, a middleware engine developed by Square Enix. Final Fantasy XI ), also known as Final Fantasy XI: Online, is a massively multiplayer online role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) as a part of the Final Fantasy video game series. ... An image from World of Warcraft, one of the largest commercial MMORPGs as of 2004, based on active subscriptions. ... It has been suggested that Xbox 360 Elite be merged into this article or section. ... Final Fantasy XII ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square Enix for the Sony PlayStation 2 video game console, and the twelfth installment in the Final Fantasy video game series. ... Final Fantasy XIII ) is an upcoming console role-playing game developed and published by Square Enix exclusively for the Sony PlayStation 3 as a part of the Final Fantasy video game series. ... E³ logo The Electronic Entertainment Expo, commonly known as E³, was an annual trade show for the computer and video games industry presented by the Entertainment Software Association. ... The PlayStation 3 , trademarked PLAYSTATION®3,[3] commonly abbreviated PS3) is the third home video game console produced by Sony Computer Entertainment; successor to the PlayStation 2. ...


Merchandise and other media

Further information: List of Final Fantasy media

Square Enix has expanded the Final Fantasy series into various different mediums. In addition to the games, there have been CGI films, animated series, books, and different types of merchandise.[1] Many of the games have been re-released on multiple platforms, and several have been adapted into manga and novels. Final Fantasy Tactics Advance and Final Fantasy: Unlimited have been adapted into radio dramas. Many of the titles' official soundtracks have been released for sale as well. Companion books, which normally provide in-depth game information, have also been published. In Japan, they are published by Square and are called Ultimania books. In North America, they take the form of standard strategy guides. Final Fantasy ) is a popular series of console role playing games developed and published by Square Enix (originally Square). ... SQUARE ENIX (Japanese: スクウェア・エニックス) is a Japanese producer of popular video games and manga. ... Computer-generated imagery[1] (also known as CGI) is the application of the field of computer graphics or, more specifically, 3D computer graphics to special effects in films, television programs, commercials, simulators and simulation generally, and printed media. ... This article is about the comics created in Japan. ... For other uses, see Novel (disambiguation). ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Final Fantasy: Unlimited is a Japanese anime series based on Squaresofts popular Final Fantasy video game franchise. ... Radio drama is a form of audio storytelling broadcast on radio. ... Ultimania (Japanese: アルティマニア Arutimania) is a series of comprehensive video game guides published by Square-Enix (formerly under the title of their now disbanded publishing subsidiary, DigiCube) in Japan. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Anime and films

Theatrical release poster of Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within
Theatrical release poster of Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within

There have been several anime and CGI films produced that are based either directly on individual Final Fantasy games or on the series as a whole. The first was an OVA titled Final Fantasy: Legend of the Crystals and was based on Final Fantasy V. The story was set on the same world as the game though 200 years in the future. It was released as four 30-minute episodes first in Japan in 1994 and later released in the United States by Urban Vision in 1998.[62] In 2001, Square Pictures released their first feature film, Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within. The story was set on a future-Earth that had been invaded by alien life forms.[63] The Spirits Within was the first animated feature to seriously attempt to portray photorealistic CGI humans, but was considered a box office bomb.[1][63][64] One reviewer points out that the environmentally-themed plot may have been ahead of its time.[65] 2001 also saw the release of Final Fantasy: Unlimited, a 25 episode anime series based on the common elements of the Final Fantasy series. It was broadcast in Japan by TV Tokyo and released in North America by ADV Films.[66] In 2005, Final Fantasy VII Advent Children and Last Order: Final Fantasy VII were released as part of the Compilation of Final Fantasy VII. Advent Children was a CGI film directed by Tetsuya Nomura and Last Order was a short OVA directed by Morio Asaka. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 399 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (503 × 755 pixels, file size: 58 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is of a poster, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher or the creator of the work depicted. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 399 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (503 × 755 pixels, file size: 58 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is of a poster, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher or the creator of the work depicted. ... Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within is a science fiction movie by Hironobu Sakaguchi, the creator of the Final Fantasy series of video games. ... Animé redirects here. ... Computer-generated imagery[1] (also known as CGI) is the application of the field of computer graphics or, more specifically, 3D computer graphics to special effects in films, television programs, commercials, simulators and simulation generally, and printed media. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... Original Video Animation ), abbreviated OVA ), is a term used for anime titles that are released direct-to-video, without prior showings on TV or in theaters. ... “FF5” redirects here. ... Urban Vision Entertainment Inc. ... Square Pictures, located in Honolulu, Hawaii, was a computer-animated film division of Square Co. ... Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within is a science fiction movie by Hironobu Sakaguchi, the creator of the Final Fantasy series of video games. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ... Green people redirects here. ... This article is about the artistic movement. ... Cleopatra is the biggest box-office bomb of all time. ... Final Fantasy: Unlimited is a Japanese anime series based on Squaresofts popular Final Fantasy video game franchise. ... The logo of TV Tokyo. ... ADV Films logo ADV Films is the home video publication arm of A.D. Vision based in Houston, Texas. ... Final Fantasy VII Advent Children[1] ) is a 2005 computer-animated film directed by Tetsuya Nomura, co-directed by Takeshi Nozue, written by Kazushige Nojima and based on the highly successful 1997 console role-playing game Final Fantasy VII. The film is set two years after Final Fantasy VII and... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Final Fantasy VII. (Discuss) Official series logo Compilation of Final Fantasy VII is the formal title for a series of games and films developed in 2004 and 2005 by Japanese console developer Square Enix. ... Tetsuya Nomura ) (born October 8, 1970) is a Japanese video game director and character designer working for Square Enix (formerly Square). ... Morio Asaka ) is a Japanese anime director and one of the best known members of the Japanese animation studio Madhouse. ...


Printed adaptations

Several of the video games have either been adapted into or have had spin-offs in the form of manga and novels. The first was the novelization of Final Fantasy II in 1989 and was followed by a manga adaptation of Final Fantasy III in 1992.[67][68] The past decade has seen an increase in the number of adaptations and spin-offs. Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within has been adapted into a novel,[69] Crystal Chronicles has been adapted into a manga,[70] and Final Fantasy XI has had a novel and manhwa set in its continuity.[71][72] Two novellas based on the Final Fantasy VII universe have also been released. The Final Fantasy: Unlimited story was partially continued in novels and a manga after the anime series had ended. A spin-off (or spinoff) is a new organization or entity formed by a split from a larger one such as a new company formed from a university research group. ... This article is about the comics created in Japan. ... For other uses, see Novel (disambiguation). ... Final Fantasy II on the SNES, see Final Fantasy IV Foundation for a Free Information Infrastructure Final Fantasy II ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) in 1988 for the Nintendo Family Computer (Famicom, known internationally as the Nintendo Entertainment System) as a... It has been suggested that Characters of Final Fantasy III be merged into this article or section. ... For other uses, see Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles (disambiguation). ... Final Fantasy XI ), also known as Final Fantasy XI: Online, is a massively multiplayer online role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) as a part of the Final Fantasy video game series. ... Manhwa is the general Korean term for comics and print cartoons (common usage also includes animated cartoons). ... A novella is a narrative work of prose fiction somewhat longer than a short story but shorter than a novel. ... Final Fantasy VII ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square, and the seventh installment in the Final Fantasy series. ...


Reception

The Final Fantasy series has been overall critically well received and commercially successful, though each installment has seen different levels of success. In July 2007, the series was listed as the fourth-best-selling video game franchise.[1] The series has had a steady increase in total sales. By August 2003, the series had sold 45 million units worldwide[73] and 63 million units by December 2005.[74] As of December 2007, the series has sold over 80 million units worldwide.[7] Several titles have been commercially successful as well. At the end of 2007, the seventh, eighth, and ninth best-selling RPGs were Final Fantasy VII, Final Fantasy VIII, and Final Fantasy X respectively.[75] Final Fantasy VII has sold more than 9.5 million copies worldwide, earning it the position of the best-selling Final Fantasy title.[76] Within two days of Final Fantasy VIII's North American release on September 9, 1999, it became the top-selling video game in the United States, a position it held for more than three weeks.[77] Though not as commercially successful as Final Fantasy VII or Final Fantasy VIII, Final Fantasy IX was a top seller at the time of its release.[78][79][80] Final Fantasy X sold over 1.4 million Japanese units in pre-orders alone;[81] which set a record for the fastest-selling console RPG.[75] Final Fantasy XII sold more than 1,764,000 copies in its first week in Japan.[82] By November 6, 2006—one week after its release—Final Fantasy XII had shipped approximately 1.5 million copies in North America.[83] This is a list of video games that have sold one million copies or more, including the top ten best-selling franchises. ... Final Fantasy VIII ) is a console and computer role-playing game developed and published by Square Co. ... Final Fantasy X ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix), and the tenth installment in the Final Fantasy video game series; it was released in 2001, and is the first numbered Final Fantasy game for the Sony PlayStation 2 video game console. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... Final Fantasy IX ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix), and the ninth installment in the Final Fantasy video game series. ... Final Fantasy XII ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square Enix for the Sony PlayStation 2 video game console, and the twelfth installment in the Final Fantasy video game series. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Critical response

The series and several specific games within it have been credited for introducing and popularizing many concepts and features that are widely used in console RPGs.[5][6] In addition, it has been praised for the quality of its visuals and soundtracks.[1] The Final Fantasy series was awarded a star on the Walk of Game in 2006. WalkOfGame.com commented that the series has sought perfection as well as been a risk taker in innovation.[8] IGN has commented the menu system used by the series is a major detractor for many and is a "significant reason why they haven't touched the series."[27] The site has also heavily criticized the use of random encounters in the series' battle systems.[84][85] They also stated the various attempts to bring the series into film and animation have either been unsuccessful, unremarkable, or did not live up to the standards of the games.[86] In July 2007, Edge magazine criticized the series for a number of related titles that include the phrase "Final Fantasy" in their titles, which are considered to be not of the same quality as previous titles. They also commented that with the departure of Hironobu Sakaguchi, the series might be in danger of growing stale.[1] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Walk of Game is an area of the Metreon complex building in San Francisco, California that honors great video game achievements. ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Edge is a multi-format computer and video game magazine published by Future Publishing in the United Kingdom. ... Hironobu Sakaguchi ) (born November 25, 1962) is a Japanese game designer, game director and game producer. ...


Many Final Fantasy games have been included in various lists of top games. Two games were listed on GameFAQs' "The 10 Best Games Ever" contest in Fall 2005, with Final Fantasy VII voted as the "Best Game Ever." Six other Final Fantasy titles were included in the additional 90 games listed.[87] GameFAQs has also held a contest for the best video game series ever, with Final Fantasy being the runner-up, behind The Legend of Zelda.[88] Several games have been listed on multiple IGN "Top Games" lists.[89][90][91][92] Eleven games were listed on Famitsu's 2006 "Top 100 Favorite Games of All Time", four of which were in the top ten, with Final Fantasy X and Final Fantasy VII being first and second, respectively.[93] Many Final Fantasy characters have been included in GameFAQs' "Character Battle" contests. Final Fantasy VII's Cloud Strife and Sephiroth have both won once and have been listed as the runner-up multiple times.[94][95][96][97] In ScrewAttack's list of "Top Ten Coolest Characters", Cloud was rated the number two "coolest" character; Sephiroth was also considered but the list stipulated one character per franchise.[98] GameFAQs is a website that hosts FAQs and walkthroughs for video games. ... Final Fantasy VII ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square, and the seventh installment in the Final Fantasy series. ... GameFAQs is a website that hosts FAQs and walkthroughs for video games. ... The Legend of Zelda ) is a high fantasy action-adventure video game series created by game designer Shigeru Miyamoto and developed and published by Nintendo. ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Cover art for Issue 1 of Famitsū magazine, June 1986, then known as Famicom Tsūshin Famitsū abbreviated ファミ Fami) is a Japanese video game magazine published by Enterbrain, Inc. ... Final Fantasy X ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix), and the tenth installment in the Final Fantasy video game series; it was released in 2001, and is the first numbered Final Fantasy game for the Sony PlayStation 2 video game console. ... Cloud Strife ) is the main protagonist in Squares (now Square Enix) role-playing game Final Fantasy VII and several of its sequels and spin-offs. ... Sephiroth ) is a fictional character and recurring villain in Squares (now Square Enix) role-playing game, Final Fantasy VII. He was designed by character designer Tetsuya Nomura and is characterized as a tall man with long silver hair. ... ScrewAttack is a video game-related website that showcases original entertainment for an audience of video game enthusiasts. ...


Several individual Final Fantasy titles have garnered extra attention; some for their positive reception and others for their negative reception. Final Fantasy VII won GameFAQs' "Best. Game. Ever." tournament in 2004.[99] Despite the success of Final Fantasy VII, it is sometimes criticized as being overrated. In 2003, GameSpy listed it as the 7th most overrated game of all time.[100] Dirge of Cerberus: Final Fantasy VII shipped 392,000 units in its first week of release,[101] but received review scores that were much lower than that of other Final Fantasy games.[102][103] A delayed, negative review after the Japanese release of Dirge of Cerberus from Japanese gaming magazine, Famitsu, hinted at a controversy between the magazine and Square Enix.[104] The MMORPG, Final Fantasy XI, reached over 200,000 active daily players in March 2006[105] and had reached over half a million subscribers by July 2007.[1] Though Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within was praised for its visuals, the plot was criticized[106] and was considered a box office bomb.[1][63][64] Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles for the GameCube received overall positive review scores, but reviews stated that the use of Game Boy Advances as controllers was a big detractor.[6][107] GameSpy, also known as GameSpy Industries, is a division of IGN Entertainment, which operates a network of game Web sites and provides online video game-related services and software. ... Cover art for Issue 1 of FamitsÅ« magazine, June 1986, then known as Famicom TsÅ«shin FamitsÅ« abbreviated ファミ Fami) is a Japanese video game magazine published by Enterbrain, Inc. ... Final Fantasy XI ), also known as Final Fantasy XI: Online, is a massively multiplayer online role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) as a part of the Final Fantasy video game series. ... For other uses, see Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles (disambiguation). ... The Nintendo GameCube (Japanese: ゲームキューブ; originally code-named Dolphin during development; abbreviated as GCN) is Nintendos fourth home video game console, belonging to the 128-bit era; the same generation as Segas Dreamcast, Sonys PlayStation 2, and Microsofts Xbox. ... “GBA” redirects here. ...


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Edge is a multi-format computer and video game magazine published by Future Publishing in the United Kingdom. ... Future Publishing (FTSE:FUTR) is a magazine publishing company based in Bath, UK. Future Publishing employs more than 1,500 people worldwide, and is one of the largest publishing houses in the UK. It is responsible for publishing over 150 magazines, in the UK, US, France and Italy. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... SQUARE ENIX (Japanese: スクウェア・エニックス) is a Japanese producer of popular video games and manga. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Edge is a multi-format computer and video game magazine published by Future Publishing in the United Kingdom. ... Future Publishing (FTSE:FUTR) is a magazine publishing company based in Bath, UK. Future Publishing employs more than 1,500 people worldwide, and is one of the largest publishing houses in the UK. It is responsible for publishing over 150 magazines, in the UK, US, France and Italy. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... GameTrailers (GT) is a media website that specializes in video game related content. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameTrailers (GT) is a media website that specializes in video game related content. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameTrailers (GT) is a media website that specializes in video game related content. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... SQUARE ENIX (Japanese: スクウェア・エニックス) is a Japanese producer of popular video games and manga. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A Kingdom Hearts strategy guide from BradyGames BradyGames is a publishing company in the United States operating as an imprint of Dorling Kindersley, which specialises in video game strategy guides, covering multiple video game platforms. ... SQUARE ENIX (Japanese: スクウェア・エニックス) is a Japanese producer of popular video games and manga. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... MusicBrainz is a project that aims to create an open content music encyclopedia. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... MusicBrainz is a project that aims to create an open content music encyclopedia. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... MobyGames is a website devoted to cataloging computer and video games, both past and present. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The current version of the article or section reads like an advertisement. ... Future Publishing (FTSE:FUTR) is a magazine publishing company based in Bath, UK. Future Publishing employs more than 1,500 people worldwide, and is one of the largest publishing houses in the UK. It is responsible for publishing over 150 magazines, in the UK, US, France and Italy. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... SQUARE ENIX (Japanese: スクウェア・エニックス) is a Japanese producer of popular video games and manga. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Metacritic is a website that collates reviews of music albums, games, movies, TV shows, DVDs and books. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... RPGamer is a website which reviews, previews, and reports on various games in the Role Playing Game genre. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Yahoo redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Yahoo redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Amazon. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Yahoo redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... SQUARE ENIX (Japanese: スクウェア・エニックス) is a Japanese producer of popular video games and manga. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... SQUARE ENIX (Japanese: スクウェア・エニックス) is a Japanese producer of popular video games and manga. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Guinness World Records 2008 edition. ... SQUARE ENIX (Japanese: スクウェア・エニックス) is a Japanese producer of popular video games and manga. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... SQUARE ENIX (Japanese: スクウェア・エニックス) is a Japanese producer of popular video games and manga. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameFAQs is a website that hosts FAQs and walkthroughs for video games. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The cover of the January 95 issue of Next Generation. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameTrailers (GT) is a media website that specializes in video game related content. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameFAQs is a website that hosts FAQs and walkthroughs for video games. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpy, also known as GameSpy Industries, is a division of IGN Entertainment, which operates a network of game Web sites and provides online video game-related services and software. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Game Rankings is a website which keeps track of video game reviews from other sites, and combines them to present an average rating for each game. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Metacritic is a website that collates reviews of music albums, games, movies, TV shows, DVDs and books. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... This article is about the year. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Final Fantasy Portal
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Final Fantasy
  • Square Enix's official Final Fantasy website
  • Square Enix's official Final Fantasy website (Japanese)
  • Final Fantasy Games at the Open Directory Project
  • Final Fantasy Wiki
Image File history File links Portal. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... The Open Directory Project (ODP), also known as dmoz (from , its original domain name), is a multilingual open content directory of World Wide Web links owned by Netscape that is constructed and maintained by a community of volunteer editors. ... Final Fantasy ) is a console role-playing game developed and published in Japan by Square (now Square Enix) in 1987 and published in North America by Nintendo of America in 1990, and is the inaugural game in Squares flagship Final Fantasy series. ... Final Fantasy II on the SNES, see Final Fantasy IV Foundation for a Free Information Infrastructure Final Fantasy II ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) in 1988 for the Nintendo Family Computer (Famicom, known internationally as the Nintendo Entertainment System) as a... It has been suggested that Characters of Final Fantasy III be merged into this article or section. ... Final Fantasy III is an enhanced remake of the 1990 Japan-only console role-playing game of the same name originally for the Nintendo Entertainment System video game console. ... Final Fantasy IV ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) in 1991 as a part of the Final Fantasy series. ... Final Fantasy IV ) is an enhanced remake of the original Final Fantasy IV, which was released in 1991. ... “FF5” redirects here. ... Final Fantasy VI ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) in 1994 as a part of the Final Fantasy series. ... Final Fantasy VII ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square, and the seventh installment in the Final Fantasy series. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Final Fantasy VII. (Discuss) Official series logo Compilation of Final Fantasy VII is the formal title for a series of games and films developed in 2004 and 2005 by Japanese console developer Square Enix. ... Final Fantasy VIII ) is a console and computer role-playing game developed and published by Square Co. ... Final Fantasy IX ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix), and the ninth installment in the Final Fantasy video game series. ... Final Fantasy X ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix), and the tenth installment in the Final Fantasy video game series; it was released in 2001, and is the first numbered Final Fantasy game for the Sony PlayStation 2 video game console. ... It has been suggested that Characters of Final Fantasy X-2 be merged into this article or section. ... Final Fantasy XI ), also known as Final Fantasy XI: Online, is a massively multiplayer online role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) as a part of the Final Fantasy video game series. ... Final Fantasy XII ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square Enix for the Sony PlayStation 2 video game console, and the twelfth installment in the Final Fantasy video game series. ... Final Fantasy XIII ) is an upcoming console role-playing game developed and published by Square Enix exclusively for the Sony PlayStation 3 as a part of the Final Fantasy video game series. ... Fabula Nova Crystallis Final Fantasy XIII ) is the collective name of a series of games made under the Final Fantasy XIII label by Square Enix Co. ... Final Fantasy ) is a popular series of console role playing games developed and published by Square Enix (originally Square). ... Final Fantasy ) is a popular series of console role playing games developed and published by Square Enix (originally Square). ... Final Fantasy ) is a popular series of console role playing games developed and published by Square Enix (originally Square). ... Final Fantasy ) is a popular series of console role playing games developed and published by Square Enix (originally Square). ... Final Fantasy ) is a popular series of console role playing games developed and published by Square Enix (originally Square). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Though each Final Fantasy story is independent, many themes and elements of gameplay recur throughout the series. ... Final Fantasy ) is a video game franchise by Square Enix that began in 1987 as an eponymous console role-playing game developed by Square. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Final Fantasy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5115 words)
Two of them, Final Fantasy III and Final Fantasy XII, have yet to be officially released outside of Japan; however, both are scheduled to appear in North America (the former for the Nintendo DS, and the latter for the PlayStation 2) by the end of the year.
In Final Fantasy IX, each character reflected a job in previous Final Fantasies, such as Zidane Tribal who was a thief, and Freya Crescent, whose appearance is similar to that of a red mage while her talents were clearly derived from Dragoons.
Final Fantasy XII was released on March 16, 2006 in Japan for the PlayStation 2.
Final Fantasy (video game) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5148 words)
Final Fantasy was developed during Square's brush with bankruptcy in 1987.
Final Fantasy, along with the original Dragon Quest, proved to be one of the most influential early console role-playing games, and played a major role in legitimizing and popularizing the genre.
It is featured in the ending theme songs of Final Fantasy V and Final Fantasy VI as the last three minutes of the 18+ minute piece, part of the ending theme in Final Fantasy VII, and in the very end of Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children as the movement immediately preceding the song Calling.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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