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Encyclopedia > Film soundtrack

A film soundtrack is the music that is from or inspired by a feature film. Soundtracks themselves are not limited to film. One may find soundtracks to television shows, ranging from ER to the anime Cowboy Bebop, and video games such as the Final Fantasy series. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... A reel of film, which predates digital cinematography. ... In film formats, the soundtrack is the physical area of the film which records the synchronized sound. ... A television program is the content of television broadcasting. ... ER is an Emmy-winning American serial medical drama created by novelist Michael Crichton and set primarily in the emergency room of fictional County General Hospital in Cook County, Chicago, Illinois. ... Animé redirects here. ... Original run April 3, 1998 – April 23, 1999 Episodes 26 Movie: Knockin on Heavens Door (天国の扉) Director Shinichiro Watanabe Writer Keiko Nobumoto Studio Sunrise BONES Bandai Visual[2] Released September 1, 2001 Runtime 115 min. ... This article is about computer and video games. ... This article is about the Final Fantasy franchise. ...


Soundtracks can be divided by purpose and placement. As a general rule, soundtracks are divided into the score and the songs from (or inspired by) the movie/TV show/video game. A film score is a set of musical compositions written to accompany a film. ... This page is about musical songs. ...

Contents

Origin

Main article: Sound film

It is likely the film soundtrack came into existence about the same time as films themselves. Early films were silent, but were released with cue sheets or scores so that individual theater houses could play music, recorded or live, at appropriate places in the film. The first reels of 1961's West Side Story and 2001's Moulin Rouge! follow the practice of the era of silent film by beginning with an orchestra playing the opening theme. With the advent of talkies in 1927, music was optically integrated into the actual film itself, and the wide world of film soundtracks was born. 1902 poster advertising Gaumonts sound films, depicting an optimistically vast auditorium A sound film is a motion picture with synchronized sound, or sound technologically coupled to image, as opposed to a silent film. ... Film may refer to: photographic film a motion picture in academics, the study of motion pictures as an art form a thin skin or membrane, or any covering or coating, whether transparent or opaque a thin layer of liquid, either on a solid or liquid surface or free-standing Film... A silent film is a film which has no accompanying soundtrack. ... Historical records of events have been made for thousands of years in one form or another. ... West Side Story is a 1961 film directed by Robert Wise and Jerome Robbins. ... Moulin Rouge is a 2001 Academy Award-winning jukebox musical film directed by Baz Luhrmann. ... A sound film (or talkie) is a motion picture with synchronized sound, as opposed to a silent movie. ...


Score (background music)

Main article Film score

The score to a film is also known as its background music. This is arguably the most common type of music heard on a film soundtrack, is music composed and placed to enhance the desired emotion of a scene, be it positive or negative. The actors on screen are talking and moving normally, that is, they are neither singing nor dancing nor interacting with the music in any way (except in cases of a spoof). A person watching the movie may not be aware that anything is playing, but might comment on the poorness or flatness of a scene should the music be removed. The background music is usually orchestrated without meaningful vocals (with the exception of some chanting), and somewhat formless, based heavily on musical peaks and troughs that highlight the scene but which otherwise may be nonsensical or even boring when played alone. A film score is a set of musical compositions written to accompany a film. ... In contemporary usage, a parody (or lampoon) is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... A chant is the rhythmic speaking or singing of words or sounds, either on a single pitch or with a simple notes and often including a great deal of repetition or statis. ...


Most background music follows a general pattern of instrumentation and technique to achieve whatever ends the composer desires. Common examples of such devices used in background music include trilling violins to indicate suspense, legato flutes to convey peaceful or pastoral setting, trumpet fanfares for military or martial scenes, and drumming for tribal events. For other uses, see Instrumentation (disambiguation). ... The trill is a musical ornament consisting of a rapid alternation between two adjacent notes of a scale (compare mordent and tremolo). ... The violin is a stringed musical instrument that has four strings tuned a fifth apart. ... In musical notation legato indicates that musical notes are played smoothly. ... This article pertains to the musical instrument. ... Trumpeter redirects here. ... For other uses, see Fanfare (disambiguation). ... Marcus Valerius Martialis, known in English as Martial, was a Latin poet from Hispania (the Iberian Peninsula) best known for his twelve books of Epigrams, published in Rome between AD 86 and 103, during the reigns of the emperors Domitian, Nerva and Trajan. ... For other uses, see Drum (disambiguation). ... http://www. ...


Movies with notable soundtracks consisting mainly of background music include the Lord of the Rings movie trilogy (Howard Shore, composer), Star Wars (John Williams, composer), The Mission (Ennio Morricone, composer) and The Piano (Michael Nyman, composer). This article is about the Peter Jackson films. ... Howard Leslie Shore (born October 18, 1946) is an Oscar, Golden Globe and Grammy Award-winning Canadian composer, best known for composing the scores to The Lord of the Rings film trilogy and films of David Cronenberg. ... This article is about the series. ... Williams conducting the London Symphony Orchestra during the recording of the score for Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace. ... The Mission is a 1986 British film about the experiences of a Jesuit missionary in eighteenth century South America. ... Ennio Morricone (born November 10, 1928; sometimes also credited as Dan Savio or Leo Nichols) is an Italian composer especially noted for his film scores. ... This article is about the film. ... This article is about the composer/musician Michael Nyman. ...


Themes

Closely related to a movie’s background music is the theme(s) of the movie. A theme is a particular melodic or rhythmic motif that appears in the music whenever a certain event, usually the presence or entrance of a major character, occurs (see leitmotif). Themes differ from background music in that they are usually tuneful and will stand alone if removed from the context of the movie. Also unlike background music, the song may often have purposeful lyrics. In music, a motif is a perceivable or salient reoccurring fragment or succession of notes that may used to construct the entirety or parts of complete melodies, themes. ... A leitmotif (IPA pronunciation: ) (also leitmotiv; lit. ...


The theme is usually repeated throughout the course of the film. Sometimes, it is introduced early and manipulated with regards to tempo, key, and instrumentation to fit the particular mood. For example, an upbeat theme may be played in a minor mode if the character it is associated with suffers or dies. It may be slowed down for a romantic moment or sped up for stressful emotions. It may be placed in counterpoint with another theme to show a relationship. A theme may also be hinted at as a character develops and be finally played in full when the character reaches a peak. For example, in the Attack of the Clones, when Anakin Skywalker makes the choice to exact revenge on the people who killed his mother, the Imperial March from Star Wars is played in full for the first time that movie. A minor scale in musical theory is a diatonic scale whose third scale degree is an interval of a minor third above the tonic. ... For other uses, see Counterpoint (disambiguation). ... Film poster for Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones (2002) is the fifth Star Wars science fiction movie released and the second part of the prequel trilogy which began with Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace. ... Anakin Skywalker is the central character in the Star Wars franchise. ... The Imperial March (Darth Vaders Theme) is a musical theme recurring in the Star Wars films. ... This article is about the series. ...


A single movie may have one or many strong themes. Often, a movie will have a primary theme played during the opening and/or closing credits that is not heard in totality anywhere else in the film. In certain cases, this song may be sung (usually by a popular singer unrelated to the rest of the film) during the credits, but instrumented when inserted into the film. This is called the title song and is discussed later. A film may have an orchestrated theme as well as a title song, composed by different people with different results. Often, one will succeed commercially while the other will fail.


The theme of a film may eventually come to symbolize a character or the film itself, to the point where the original purpose of the theme may be lost. The opening strains of Also sprach Zarathustra and Blue Danube Waltz by Richard Strauss are inextricably linked to 2001: A Space Odyssey, though few can remember when in the film the themes were first played. Themes are usually titled for the movie they occur in, such as The Theme from Schindler's List or Theme from the Magnificent Seven, and may be distinguished as to why they occur, such as the Love Theme from Romeo and Juliet. The cover for the first part of the first edition. ... This article is about the German composer of tone-poems and operas. ... This article is about the movie. ... The Magnificent Seven is a 1960 western film directed by John Sturges about a group of hired gunmen tasked with protecting a Mexican village from bandits. ...


Title song

A title song is a theme, usually sung to lyrics, and associated with a particular movie that is heard in toto during the credits and rarely anywhere else in the film, except in the case of musicals. Usually the title song is composed for the movie itself, but sometimes existing pieces are used, especially when a current movie is set in a recent era that possessed stereotypical music, such as disco. The singer of the title theme is usually unrelated to the movie itself, with Barbra Streisand or Will Smith being notable exceptions. The musical film is a film genre in which several songs sung by the characters are interwoven into the narrative. ... This article is about the music genre. ... Barbra Streisand (pronounced STRY-sand, IPA: ; born April 24, 1942) is an American singer, theatre and film actress, composer, liberal political activist, film producer and director. ... “W. S.” redirects here. ...


Title songs are, by and large, vague in their references to the film’s particulars, focusing instead on general themes of love, loss, and betrayal. These songs often go on to be commercial successes even if the movie was forgettable, though the fate of both movie and title song are intertwined. One wonders if "My Heart Will Go On" would have become such a hit had not Titanic succeeded as well as it did. The same can be said for "I Will Always Love You" and its corresponding movie The Bodyguard. My Heart Will Go On is the theme song of the 1997 blockbuster film Titanic. ... Titanic is a 1997 American romance film directed, written, produced and edited by James Cameron about the sinking of the RMS Titanic. ... For other uses, see The Bodyguard (disambiguation). ...


Occasionally, a film will have both a popular orchestrated theme and a sung theme. The James Bond films all feature the James Bond theme as well as a movie-specific title song, such as Carly Simon's The Spy who Loved Me (Nobody Does it Better). This article is about the spy series. ... Carly Elisabeth Simon (born June 25, 1945 in New York City) is an Academy Award, Golden Globe and two-time Grammy Award winning American musician who emerged as one of the leading lights of the early 1970s singer-songwriter movement. ...


Musicals and operas

Many films made in the 1940s through 1960s especially were screen-based adaptations of popular stage musicals. Several films of this time originated as musicals, some of which were later adapted to the stage (e.g., Lerner and Loewe's Gigi). Besides the sung portions, there is also background, or "incidental," music used to underscore dialogue (as in stage musicals); this background music may be more prominent in film musicals, because of the greater capacity to have scenes of transition or with special effects. Whereas spoken films (e.g., Gone with the Wind) may at times use recurring themes in the background music, the underscoring, including dance music, in a film (or stage) musical is usually more specifically derived from themes that occur in the vocal numbers. The Black Crook (1866), considered by some historians to be the first musical[1] Musical theatre is a form of theatre combining music, songs, spoken dialogue and dance. ... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... The 1940s decade ran from 1940 to 1949. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... Lerner and Loewe is a designation for the musical comedy writing team of lyricist and librettist Alan Jay Lerner and composer Frederick Loewe. ... Not to be confused with Gigli. ... Gone with the Wind is a 1939 film adapted from Margaret Mitchells 1936 novel of the same name. ... A number in music is a self-contained piece that is combined with other such pieces in a performance. ...


The modern film musical fell out of popularity after the 1960s. Nevertheless, film musicals occasionally have been produced since that time, such as A Little Night Music, Victor/Victoria, Chicago, and Moulin Rouge!. Lately Hollywood seems to produce more musicals as animated films (see below), while Bollywood still embraces the live-action film musical as a viable genre. A Little Night Music is a musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by Hugh Wheeler. ... Victor/Victoria is a 1982 musical comedy film. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... Moulin Rouge is a 2001 Academy Award-winning jukebox musical film directed by Baz Luhrmann. ... ... Bollywood (Hindi: , Urdu: ) is the informal term popularly used for Mumbai-based Hindi-language film industry in India. ...


Significant differences can exist between the stage and film versions of musicals, not only in the plot and details of the script (e.g., On a Clear Day You Can See Forever), but also in the constitution or even creators of the musical numbers (e.g., The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas). Sometimes the original creators of a stage musical have little or no connection with the film version once the film rights have been bought. On a Clear Day, You Can See Forever is an original musical play with music by Burton Lane and lyrics and book by Alan Jay Lerner. ... The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas is a stage and film musical written by Larry L. King. ...


The recordings presented on a soundtrack album from a film musical may not always correspond with the version shown on screen. The album may include numbers omitted from the final cut, may include additional verses or passages not heard in the film, may substitute a different recording or mix of a number, or may omit certain passages within a number. The way dialogue is interpolated can present a different version in the recording from the film.


A standard practice in filming musicals is to have the score with vocals recorded in advance, and then to have the actors lip sync to a playing of the recording while they are in front of the camera. (It is rare in film musicals to film a scene as a "live" performance with orchestra.) This practice allows for other voices to be used for the sung portions than those of the featured actors. Perhaps the most famous off-camera singing voice used for dubbing in filmed musicals is that of Marni Nixon. Part of the craft of editing pre-recorded vocal portions into the film is to make sure that they merge effectively and seamlessly with the surrounding dialogue. Sheet music is written representation of music. ... Lip synchronization is the synchronization of audio signals (sometimes with corresponding video signals) so that there is no noticeable lack of simultaneity between them. ... In filmmaking, dubbing or looping is the process of recording or replacing voices for a motion picture. ... Marni Nixon (born February 22, 1930) is a singer whose renown for dubbing the singing voices of featured actresses in movies earned her the sobriquet The Ghostess with the Mostess. She was born Margaret McEathron in Altadena, California and began singing at a young age in choruses. ...


Related to the above is the genre of filmed operas (that is, vocal musical works that are sung virtually throughout, traditionally originating on stage). Many filmed operas are made from live performances in a theatrical setting. Some filmed operas, however, are made on location, and therefore require lip-synchronization. In this case, often the singers themselves serve as the actors, but sometimes professional actors use those singers' voices before the camera. For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ...


Animated musicals

Most animated films produced by Walt Disney Pictures have been musicals. Indeed, the majority of American feature-length animated films have been musicals, with a notable exception being the animated features produced by Pixar. Animated films share all basic characteristics with their live-action counterparts, except that the incidental music is more likely to be novel, i.e. in the tradition of non-musical film scores. Animation refers to the process in which each frame of a film or movie is produced individually, whether generated as a computer graphic, or by photographing a drawn image, or by repeatedly making small changes to a model (see claymation and stop motion), and then photographing the result. ... Old logo from 1985-2006 Walt Disney Pictures refers to several different entities associated with The Walt Disney Company: Walt Disney Pictures, the film banner, was established as a designation in 1983, prior to which Disney films since the death of Walt Disney were released under the name of the... The musical film is a film genre in which several songs sung by the characters are interwoven into the narrative. ... Pixars studio lot in Emeryville Pixar Animation Studios is an American computer animation studio based in Emeryville, California (USA) notable for its seven Academy Awards. ...


Title songs from animated musicals do sometimes go on to become commercially successful, a fact capitalized upon by such singers as Elton John (The Lion King) and Céline Dion (Beauty and the Beast). Over the years, a number of songwriters have been associated with their work for Disney films, among them Frank Churchill, Leigh Harline, George Burns, Robert B. Sherman & Richard M. Sherman, Alan Menken & Howard Ashman, and Tim Rice. Sir Elton Hercules[1] John CBE[2] (born Reginald Kenneth Dwight on 25 March 1947) is a five-time Grammy and one-time Academy Award-winning English pop/rock singer, composer and pianist. ... This article is about Disneys 1994 film. ... This article is about the musician. ... For other uses, see Beauty and the Beast (disambiguation). ... Frank Churchill (October 20, 1901 - May 14, 1942) was an American composer of popular music for films. ... Leigh Harline (March 26, 1907 - December 10, 1969) was an award-winning film composer. ... George Burns[1], born Nathan Birnbaum (January 20, 1896 – March 9, 1996), was an American comedian and actor. ... Robert B. Sherman (born December 19, 1925) (see also: Sherman Brothers) is an Academy Award-winning American songwriter who specializes in musical films with his brother Richard M. Sherman. ... Robert B. Sherman (born December 19, 1925) and Richard M. Sherman (born June 12, 1928) are Academy Award-winning American songwriters, who specialize in musical film. ... Alan Menken (born July 22, 1949) is an American Broadway and Academy Award winning film score composer. ... Howard Ashman ( May 17, 1950 - March 14, 1991) was an American playwright and movie music lyricist. ... Sir Timothy Miles Bindon Rice (born 10 November 1944) is an English Academy Award, Golden Globe Award, Tony Award and Grammy Award winning lyricist, author, radio presenter and television gameshow panelist. ...


Songs from the movie

Existing in a similar place, but different class, as the score are the so-called songs from the movie, which will be abbreviated SftM for now. SftM are discrete songs, almost always not composed specifically for the movie, heard during the course of the movie itself. A SftM may either be background music or semi-interactive. (Soviet cinematography traditionally relied heavily on songs with lyrics, even in non-musical films.) CCCP redirects here. ...


An SftM used as background music functions much in the same way as an orchestrated piece would. It is added external to the movie and used to heighten the mood. The main difference is its existing as a full, independent song without being a theme (and thus played only once during the film), though a piece such as Shaft would traverse that boundary. Shaft is an album by Isaac Hayes and is the soundtrack album to the movie of the same name. ...


A semi-interactive SftM is a song playing in the context of the movie, such as the background music in a club or a tune heard on the radio of a character’s car. When a semi-interactive SftM is playing, it functions as background music, so it would be rare to see a gang fight scene with a giddy SftM unless the director were going for irony. Ironic redirects here. ...


The average movie soundtrack will contain eight or so SftM by popular artists tangentially or unrelated to the film itself. Forrest Gump's soundtrack is one of the best selling of all times and reads almost like a laundry list of popular tunes from the Baby Boomer generation. For other uses, see Forrest Gump (disambiguation). ... For the video game, see Baby Boomer (video game). ...


Songs inspired by the movie

A somewhat recent invention, songs inspired by the movie are almost always not actually played in the movie itself. Instead, as the title suggests, they are derivative of the musical, cultural, social, etc. themes of the film. This seems to be done primarily to capitalize on the success of a particular film. After the soundtrack to The Lion King was released to great acclaim, Disney released the follow-up album Rhythm of the Pridelands.


Notable soundtracks

This film, television, or video-related list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it.

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... John Murphy is a prominent British film composer from the city of Liverpool. ... 8 Mile stars Eminem (Marshall Mathers) as the young white rapper Jimmy Smith Jr. ... For the sense of losing oneself, see Flow (psychology). ... Alien³ is a science fiction/horror movie that opened May 22, 1992. ... Elliot Goldenthal, born on May 2, 1954, in Brooklyn, New York City, is an American composer of contemporary music and has written works for concert hall, theater, dance and film. ... Though the movie American Graffiti is well known for launching the careers of director George Lucas and actors Ron Howard, Richard Dreyfuss, Suzanne Somers and Harrison Ford, the movie stands out for its ability to accurately reflect the music of the period in which it is set. ... Apocalypse Now is a 1979 Academy Award and Golden Globe winning American film set during the Vietnam War. ... Arthur Rackhams illustration to the Ride of the Valkyries The Ride of the Valkyries (German: Walkürenritt) is the popular term for the beginning of Act III of Die Walküre by Richard Wagner. ... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as they were later called). ... This article is about the song by The Beatles. ... Black Hawk Down is a 2001 film by Ridley Scott, based on the book Black Hawk Down: A Story of Modern War by Mark Bowden. ... Hans Florian Zimmer (born September 12, 1957) is an Academy Award, Grammy, and Golden Globe award-winning film score composer from Germany. ... For other uses, see The Bodyguard (disambiguation). ... Whitney Elizabeth Houston (born August 9, 1963) is a six-time Grammy award winning, American R&B singer, soprano, pianist, actress, film producer, and former model. ... This article is about the 1961 film starring Audrey Hepburn. ... Henry Mancini (April 16, 1924 – June 14, 1994), was an Academy Award winning American composer, conductor and arranger. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Audrey Hepburn (4 May 1929 - 20 January 1993) was an Academy Award and Tony Award winning Anglo-Dutch actress of film and theatre, Broadway stage performer, ballerina, fashion model, and humanitarian. ... Cat People is a 1982 horror film directed by Paul Schrader and starring Nastassja Kinski, Malcolm McDowell, and John Heard. ... Giorgio Moroder (born Giovanni Giorgio Moroder on April 26, 1940 in Ortisei, Italy) is an Academy Award-winning Italian record producer, songwriter and performer, whose groundbreaking work with synthesizers during the 1970s was a significant influence on new wave, techno and electronic music in general. ... David Bowie (IPA: []) (born David Robert Jones on 1947 January 8) is an English singer, songwriter, actor, multi-instrumentalist, producer, arranger and audio engineer. ... Cat People (Putting Out Fire) is a song by David Bowie. ... The Cheetah Girls is a popular Disney Channel Original Movie and a TV musical, released in 2003 and based on a bestselling series of young adult books, The Cheetah Girls by Deborah Gregory. ... The Cheetah Girls 2, a television movie, is the sequel to the Disney Channel Original Movie The Cheetah Girls, starring Raven-Symoné, Adrienne Bailon, Kiely Williams and Sabrina Bryan. ... Profondo Rosso (also known as Deep Red or The Hatchet Murders) is a 1975 giallo thriller film directed by Dario Argento and starring David Hemmings. ... Goblin are an Italian progressive rock band who are known for their soundtracks on Dario Argento films (e. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dario Argento (born September 7, 1940) is an Italian film director, producer and screenwriter. ... Dances with Wolves is a 1990 epic film which tells the story of a United States cavalry officer from the Civil War who travels into the Dakota Territory, near a Sioux tribe. ... John Barry. ... Selmasongs is an album released in September of 2000 by Icelandic singer and actress Björk as a soundtrack to the film Dancer in the Dark, in which she also starred as the main character, Selma. ... Dancer in the Dark is an award-winning musical film drama released in 2000. ... This article is about the musician. ... Ridgemont High School redirects here. ... Flashdance is a musical and romance film released in April 1983, and was one of the most successful films of the early 1980s. ... For the main character of the same name, see Forrest Gump (character) Forrest Gump is a 1994 drama film based on a 1986 novel by Winston Groom and the name of the title character of both. ... Garden State is a 2004 film written by, directed by, and starring Zach Braff, with Natalie Portman, Peter Sarsgaard and co-starring Sir Ian Holm. ... I like to MOO MOO MOO and eat GRASS! ... Zachary Israel Braff (born April 6, 1975) is an American television and film actor, director, screenwriter, and producer. ... For other uses, see Gladiator (disambiguation). ... Hans Florian Zimmer (born September 12, 1957) is an Academy Award, Grammy, and Golden Globe award-winning film score composer from Germany. ... Godzilla is an American science fiction film directed by Roland Emmerich and starred Matthew Broderick, Jean Reno, Maria Pitillo, Hank Azaria, Michael Lerner and Kevin Dunn. ... For the album by Frankee, see The Good, The Bad, The Ugly (Frankee album). ... Ennio Morricone (born November 10, 1928; sometimes also credited as Dan Savio or Leo Nichols) is an Italian composer especially noted for his film scores. ... A Hard Days Night by the Beatles (side one) - Parlophone yellow and black label A Hard Days Night is the third album by The Beatles, released in the UK on 10 July 1964 as the soundtrack to their first film of the same name. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... For the soundtrack of the 1988 original film, see Hairspray (1988 soundtrack) For the soundtrack of the 2002 Broadway musical, see Hairspray (2002 album). ... Marc Shaiman (born October 22, 1959) is a composer, lyricist, arranger and performer for films, television and theatre. ... A celebrity is a person who is widely recognized in a society. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... The Harder They Come is a 1972 Jamaican crime film directed by Perry Henzell. ... Jimmy Cliff, real name James Chambers OM (Jamaica) (born April 1, 1948, in St Catherine, Jamaica) is a Jamaican reggae musician, best known among mainstream audiences for songs like Sittin in Limbo, You Can Get It If You Really Want and Many Rivers to Cross from The Harder They Come... Reggae is a music genre developed in Jamaica in the late 1960s. ... For other uses, see The Jungle Book (disambiguation). ... See also: 1941 in film 1942 1943 in film 1940s in film years in film film // Events Carole Lombard is killed in a plane crash when returning from a War Bond tour. ... Miklós Rózsa (IPA: ) or Miklos Rozsa (April 18, 1907 - July 27, 1995) was a Hungarian-born composer, best known for his film scores, most notably the score to the 1959 epic Ben-Hur. ... This article is about the novel. ... Howard Leslie Shore (born October 18, 1946) is an Oscar, Golden Globe and Grammy Award-winning Canadian composer, best known for composing the scores to The Lord of the Rings film trilogy and films of David Cronenberg. ... A leitmotif (also spelled leitmotiv) is a recurring musical theme, associated within a particular piece of music with a particular person, place or idea. ... For the 2006 movie, see Miami Vice (film). ... This article is about the year. ... Mo Better Blues is a 1990 drama film starring Denzel Washington, Wesley Snipes, and Spike Lee, who also directed. ... Gang Starr is an influential hip hop group that consists of Guru and DJ Premier from Brooklyn, New York. ... Jazz rap is a fusion of alternative hip hop music and jazz, developed in the very late 1980s and early 1990s. ... O Brother, Where Art Thou? is a musical comedy film written and directed by Joel and Ethan Coen, set in Mississippi during the Great Depression. ... Bluegrass music is a form of American roots music. ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... O Lucky Man! (1973) is a surreal British film directed by Lindsay Anderson. ... Alan Price (born April 19, 1941 in Fairfield, Washington, Tyne and Wear, England) is a musician, songwriter, and actor. ... The US edition of The Animals self-titled debut album. ... Once Upon a Time in America (Italian title Cera una volta in America) is a 1984 crime film directed by Sergio Leone, starring Robert De Niro and James Woods. ... Sergio Leone (January 3, 1929 – April 30, 1989) was an Italian film director. ... Ennio Morricone (born November 10, 1928; sometimes also credited as Dan Savio or Leo Nichols) is an Italian composer especially noted for his film scores. ... Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid is a 1973 film directed by Sam Peckinpah and starring James Coburn and Kris Kristofferson. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... For other uses, see Knockin on Heavens Door (disambiguation). ... Peter Gunn was an American private eye television series which aired on the NBC and later ABC television networks from 1958 to 1961. ... Henry Mancini (April 16, 1924 – June 14, 1994), was an Academy Award winning American composer, conductor and arranger. ... This article is about the Pink Panther film series. ... Henry Mancini (April 16, 1924 – June 14, 1994), was an Academy Award winning American composer, conductor and arranger. ... Singles from Purple Rain Released: May 1984 Released: July 1984 Released: September 1984 Released: November 1984 Released: January 1985 Music from the Motion Picture Purple Rain (also called just Purple Rain) is a soundtrack album by Prince and The Revolution. ... The term prince, from the Latin root princeps, is used for a member of the highest ranks of the aristocracy or the nobility. ... For the video game based on the film, see Reservoir Dogs (video game). ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... Saturday Night Fever is a 1977 movie starring John Travolta as Tony Manero, a troubled Brooklyn youth whose weekend activities are dominated by visits to a Brooklyn discotheque. ... The Bee Gees were a singing trio of brothers — Barry, Robin, and Maurice Gibb — that became one of the most successful musical acts of all time. ... This article is about the music genre. ... Shaft is an album by Isaac Hayes and is the soundtrack album to the movie of the same name. ... For the American arctic explorer, see Isaac Israel Hayes Isaac Lee Hayes (born August 20, 1942, in Covington, Tennessee) is an American soul and funk singer, songwriter, musician, record producer, arranger, and actor best known as the voice of Chef on the Emmy-winning animated sitcom South Park. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Rodgers and Hammersteins The Sound of Music is a 1965 film directed by Robert Wise and starring Julie Andrews in the lead role. ... Rodgers (left) and Hammerstein (right), with Irving Berlin (middle) and Helen Tamiris, watching auditions at the St. ... Dame Julie Elizabeth Andrews, DBE (born Julia Elizabeth Wells[1] on 1 October 1935[2]) is an award-winning English actress, singer, author and cultural icon. ... Recent re-release of John Williams compositions for A New Hope, The Empire Strikes Back, and Return of the Jedi. ... Williams conducting the London Symphony Orchestra during the recording of the score for Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Blue Öyster Cult is an American rock band formed in New York in 1967 and still active in 2007. ... Superfly is a 1972 film soundtrack by Curtis Mayfield for the blaxploitation film Superfly. ... Curtis Mayfield (June 3, 1942 – December 26, 1999) was an American soul, funk and R&B singer, songwriter and guitarist best known for his anthemic music with The Impressions and composing the soundtrack to the blaxploitation film Superfly. ... For other uses, including related musical genres, see Funk (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Soul music (disambiguation). ... Thats The Way Of The World is a 1975 album by Earth, Wind & Fire. ... Earth, Wind & Fire is a world-renowned American band which fuses different genres of music, formed in Chicago, Illinois, in 1969 and is led and founded by Maurice White. ... The Thing is a 1982 science fiction film, directed by John Carpenter. ... Ennio Morricone (born November 10, 1928; sometimes also credited as Dan Savio or Leo Nichols) is an Italian composer especially noted for his film scores. ... Jerome David Kern (January 27, 1885 – November 11, 1945) was an American composer of popular music. ... Touch of Evil (1958) is considered one of the last examples of film noir in the genres classic era (from the early 1940s until the late 1950s). ... Henry Mancini (April 16, 1924 – June 14, 1994), was an Academy Award winning American composer, conductor and arranger. ... The Trainspotting Soundtracks are two soundtrack albums released following the film version of Irvine Welshs novel of the same name. ... This article is about the 1980 film. ... Country music, the first half of Billboards country and western music category, is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... Honky tonk was originally the name of a type of bar common throughout the southern United States, also Honkatonk or Honkey-tonk. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the 1973 film. ... Paul Giovanni (Born: 1933 Atlanta. ...

Bestselling soundtracks

  1. The Bodyguard (1992); 17 times platinum
  2. Saturday Night Fever (1977); 15 times platinum
  3. Purple Rain (1984); 13 times platinum
  4. Forrest Gump (1994); 12 times platinum
  5. (Tie) Dirty Dancing (1987); Titanic (1997); 11 times platinum
  6. The Lion King (1994); 10 times platinum
  7. (Tie) Top Gun (1986); Footloose (1984); 9 times platinum
  8. Grease (1978); 8 times platinum
  9. (Tie) O Brother, Where Art Thou? (2000); Waiting to Exhale (1995); 7 times platinum
  10. The Big Chill (1983); 6 times platinum
  11. Evita (1996); 5 times platinum

The Bodyguard is the soundtrack from the movie of the same name, released on November 8, 1992 on Arista Records and features six songs by Whitney Houston, as well as songs from various other noted artists of the time; the album was produced by Babyface. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... In the United States, the Recording Industry Association of America awards certification based on the number of albums and singles sold through retail and other ancillary markets. ... Saturday Night Fever: The Original Movie Sound Track was the soundtrack album from the blockbuster film Saturday Night Fever starring John Travolta. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Singles from Purple Rain Released: May 1984 Released: July 1984 Released: September 1984 Released: November 1984 Released: January 1985 Music from the Motion Picture Purple Rain (also called just Purple Rain) is a soundtrack album by Prince and The Revolution. ... This article is about the year. ... Forrest Gump is the soundtrack album based on the Academy Award- and Golden Globe-winning film, Forrest Gump, and contains such artists as Elvis Presley, Clarence Frogman Henry, Joan Baez, Aretha Franklin, Randy Newman and many more. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Dirty Dancing is the original soundtrack of the Motion Picture, Dirty Dancing. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Titanic is the soundtrack to the movie by the same name composed by James Horner. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Elton John chronology Elton Johns Duets (1993) The Lion King (1994) Made in England (1995) The Lion King: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack is the original motion picture soundtrack for Walt Disneys The Lion King. ... Top Gun is the soundtrack from the movie of the same name starring Tom Cruise, released in 1986 by Sony Music. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Footloose is the original soundtrack of the Paramount Motion Picture, Footloose. ... The Grease soundtrack is the original motion picture soundtrack from the 1978 film Grease. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... O Brother, Where Art Thou? is the soundtrack of music from the movie O Brother, Where Art Thou? an American film starring George Clooney. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Waiting to Exhale is a soundtrack for the film of the same name. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... The Big Chill is a 1983 soundtrack album of Motown classics featured in the film The Big Chill. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Evita, the soundtrack to the 1996 Motion Picture was released in two different formats; A 2-disc double album entitled Evita - The Motion Picture Music Soundtrack featured all the tracks from the film and a second release Evita - Music From The Motion Picture contained a selection of highlights from the... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ...

List of songs popularized by a movie

Some of these songs had been released before the movie, but had found little success only to become popular once featured in the movie. Other songs were released alongside the film or were briefly re-popularized some years after their initial peak. (This list does not include songs associated with a cinematic opera or musical.)


Most of these theme songs occur at least once during a climax during the movie, and are often played during the opening and/or closing credits; the close association between the highlights of a movie and a particular song, especially when the two are marketed together (as in a music video), means that songs can find new audiences. For example, Quentin Tarantino's use of "La La Means I Love You" and 1970s Philly soul group The Delfonics led to a renaissance in hipness for the band some fifteen years after their mainstream success ended. The theme music of a radio or television program is a melody closely associated with the show, and usually played during the title sequence and/or end credits. ... The climax (or turning point) of a narrative work is its point of highest tension or drama in which the solution is given. ... A music video is a short film or video that accompanies a complete piece of music, most commonly a song. ... Quentin Jerome Tarantino (born March 27, 1963) is a Palme dOr-winning American film director, actor, and an Oscar winning screenwriter. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... For the American indoor football team, see Philadelphia Soul. ... The Delfonics are a quintessential Philadelphia soul singing group, most popular in the late 1960s and early 1970s. ...

Blue Öyster Cult is an American rock band formed in New York in 1967 and still active in 2007. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Sir Elton Hercules[1] John CBE[2] (born Reginald Kenneth Dwight on 25 March 1947) is a five-time Grammy and one-time Academy Award-winning English pop/rock singer, composer and pianist. ... This article is about Disneys 1994 film. ... This article is about the musician. ... Titanic is a 1997 American romance film directed, written, produced and edited by James Cameron about the sinking of the RMS Titanic. ... Stealers Wheel Debut Album Stealers Wheel was a Scottish folk/rock band formed in Paisley, Scotland in 1972 by former school friends Joe Egan (born 16 April 1944, in Paisley, Scotland) and Gerry Rafferty (born 18 October 1947, Paisley, Scotland). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the video game based on the film, see Reservoir Dogs (video game). ... This article is about the surf guitarist. ... Pulp Fiction is a 1994 film by director Quentin Tarantino, who cowrote the film with Roger Avary. ... Lynyrd Skynyrd (pronounced lĕh-nérd skin-nérd) (pronounced ) is an iconic U.S. Southern rock band. ... Dazed and Confused is a 1993 American film written and directed by Richard Linklater. ... The Proclaimers are a Irish band composed of identical twins Charlie and Craig Reid. ... Benny & Joon is a 1993 movie about a tragic love between Sam (Johnny Depp) and Joon (Mary Stuart Masterson). ... Simple Minds is a rock band from Scotland, which had its greatest worldwide popularity from the mid-1980s to the early-1990s. ... This article is about the 1985 film. ... Whitney Elizabeth Houston (born August 9, 1963) is a six-time Grammy award winning, American R&B singer, soprano, pianist, actress, film producer, and former model. ... The Bodyguard is the soundtrack from the movie of the same name, released on November 8, 1992 on Arista Records and features six songs by Whitney Houston, as well as songs from various other noted artists of the time; the album was produced by Babyface. ... R. Kelly (born Robert Sylvester Kelly on January 8, 1967 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American R&B and pop singer, songwriter, record producer, and occasional rapper. ... This article is about the motion picture. ... March of the Volunteers (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is the national anthem of the Peoples Republic of China, written in the midst of the Second Sino-Japanese War (1937-1945) by the noted poet and playwright Tian Han with music composed by Nie Er. ... Movie poster for Sons and Daughters in a Time of Storm. ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that evokes and eulogizes the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognized either by a countrys government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ... Louis[1] Armstrong[2] (4 August 1901[3] – July 6, 1971), nicknamed Satchmo[4] and Pops, was an American jazz musician. ... Good Morning, Vietnam is a 1987 comedy/drama film set in Saigon during the Vietnam War, based on the career of Adrian Cronauer, a disc jockey on Armed Forces Radio Saigon (AFRS), who proves hugely popular with the troops serving in South Vietnam, but infuriates his superiors with what they... This article is about the American entertainer. ... Desperately Seeking Susan is a 1985 film directed by Susan Seidelman and starring Rosanna Arquette and Madonna. ... Shivaree performing live in London on 21st April 2005 Shivaree is a three-person American band formed in 1999 consisting of Ambrosia Parsley (vocals), Danny McGough (keyboard), and Duke McVinnie (guitar). ... This article lacks information on the importance of the subject matter. ... Kill Bill is the fourth film by writer-director Quentin Tarantino. ... The Shins are an indie rock group comprised of singer, songwriter and guitarist James Russell Mercer, keyboardist/guitarist/bassist Martin Crandall, bassist/guitarist Dave Hernandez, drummer Jesse Sandoval, and Eric Johnson of the Fruit Bats. ... Garden State is a 2004 film written by, directed by, and starring Zach Braff, with Natalie Portman, Peter Sarsgaard and co-starring Sir Ian Holm. ... Marshall Bruce Mathers III (born October 17, 1972), better known as Eminem or Slim Shady, is a Grammy and Academy Award-winning American rapper, record producer and actor from the Detroit, Michigan area. ... 8 Mile stars Eminem (Marshall Mathers) as the young white rapper Jimmy Smith Jr. ... The Time Warp is a Dance done by the actors and often the audience in the Movie Rocky Horror Picture show. ... The Rocky Horror Picture Show is a 1975 musical comedy film that parodies horror films. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... DKM redirects here. ... The Departed is an Academy-Award winning 2006 crime thriller film directed by Martin Scorsese, starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Matt Damon, Jack Nicholson and Mark Wahlberg. ... Cobra Starship is an Alternative Rock band created by Midtown bassist/lead vocalist Gabe Saporta as a side project. ... Snakes on a Plane is a cult high concept,[1] horror-thriller feature film[2] starring Samuel L. Jackson. ... Labelle (with the b written in small caps, while the spelling LaBelle exclusively refers to the stage surname of the groups lead vocalist, Patti LaBelle) was an American R&B/soul group, who successfully melded disco with funk and glam rock, resulting in such memorable songs as Lady Marmalade... Moulin Rouge is a 2001 Academy Award-winning jukebox musical film directed by Baz Luhrmann. ...

Classical Music In Film

Most of these classical works have enjoyed tremendous popularity following the release of a movie featuring them extensively:

In the Hall of the Mountain King (Norwegian: ) is a piece of orchestral music, Opus 23, composed by Edvard Grieg for Henrik Ibsens play Peer Gynt, which premiered in Oslo on February 24, 1876. ... M (original German title: M - Eine Stadt sucht einen Mörder, M - a city in search of a murderer) is a 1931 German film noir directed by Fritz Lang and written by Thea von Harbou. ... For the similarly named 1960 film, see The Rat Race. ... Tim Burtons Corpse Bride is a 2005 Academy Award-nominated stop-motion-animation film based loosely on a 19th century Russian-Jewish folktale version of an older Jewish story and set in a fictional Victorian era England. ... RV is a movie starring Robin Williams, Cheryl Hines, Jeff Daniels, JoJo, Kristin Chenoweth and Josh Hutcherson. ... Also sprach Zarathustra, op. ... The Blue Danube is the common English title of An der schönen blauen Donau op. ... The coversheet to Beethovens 5th Symphony. ... This article is about the composition. ... Cover of the original sheet music of the two piano version of Rhapsody in Blue. ... The Entertainer is a 1902 piano rag written by Scott Joplin and published by John Stark & Son. ... This article is about the 1973 film involving con artists. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Arthur Rackhams illustration to the Ride of the Valkyries The Ride of the Valkyries (German: Walkürenritt) is the popular term for the beginning of Act III of Die Walküre by Richard Wagner. ... Apocalypse Now is a 1979 Academy Award and Golden Globe winning American film set during the Vietnam War. ... The 1812 Overture (full title: Festival Overture The Year 1812 in E flat major, Op. ... Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (Russian Пётр Ильи́ч Чайко́вский, sometimes transliterated as Piotr, Anglicised as Peter Ilich), (May 7, 1840 – November 6, 1893 (N.S.); April 25, 1840 – October 25, 1893 (O.S.)) was a Russian composer of the Romantic era. ... This article is about the comic book series. ... Toccata and Fugue in D Minor is the name of two different pieces of music by Johann Sebastian Bach for the organ: BWV 538 and BWV 565. ... “Bach” redirects here. ... Fantasia is a 1940 motion picture, produced by Walt Disney and first released on November 13, 1940 in the United States. ...  20,000 Leagues Under the Sea is a 1954 film starring Kirk Douglas as Ned Land, James Mason as Captain Nemo, Paul Lukas as Professor Aronnax and Peter Lorre as Conseil. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Jacques Offenbach (20 June 1819 – 5 October 1880) was a French composer and cellist of the Romantic era with German-Jewish descent and one of the originators of the operetta form. ...

See also

What is an Original Cast Recording? The phrase is often misunderstood and misapplied. ... Music licensing is the licensed use of copyrighted music. ...

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