FACTOID # 12: It's not the government they hate: Washington DC has the highest number of hate crimes per capita in the US.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Film adaptation

Film adaptation is the transfer of a written work to a feature film. A reel of film, which predates digital cinematography. ...


Adaptation introduces complications in audience perception and aesthetics. The most obvious and common form of film adaptation is the use of a novel as the basis of a film, but film adaptation includes the use of non-fiction (including journalism), autobiography, comic book, scripture, plays, and even other films. From the earliest days of cinema, adaptation has been nearly as common as the development of original screenplays. A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended, generally fictional narrative in prose. ... Journalism is a discipline of collecting, analyzing, verifying, and presenting news regarding current events, trends, issues and people. ... Cover of An autobiography, from the Greek auton, self, bios, life and graphein, write, is a biography written by the subject or composed conjointly with a collaborative writer (styled as told to or with). The term dates from the late eighteenth century, but the form is much older. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Many religions and spiritual movements hold certain written texts (or series of spoken legends not traditionally written down) to be sacred. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A screenplay or script is a blueprint for producing a motion picture. ...

Contents

Novel adaptations and fidelity

Novels are frequently adapted for films. For the most part, these adaptations attempt either to appeal to an existing commercial audience (the adaptation of best sellers and the "prestige" adaptation of works) or to tap into the innovation and novelty of a less well known author. Inevitably, the question of "faithfulness" arises, and the more high profile the source novel, the more insistent are the questions of fidelity.


Elision and interpolation

Erich von Stroheim attempted a literal adaptation of Frank Norris's novel McTeague in 1924 with his film, Greed. The resulting film was over sixteen hours long. A cut of the film only eight hours long, then one running to four hours, appeared. Finally, the studio itself cut the film to around two hours, resulting in a finished product that was entirely incoherent. Since that time, few directors have been foolish enough to attempt to put everything in a novel into a film. Therefore, elision is nearly mandatory. Erich von Stroheim (September 22, 1885 – May 12, 1957) was a filmmaker and actor, noted for his arrogant Teutonic character parts. ... Benjamin Franklin Norris (March 5, 1870 - October 25, 1902) was an American novelist during the Progressive Era, the United States first important naturalist writer. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


In some cases, however, film adaptations will also interpolate scenes or invent characters. This is especially true when a novel is part of a literary saga. Incidents or quotes from later or earlier novels will be inserted into a single film. Additionally, and far more controversially, film makers will invent new characters or create stories that were not present in the source material at all. Given the anticipated audience for a film, the screenwriter, director, or movie studio may wish to increase character time or invent new characters. For example, William Kennedy's Pulitzer Prize winning novel, Ironweed, had a very small section with a prostitute named Helen. Because the movie studio anticipated a female audience for the film and had Meryl Streep for the role, Helen became a significant part of the film. However, characters are also sometimes invented to provide the narrative voice. When source novels have exposition or digressions from the author's own voice, a film adaptation may create a commenting, chorus-like character to provide what could not be filmed otherwise. (In the adaptation of John Fowles's The French Lieutenant's Woman, the director created a contemporary Englishman in a romance with a woman to offer up the ironic and scholarly voice that Fowles provided in the novel, and the film version of Laurence Sterne's novel, Tristram Shandy had the main actor speak in his own voice, as an actor, to emulate the narrator's voice in the novel.) A movie studio is a controlled environment for the making of a film. ... There are several notable people called William Kennedy: William Nassau Kennedy, second Mayor of Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... The gold medal awarded for Public Service in Journalism The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical compositions. ... Ironweed book cover Ironweed is a 1983 novel by William Kennedy. ... Meryl Streep (born Mary Louise Streep on June 22, 1949) is a two-time Academy Award winning American actress who has performed in movies, television and theater. ... In early tragedy, no parts were played by a single actor; because the actor left the stage often to change roles, the chorus was especially dominant. ... John Robert Fowles John Robert Fowles (March 31, 1926 – November 5, 2005) was an English novelist and essayist. ... The French Lieutenants Woman is a 1969 novel by John Fowles. ... Laurence Sterne Laurence Sterne (November 24, 1713 – March 18, 1768) was an Anglo-Irish novelist and clergyman. ... The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (or, more briefly, Tristram Shandy) is a novel by Laurence Sterne. ...


Interpretation as adaptation

There have been several nominees for non plus ultra of inventive adaptation, including the Roland Joffe adaptation of The Scarlet Letter with explicit sex between Hester Prynn and the minister and Native American attacks on Salem (changes introduced, according to Joffe, to increase the market and to make an entirely new morality tale out of the novel). At nearly the same time, Daniel Defoe's Moll Flanders was creatively adapted to make it a romance. A television mini-series of Gulliver's Travels changed the sexes of characters, made some vanish, and changed the character of Master Bates from a single 3 sentence obscene pun into a villain. The Charlie Kaufman and "Donald Kaufman" penned Adaptation. was an intentional satire and commentary on the process of film adaptation itself. All of these cases of "outrageous" or "unfaithful" adaptation were interpretations of the source work. Joffe argued that his changes were a recasting and revitalizing of Hawthorne's point. The creators of the Gulliver miniseries interpolated a sanity trial to reflect the ongoing scholarly debate over whether or not Gulliver himself is sane at the conclusion of Book IV. In these cases, adaptation is a form of criticism and recreation, as well as adaptation. Roland Joffé (born November 17, 1945) is a British film director who started out directing television. ... The Scarlet Letter published in 1850, is a Gothic American romance novel written by Nathaniel Hawthorne; generally considered to be his masterpiece. ... Daniel Defoe Daniel Defoe (1660 [?] â€“ April 1731) was an English writer, journalist and spy, who gained enduring fame for his novel Robinson Crusoe. ... The Fortunes and Misfortunes of the Famous Moll Flanders is a 1722 novel by Daniel Defoe. ... First Edition of Gullivers Travels Gullivers Travels (1726, amended 1735), officially Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World, is a novel by Jonathan Swift that is both a satire on human nature and a parody of the travellers tales literary sub-genre. ... Charles Stuart Kaufman (born September 20, 1958) is an Academy Award winning American screenwriter, identified by Premiere magazine as one of the 100 most powerful people in Hollywood. ... Adaptation. ... Nathaniel Hawthorne (born Nathaniel Hathorne; July 4, 1804 - May 19, 1864) was a 19th century American novelist and short story writer. ...


Change in adaptation is essential and practically unavoidable, mandated both by the constraints of time and medium, but how much is always a balance. Some film theorists have argued that a director should be entirely unconcerned with the source, as a novel is a novel, while a film is a film, and the two works of art must be seen as separate entities. Since a transcription of a novel into film is impossible, even holding up a goal of "accuracy" is absurd. Others argue that what a film adaptation does is change to fit (literally, adapt), and the film must be accurate to either the effect (aesthetics) of a novel or the theme of the novel or the message of the novel and that the film maker must introduce changes where necessary to fit the demands of time and to maximize faithfulness along one of these axes.


Theatrical adaptation

In addition to adaptation from novels, films frequently use plays as their sources. William Shakespeare has been called the most popular screenwriter in Hollywood. Not only are there film versions of all of Shakespeare's plays, but there are multiple versions of many of them, and there are films adapted from Shakespeare's plays very loosely (such as West Side Story, Kiss Me, Kate, O, and 10 Things I Hate about You, as well as Akira Kurosawa's adaptations in Throne of Blood and Ran). Similarly, hit Broadway plays are frequently adapted, whether from musicals or dramas. On the one hand, theatrical adaptation does not involve as many interpolations or elisions as novel adaptation, but, on the other, the demands of scenery and possibilities of motion frequently entail changes from one medium to the other. Film critics will often mention if an adapted play has a static camera or emulates a proscenium arch. Laurence Olivier consciously imitated the arch with his Henry V (1944), having the camera begin to move and to use color stock after the prologue, indicating the passage from physical to imaginative space. Sometimes, the adaptive process can continue after one translation. Mel Brooks's The Producers was a film that was adapted into a Broadway musical and then adapted again into a film. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Greetings from Hollywood Hollywood is a district of the city of Los Angeles, California, U.S.A., that extends from Vermont Avenue on the east to just beyond Laurel Canyon Boulevard above Sunset and Crescent Heights Boulevards on the west; the north to south boundary east of La Brea Avenue... West Side Story is a 1961 film directed by Robert Wise and Jerome Robbins. ... Kiss Me, Kate is a stage musical by Samuel and Bella Spewack (book) and Cole Porter (music and lyrics) that ran for 1,077 performances and was first performed in New York on December 30, 1948. ... O is a 2001 teen film version of William Shakespeares Othello. ... 10 Things I Hate about You is a 1999 American romantic comedy film starring Julia Stiles and Heath Ledger, and directed by Gil Junger. ... Akira Kurosawa , 23 March 1910—6 September 1998) was a prominent Japanese film director, film producer, and screenwriter. ... Throne of Blood (1957), original title Kumonosu-jō (蜘蛛巣城, Spider Web Castle), is a film by Akira Kurosawa, which transposes the plot of William Shakespeare’s play Macbeth to medieval Japan, shot in black and white and is arguably one of the finest of its time. ... Ran (Japanese: , chaos, wretchedness) is a 1985 film written and directed by Japanese filmmaker Akira Kurosawa. ... Broadway theatre[1] is often considered the highest professional form of theatre in the United States. ... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... A proscenium arch is a square frame around a raised stage area in traditional theatres. ... Laurence Kerr Olivier, Baron Olivier, OM (22 May 1907–11 July 1989) was an Academy Award, Golden Globe, BAFTA and four-time Emmy winning English actor, director, and producer. ... Henry V is a 1944 film adaptation of William Shakespeares play Henry V. The on-screen title is The Chronicle History of King Henry the Fift with His Battell Fought at Agincourt in France (the title of the 1600 quarto edition of the play). ... A prologue (Greek πρόλογος, from προ~, pro~ - fore~, and lógos, word), or rarely prolog, is a prefatory piece of writing, usually composed to introduce a drama. ... Mel Brooks (born Melvin Kaminsky on June 28, 1926) is an Academy Award-winning American actor, writer, director and producer best known as a creator of broad film farces and comedy parodies or, as he says, spoofs. // Born Melvin Kaminsky in Brooklyn, New York to Russian-Jewish parents Maximillian Kaminsky...


Television and other theatrical adaptation

Feature films are occasionally created as a full and (usually) uncensored version of a television series or television segments. In these cases, the film will either offer a longer storyline than the usual television program's format or will offer a greater set of production values. In the adaptation of The X Files to film, for example, greater effects and a longer plotline were involved. Additionally, adaptations of television shows will offer the viewer the opportunity to see the television show's characters without broadcast restrictions. These additions (nudity, profanity, explicit drug use, explicit violence) are rarely a featured adaptive addition. Because the film makers are adapting established characters with expected behaviors, introducing dramatically non-broadcast elements would alienate an audience, and therefore nudity, drug use, and violence for the main characters may be increased from broadcast standards but is unlikely to be a significant film element. Instead, films will try to offer a "real" story, as if commercial television were inherently censored for complexity. Some adaptations of television shows are nostalgic and usually ironic. Films about television shows of the audience's childhood (e.g. Scooby-Doo) play up television conventions and will sometimes exploit the distinction between movie and television possibilities for comedic effect. X-Files intro from first 8 seasons The X-Files was a popular 1990s American science fiction television series created by Chris Carter. ... Scooby-Doo is a 2002 live-action film, based on the popular Hanna-Barbera Saturday morning cartoon of the same name. ...


At the same time, some theatrically released films are adaptations of television mini-series events. When national film boards and state controlled television networks co-exist, film makers can sometimes create very long films for television that they may adapt solely for time for theatrical release. Both Ingmar Bergman (notably with Fanny and Alexander, but with other films as well) and Lars von Trier have created long television films that they then recut for international distribution. A miniseries, in a serial storytelling medium, is a production which tells a story in a limited number of episodes. ... Ingmar Bergman   (IPA: in Swedish) (born July 14, 1918) is a Swedish stage and film director who is one of the key film auteurs of the second half of the twentieth century. ... Fanny och Alexander is a 1982 Swedish film written and directed by Ingmar Bergman. ... Lars von Trier (born Lars Trier, April 30, 1956) is a Danish film director closely associated with the Dogme95 collective, calling for a return to plausible stories in filmmaking and a move away from artifice and towards technical minimalism. ...


Even segments of television shows have been adapted into feature films. The American television variety show Saturday Night Live has been the origin of a number of films, beginning with The Blues Brothers, which began as a one-off performance by Dan Aykroyd and John Belushi. The most recent of these Saturday Night Live originated films is a case of double television origin: Fat Albert, which began with an impression of another television show based on the comedy routine of Bill Cosby. Rowan Atkinson has starred in two British films that originated on television: Bean and Johnny English. Saturday Night Live (SNL) is a weekly late night 90-minute American comedy-variety show based in New York City which has been broadcast by NBC on Saturday nights since October 11, 1975. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Daniel Edward Aykroyd CM (born July 1, 1952) is an Academy Award-nominated Canadian comedian, actor, screenwriter and musician. ... John Adam Belushi (January 24, 1949 – March 5, 1982) was an Emmy award winning American actor, comedian and singer most notable for his work on Saturday Night Live, National Lampoons Animal House and The Blues Brothers. ... Fat Albert is a 2004 live-action/animated film based on the Filmation animated series Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids. ... William Henry Bill Cosby, Jr. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Green beans Bean is a common name for large plant seeds of several genera of Fabaceae (formerly Leguminosae) used for food or feed. ... Johnny English (2003) is a comic movie parodying the James Bond secret agent genre, starring Rowan Atkinson as the incompetent British spy of the title, with John Malkovich, Natalie Imbruglia and Ben Miller, and featuring a unique car chase. ...


Radio narratives have also provided the basis of film adaptation. The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, for example, began as a radio series for the BBC and then became a novel which was adapted to film. Mr. Magoo existed as a radio character skit before it became a cartoon short series for theatrical release. In the heyday of radio, radio segments, like television segments today, translated to film on several occasions, usually as shorts. The cover of the first novel in the Hitchhikers series, from a late 1990s printing. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Mr. ... A cartoon is any of several forms of illustrations, with varied meanings that evolved from one to another. ...


Comic book adaptation

Comic book characters, particularly superheroes, have long been adaptated into film, beginning in the 1940s with Saturday movie serials aimed at children. Superman: The Movie (1978) and Batman (1989) are two later successful movie adaptations of famous comic book characters. In the early 2000s, blockbusters such as X-Men (2000), Spider-Man (2002) and Batman Begins (2005) have led to dozens of superhero films. The success of these films has also led to other comic books not necessarily about superheroes being adapted for the big screen, such as Ghost World (2001), American Splendor (2003) and Sin City (2005). A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... This article may contain original research or unverified claims. ... Christopher Reeve as the Man of Steel, Superman Superman, also known as Superman: The Movie, is a 1978 Warner Bros. ... Batman is an American 1989 Academy Award-winning superhero film based on the Batman character created by Bob Kane and Bill Finger and appearing in DC Comics. ... X-Men is a 2000 American action movie, featuring a group of comic book superheroes called the X-Men. ... Spider-Man is a superhero film released in 2002 and directed by Sam Raimi. ... Batman Begins is a 2005 superhero film based on the fictional DC Comics character Batman. ... Ghost World is a 2001 film by Terry Zwigoff, based on a graphic novel (comic book) by Daniel Clowes, also titled Ghost World. ... American Splendor is a film adaptation of the comic book series of the same name by Harvey Pekar. ... Sin City is a 2005 neo-noir anthology film based on the graphic novel series of the same name, directed by Frank Miller and Robert Rodriguez and with Special Guest Director Quentin Tarantino. ...


The adaptation process for comics is different from that of novels. Many successful comic book series last for several decades and have featured several variations of the characters in that time. Films based on such series usually try to capture the back story and “spirit” of the character instead of adapting a particular storyline. Occasionally aspects of the characters and their origins are simplified or modernized.


Self-contained graphic novels, many of which do not feature superheroes, can be adapted more directly, such as in the case of Road to Perdition (2002) and V for Vendetta (2006). In particular, Robert Rodriguez did not use a screenplay for Sin City but utilized actual panels from writer/artist Frank Miller's series as storyboards to create what Rodriguez regards as a "translation" rather than an adaptation. Sabre (1978), one of the first graphic novels. ... Road to Perdition is a graphic novel written by Max Allan Collins and illustrated by Richard Piers Rayner that was made into a motion picture of the same name in 2002. ... V for Vendetta is a 2006 action-thriller film set in London, England in a dystopian near future. ... Robert Anthony Rodriguez (born June 20, 1968) is an American film director. ... A screenplay or script is a blueprint for producing a motion picture. ... Frank Miller (born January 27, 1957 in Olney, Maryland) is an American writer, artist and film director best known for his film noir-style comic book stories. ... Cover of Sin City shows Marv walking through the rain. ... Storyboard for a James Bond Movie Storyboards are graphic organizers such as a series of illustrations or images displayed in sequence for the purpose of previsualizing a motion graphic or interactive media sequence. ...


Furthermore, some films based on long-running franchises use particular storylines from the franchise as a basis for a plot. The second X-Men film was loosely based on the graphic novel X-Men: God Loves, Man Kills and the third film on the storyline Dark Phoenix Saga. This page is about the 2003 movie X2; see X2 (disambiguation) for other meanings. ... Dark Phoenix on the cover of the Dark Phoenix TPB; art originally from Uncanny X-Men #135, by John Byrne. ...


See also: Superhero film, List of films based on American comic books Adventures of Captain Marvel, the first superhero film. ... It has been suggested that List of graphic novels adapted into television or film be merged into this article or section. ...


Adaptations from other sources

Documentary films have been made from reportage, as have dramatic films (e.g. All the President's Men). Some films have been made based on photographs (e.g. Pretty Baby, directed by Louis Malle), and movies have adapted movies (e.g. Twelve Monkeys deriving from La Jetée). Many films have been made from epic poetry. Homer's works have been adapted multiple times in several nations. Finally, both Greek mythology and the Bible have been adapted frequently. In these cases, the audience already knows the story well, and so the adaptation will de-emphasize elements of suspense and concentrate instead on detail and phrasing. The specifics of the acting take precedence over cinematic techniques. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Cover of 2005 printing All the Presidents Men is a 1974 non-fiction book by Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward, the two journalists investigating the Watergate first break-in and ensuing Watergate scandal for the Washington Post. ... Pretty Baby is the title of two songs, and of a motion picture named after the better known of the songs. ... Louis Malle (October 30, 1932 – November 23, 1995) was a French film director. ... La Jetée (1962) (literally The Jetty) 28-minute science fiction film in black and white by Chris Marker. ... The epic is a broadly defined genre of poetry, and one of the major forms of narrative literature. ... Homer (Greek HómÄ“ros) was a legendary early Greek poet and aoidos (singer) traditionally credited with the composition of the Iliad and the Odyssey. ... The Oricoli bust of Zeus, King of the Gods, in the collection of the Vatican Museum. ... The word Bible refers to the canonical collections of sacred writings of Judaism and Christianity. ... Acting is the work of an actor or actress, a person in theatre, film, or any other storytelling medium who tells the story by portraying a character and, usually, speaking or singing the written text or play. ...


An Inconvenient Truth is Al Gore's documentary film about climate change. It is a film adaptation of a Keynote multimedia presentation. An Inconvenient Truth book cover An Inconvenient Truth is a documentary film about climate change, specifically global warming, directed by Davis Guggenheim and starring former United States Vice President Al Gore. ... Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400,000 years Climate change refers to the variation in the Earths global climate or in regional climates over time. ... For the text editor called Keynote, see Keynote (Tranglos). ... Street preacher in Covent Garden using a presentation style Presentation is the process of presenting the content of a topic to an audience. ...


Reverse adaptation

Popular films have been adapted into both novels and plays. Many movie studios commission novelizations of their popular titles or sell the rights to their titles to publishing houses. These novelized films will frequently be written on assignment (i.e. hack writing), and will sometimes be written by authors who have only an early script as their source. Consequently, novelizations are quite often changed from the films as they appear in theaters. These differences are not, properly speaking, adaptations, but rather accidents of production. Further, novelization authors can frequently use the extended time available on the printed page to build up characters and incidents for commercial reasons (e.g. to market a card or computer game, to promote the publisher's "saga" of novels, or to create continuity between films in a series); these are introductions of alien matter rather than adaptations necessitated by form. There have been, however, a few instances of novelists who have worked from their own screenplays to create novels at nearly the same time as a film. Both Arthur C. Clarke, with 2001: A Space Odyssey, and Graham Greene, with The Third Man, have worked from their own film ideas to a novel form (although it is worth noting that the novel version of The Third Man was written more to aid in the development of the screenplay than for the purposes of being released as a novel, and that 2001's novelization was written in parallel with the screenplay). Both John Sayles and Ingmar Bergman write their film ideas as novels before they begin producing them as films, although neither director has allowed these prose treatments to be published. A novelization (or novelisation in British English) is a work of fiction that is written based on some other media story form rather than as an original work. ... Sir Arthur Charles Clarke (born December 16, 1917) is a British author and inventor, most famous for his science-fiction novel 2001: A Space Odyssey, and for collaborating with director Stanley Kubrick on the film of the same name. ... Graham Greene Henry Graham Greene, OM, CH (October 2, 1904 – April 3, 1991) was a prolific English novelist, playwright, short story writer, travel writer and critic whose works explore the ambivalent moral and political issues of the modern world. ... The Third Man (1949) is a British film noir directed by Carol Reed. ... Photo of John Sayles by Robert Birnbaum John Thomas Sayles (born September 28, 1950 in Schenectady, New York) is a fiercely independent American film director and writer who frequently takes a small part in his own and other indie films. ... Ingmar Bergman   (IPA: in Swedish) (born July 14, 1918) is a Swedish stage and film director who is one of the key film auteurs of the second half of the twentieth century. ...


Finally, films have inspired and been adapted into plays. John Waters's films have been successfully mounted as plays; both Hairspray and Cry Baby have been adapted, and other films have spurred subsequent theatrical adaptations. The most recent incidence of this is Spamalot, which is a Broadway play based on Monty Python films. In a rare case of a film being adapted from a stage musical adaptation of a film, in 2005 the film adaptation of the stage musical based on Mel Brook's classic comedy film The Producers was released. John Waters (born April 22, 1946, Baltimore, Maryland) is an American filmmaker, who became well known in the early 1970s for his intentionally transgressive comedies. ... Monty Python, or The Pythons, is the collective name of the creators of Monty Pythons Flying Circus, a British television comedy sketch show that first aired on the BBC on 5 October 1969. ... The Producers is a 1968 feature-length comedy film set in New York City, in which two con men (Bialystock and Bloom) attempt to cheat theatre angels (investors) out of their investment money. ...


Other adaptative processes

Although not truly a case of artistic adaptation, there have been rare examples of films inspiring or creating religions, such as the new emphasis on Jedi religion coming from the Star Wars films, which themselves adapted other films (notably The Hidden Fortress). Also, films have inspired and been adapted into journalism (e.g. The Thin Blue Line inspired journalistic investigations resulting in the freeing of a death row inmate, and Harlan County, USA inspired investigative reports that aided in labor conflict resolution in the US). The Jedi census phenomenon was a grassroots movement in 2001 for citizens in a few English-speaking countries to record their religion as Jedi or Jedi Knight (after the fictitious religious order from the Star Wars films) on the national census, apparently as a very large-scale practical joke. ... This article is about the series. ... The Hidden Fortress (Japanese: 隠し砦の三悪人, Kakushi toride no san akunin) is a 1958 film by Akira Kurosawa and starring Toshiro Mifune as General Rokurota Makabe and Misa Uehara as Princess Yuki. ... The Thin Blue Line is a 1988 documentary film concerning the murder of a Texas police officer who had stopped a car for a routine traffic citation. ... Harlan County, USA is a 1976 documentary film documenting the efforts of 180 coal-miners on strike in Harlan County, Kentucky in 1974. ...


References

  • Eisenstein, Sergei. "Dickens, Griffith, and the Film Today." Film Form Dennis Dobson, trans. 1951.

See also

Remake In film, a remake is a newer version of a previously released film or a newer version of the source (play, novel, story, etc. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Film Adaptations of Jane Austen's Novels (4527 words)
When towards the end of her essay Roberts turns to discuss the "sensationalism" of the film's approach and remarks that it camps up and sexualizes the novel grotesquely (26), she concludes (as if she is puzzled) that the film is "an interesting failure" because it doesn't ethically examine but just exploits the viewer's sexual longing.
The problem here is that careful scrutiny of sequences in the film reveals the camera has been even-handed, and the viewer gazes at Jennifer Ehle alone or watching others as often as she or he gazes at Colin Firth alone or watching others.
The actors in the earlier movie are filmed as if the landscape were a stage in a play, and the camera acts simply as a still eye which places the viewer in the position of someone in a theatre audience.
Hamlet (1948 film) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (400 words)
Hamlet is a 1948 film adaptation of the William Shakespeare play Hamlet.
In the past, the 1948 film was often considered to be the definitive cinematic rendition of "Hamlet".
In 1996, Kenneth Branagh's film version of the complete "Hamlet" brought out the faults of the Olivier "Hamlet" even more sharply, by including everything that Olivier had omitted, and by having what many say is a better supporting cast than the 1948 film.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m