FACTOID # 18: Alaska spends more money per capita on elementary and secondary education than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > File copying

File copying is creation of a new file which has the same content as an existing file. A file in a computer system is a stream (sequence) of bits stored as a single unit, typically in a file system on disk or magnetic tape. ...


All operating systems include file copying in the user interface, like cp in Unix and copy in MS-DOS; operating systems with GUIs usually provide copy-and-paste or drag-and-drop methods of file copying.  File managers, too, provide an easy way of copying files. In computing, an operating system (OS) is the system software responsible for the direct control and management of hardware and basic system operations. ... Unix or UNIX is a computer operating system originally developed in the 1960s and 1970s by a group of AT&T Bell Labs employees including Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie, and Douglas McIlroy. ... Microsofts disk operating system, MS-DOS, was Microsofts implementation of DOS, which was the first popular operating system for the IBM PC, and until recently, was widely used on the PC compatible platform. ... Gui is a French form of the male name Guy. ... This page is about computer text editing. ... Drag-and-drop refers to the act of (or support for the act of) clicking on a virtual object and dragging it to, or onto, another virtual object. ... A file manager is a software tool that provides a user interface to work with computer files. ...


Internally, however, while some systems have specialized APIs for copying files (like CopyFile and CopyFileEx in Windows API), others (like Unix and MS-DOS) fall back to simply reading the contents of the old file and writing it to the new file. This makes little difference with local files, but provides an interesting situation when both the source and target files are located on a remote file server.  Operating systems with specialized file copying APIs are usually able to tell the server to perform the copying locally, without sending file contents over the network, thus greatly improving performance.  Those systems that have no comparable APIs, however, have to read the file contents over the network, and then to send them back, again over the network.  Sometimes remote file copying is performed with a specialized command, like ncopy in MS-DOS clients for Novell NetWare. API with 3 clients, using the Unified Modeling Language notation An application programming interface (API) is a set of definitions of the ways one piece of computer software communicates with another. ... Windows API is a set of APIs (application programming interfaces) available in the Microsoft Windows operating systems. ... Unix or UNIX is a computer operating system originally developed in the 1960s and 1970s by a group of AT&T Bell Labs employees including Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie, and Douglas McIlroy. ... Microsofts disk operating system, MS-DOS, was Microsofts implementation of DOS, which was the first popular operating system for the IBM PC, and until recently, was widely used on the PC compatible platform. ... In telecommunication, the term file server has the following meanings: A high-capacity disk storage device or a computer that each computer on a network can use or access and retrieve files that can be shared among attached computers. ... NetWare is a network operating system and the set of network protocols it uses to talk to client machines on the network. ...


An even more complicated situation arises when one needs to copy files between two remote servers.  The simple way is to read data from one server, and then to write them to the second server.  The tricky way is to tell both servers to exchange data directly (and this is hardly implemented anywhere).


 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m