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Encyclopedia > Field gun

A field gun is an artillery piece. Historically, artillery refers to any engine used for the discharge of projectiles during war. ...


Originally the term referred to smaller cannons that could be carried into combat by a moving field army, and moved about the field of battle. This was as opposed to siege cannon or mortars which were too large to be moved quickly, and would be used only in a prolonged siege. A small cast-iron cannon on a carriage A cannon is any large tubular firearm designed to fire a heavy projectile over a considerable distance. ... For the Boston area punk band see Siege (band). ...


Perhaps the most famous use of the field gun in terms of advanced tactics was Napoleon's use of very large wheels on the guns that allowed them to be moved quickly even during a battle. By moving the guns from point to point during the battle, enemy formations could be broken up to be handled by the infantry wherever they were massing, dramatically increasing the overall effectiveness of the infantry. For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


As the evolution of artillery continued, almost all guns of any size became capable of being moved at some speed. With few exceptions, even the largest siege weapons had become mobile by road or rail by the start of World War I, and evolution after that point tended to be towards smaller weapons with increased mobility. Although the Germans fielded a number of super-heavy guns (for no apparent good reason) in World War II, even these were rail or caterpillar-track mobile. World War I was primarily a European conflict with many facets: immense human sacrifice, stalemate trench warfare, and the use of new, devastating weapons - tanks, aircraft, machineguns, and poison gas. ... World War II was a truly global conflict with many facets: immense human suffering, fierce indoctrinations, and the use of new, extremely devastating weapons like the atom bomb World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a mid-20th-century conflict that engulfed much of the globe...


In British use, a Field Gun was anything up to around 4.5 inches in calibre -- larger guns were Medium and the largest of all Heavy. Their largest gun (as opposed to howitzer) was the 5.5 inch (140 mm), reaching about 16,000 yards. Loading a WW1 British 15 in (381 mm) howitzer 155 mm M198 Howitzer A howitzer or hauwitzer is a type of field artillery. ...


Since about the start of WWII, the term has been applied to long-range artillery pieces that fire at a low angle, as opposed to howitzers which tend to fire at higher angles. By the later stages of WWII almost all artillery was in the form of howitzers of 105 mm to 155 mm, and the only common field gun of the era was the US 155 mm Long Tom (a development of a French WWI weapon). The US Army tried the long-range gun again in the 1960s with a 175 mm gun, but this was a failure, and after a rash of cracked barrels the gun was removed from service. Loading a WW1 British 15 in (381 mm) howitzer 155 mm M198 Howitzer A howitzer or hauwitzer is a type of field artillery. ... US Army Seal The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ...


Today the gun finds itself in an area that seems to be gone for good. The class of small and highly mobile artillery has been filled with increasing capacity by the man-portable mortar, which replaced almost every artillery piece smaller than 105 mm. Howitzers fill the middle ground, with the world rapidly standardizing on the 155mm NATO or 152 mm former USSR standards. The need for a long-range weapon is filled by rocket artillery, or aircraft. US soldier firing an M224 60-mm mortar. ... The NATO flag NATO 2002 Summit in Prague The North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO), sometimes called North Atlantic Alliance, Atlantic Alliance or the Western Alliance, is an international organisation for defence collaboration established in 1949, in support of the North Atlantic Treaty signed in Washington, D.C., on April 4... A Redstone rocket, part of the Mercury program A rocket is a vehicle, missile or aircraft which obtains thrust by the reaction to the ejection of fast moving exhaust gas from within a rocket engine. ... Military aircraft are airplanes used in warfare. ...



See also Field gun competition The Royal Navy Field Gun Competition was held annually at the Royal Tournament in London until 1999. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Field gun (397 words)
Perhaps the most famous use of the field gun in terms of advanced tactics was Napoleon's use of very large wheels on the guns that allowed them to be moved quickly even during a battle.
By moving the guns from point to point during the battle, enemy formations that were massing could be broken up to be handled by the infantry.
The US Army tried the long-range gun again in the 1960s with a 175mm gun, but this was a failure, and after a rash of cracked barrels the gun was removed from service.
Home Page (125 words)
In 2001 the 'field gun run' was resurrected by a crew and staff comprising of ex field gunners and civilians who have proved a civilian crew have the ability to perform a field gun run.
The present crew and staff are committed to achieving the aim of competitive field gun runs by 2005.
Field gun is hard work and is also still the toughest team event in the world.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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