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Encyclopedia > Fiefdom
Fief depiction in a book of hours
Fief depiction in a book of hours

Under the system of feudalism, a fiefdom, fief, feud, feoff, or fee, often consisted of inheritable lands or revenue-producing property granted by a liege lord, generally to a vassal, in return for a form of allegiance, originally to give him the means to fulfill his military duties when called upon. However anything of value could be held in fief, such as an office, a right of exploitation (e.g., hunting, fishing) or any other type of revenue, rather than the land it comes from. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 449 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (595 × 794 pixel, file size: 130 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Faithful reproductions of two-dimensional original works cannot attract copyright in the U.S. according to the rule in Bridgeman Art Library v. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 449 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (595 × 794 pixel, file size: 130 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Faithful reproductions of two-dimensional original works cannot attract copyright in the U.S. according to the rule in Bridgeman Art Library v. ... A illuminated page from the Très Riches Heures showing the day for exchanging gifts from the month of January A book of hours from the late 1470s. ... Roland pledges his fealty to Charlemagne; from a manuscript of a chanson de geste Feudalism, a term first used in the early modern period (17th century), in its most classic sense refers to a Medieval European political system comprised of a set of reciprocal legal and military obligations among the... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Allegiance is a duty of fidelity said to be owed by a subject or a citizen to his state or sovereign. ... Lordship redirects here. ...


Derogatory Usage

Fiefdomism can refer to behavior of bureaucrats or small time politicians when information or programs are isolated and jealously guarded from other bureaucrats or small time politicians in order to preserve their power at the expense of making government worse.


See also

Nobility is a traditional hereditary status (see hereditary titles) that exists today in many countries (mainly present or former monarchies). ... Serf redirects here. ... The system of appanage has greatly influenced the territorial construction of France and explains the flag of many provinces of France. ... Knight-service, the dominant and distinctive tenure of land under the feudal system. ...

Sources and references

  • RoyalArk- see each present country

  Results from FactBites:
 
Fiefdom - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (589 words)
Under the system of feudalism, a fiefdom, fief, feud or fee, often consisted of heritable lands or revenue-producing property granted by a liege lord in return for a form of allegiance, originally often to give him the means to fulfill his military duties when called upon.
However anything of value could be held in fief, such as an office, a right of exploitation (e.g., hunting, fishing) or a revenue rather than the land it comes from.
Fiefdom usually required the vassal to obey conditions of customary and specified homage and fealty.
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