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Encyclopedia > Fictional universe

A fictional universe is an imaginary world that serves as the setting or backdrop for one or (more commonly) multiple works of fiction or translatable non-fiction. An imaginary world is a setting, place or event or scenario at variance with objective reality, ranging from the voluntary suspension of disbelief of fictional universes and the socially constructed consensus reality of the Social Imaginary, to alternate realities resulting from disinformation, misinformation or imaginative speculation, and the subjective universe... Setting is a term in literature and drama usually referring to the time and location in which a story takes place. ... Theatrical scenery Filming location This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... // Fiction (from the Latin fingere, to form, create) is the genre of imaginative prose literature, including novels and short stories. ... Non-fiction is an account or representation of a subject which is presented as fact. ...


It can be argued that every work of fiction generates a world of its own; Robert A. Heinlein coined the neologism ficton to refer to such a world. Most fictions are, naturally, similar to our own world; a fictional universe is a ficton possessing its own separate but broadly consistent history, geography, or physics. It generally consists of a time and place that invoke a sense of a distinct world, one which is unique to the content and context of the tales that it is used to tell. Robert Anson Heinlein (July 7, 1907 – May 8, 1988) was one of the most popular, influential, and controversial authors of hard science fiction. ... This article cites very few or no references or sources. ... A ficton is a fictional setting created by writing any fictional story or series of stories. ...

Contents

Properties

Fictional universes are most common in, but not exclusive to, the science fiction and fantasy genres. Many universes written in one or both of these genres feature physical and metaphysical laws different from our own that allow for magical, psychic and various other types of paranormal phenomena, or the hypothesis may be based in a parallel universe which have some scientific theoretical speculation like multiverse. Although these laws may not be completely internally consistent, they do allow the author to provide some textual explanation for how their imagined world differs from our own. Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Smaug in his lair: an illustration for the fantasy The Hobbit Fantasy is a genre of art that uses magic and other supernatural forms as a primary element of plot, theme, or setting. ... Look up genre in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The first few hydrogen atom electron orbitals shown as cross-sections with color-coded probability density Physics (Greek: (phúsis), nature and (phusiké), knowledge of nature) is the branch of science concerned with the discovery and characterization of universal laws which govern matter, energy, space, and time. ... Plato and Aristotle (right), by Raphael (Stanza della Segnatura, Rome). ... The Sorceress by John William Waterhouse Magic and sorcery are the influencing of events, objects, people and physical phenomena by mystical, paranormal or supernatural means. ... Psychic, from the Greek psychikos meaning mental, of the soul (in turn derived from psyche meaning soul, mind), is a term used to describe phenomena or abilities that are said to originate from the brain but which transcend its confines. ... // Paranormal is an umbrella term used to describe a wide variety of reported anomalous phenomena. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Parallel universe or alternate reality in science fiction and fantasy is a self-contained separate reality coexisting with our own. ... A multiverse (or meta-universe) is the hypothetical set of multiple possible universes (including our universe) that together comprise all of physical reality. ... An author is any person(s) or entity(s) that originates and assumes responsibility for an expression or communication. ...


A common method for illustrating fictional universes is for the creator to focus the majority of his or her attention on one small area, revealing the larger world through hints or exposition. Nineteen Eighty-Four takes place almost entirely in the city of London, but reveals the full extent of its totalitarian world through the reading of Goldstein's banned book and the memories of its protagonists. Most of the television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer is set in a single Californian city, though the larger world, the "Buffyverse", spans the entire world and indeed many separate universes and dimensions. Most of the action in the Harry Potter series occurs in and around a single school, though its Wizarding world comprises an entire distinct global society. This article is about the Orwell novel. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Television series redirects here. ... Buffy the Vampire Slayer is an Emmy and Golden Globe-nominated American cult television series that initially aired from March 10, 1997 until May 20, 2003. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Look up city, City in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Buffyverse is a term coined by fans of Joss Whedons first two television shows to refer to the shared fictional universe in which they are set. ... This article is about the Harry Potter series of novels. ... Students in Rome, Italy. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


On the other hand, fictional universes can also comprise multitudes of settings, thousands of characters and hundreds of interconnected plots. This is particularly true in media, such as television or comic books, where multiple authors can compose works in the same universe simultaneously. Many fictional universes, such as Star Trek, have actually outlived their creators. The current Star Trek franchise logo Star Trek is an American science fiction entertainment series and media franchise. ...


It is difficult to determine what actually constitutes a "fictional universe." Sir Thomas More's Utopia is one of the earliest examples of a cohesive imaginary world with its own rules and functional concepts, but it comprises only one small island. Some, like J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings, are global in scope, and some, like Star Trek and Star Wars are galactic or even intergalactic. A fictional universe may even concern itself with more than one interconnected universe through theoretically viable devices such as "parallel worlds" or universes, and a series of interconnected universes is called a multiverse. Such multiverses have been featured prominently in science fiction since at least the mid-20th century, notably in the classic Star Trek episode, "Mirror, Mirror", which introduced the mirror universe in which the crew of the Starship Enterprise were brutal, rather than civilized, and in the mid-1980s comic book series, Crisis on Infinite Earths, in which countless parallel universes were destroyed. The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, when considered as all 5 books together, flits back and forth between different universes, or perhaps it is more accurate to say, flits through different timelines and different dimensions involving different states of existence for the characters and for the earth itself. Portrait of Sir Thomas More by Hans Holbein the Younger Sir Thomas More (7 February 1478–6 July 1535), posthumously known also as Saint Thomas More, was an English lawyer, author, and politician. ... De Optimo Reipublicae Statu deque Nova Insula Utopia (translated On the Best State of a Republic and on the New Island of Utopia) or more simply Utopia is a 1516 book by Sir (Saint) Thomas More. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (January 3, 1892 – September 2, 1973) was an English philologist, writer and university professor, best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... The Lord of the Rings is an epic high fantasy novel written by the English academic J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The current Star Trek franchise logo Star Trek is an American science fiction entertainment series and media franchise. ... Star Wars is an epic science fantasy saga and fictional universe created by George Lucas during the late 1970s. ... Parallel universe or alternate reality in science fiction and fantasy is a self-contained separate reality coexisting with our own. ... The starship Enterprise as it appeared on Star Trek Star Trek is a culturally significant science fiction television series created by Gene Roddenberry in the 1960s. ... Mirror, Mirror was an episode of Star Trek: The Original Series. ... The Mirror Universe (MU) is a fictional parallel universe in which the plots of several Star Trek television episodes take place, named for Mirror, Mirror, the original series episode in which it first appeared. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12 part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ... The cover of the first novel in the Hitchhikers series, from a late 1990s printing. ... For the novel by Michael Crichton, see Timeline (novel). ... 2-dimensional renderings (ie. ...


Format

A fictional universe can be contained in a single work, as in George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four or Aldous Huxley's Brave New World, but nowadays is more common in serialized, series-based, open-ended or round robin-style fiction. A fictional universe may also be called a fictional realm, imaginary realm, fictional world, imaginary world or imaginary universe. Most fictional universes are based directly or indirectly on our own universe. A fictional universe is usually differentiated from the setting of, and the cosmology established by, ancient or modern legends, myths and religions, although there are countless fictional universes that draw upon such sources for inspiration. Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903[1][2] – 21 January 1950), better known by the pen name George Orwell, was an English author and journalist. ... This article is about the Orwell novel. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Brave New World is a dystopian novel by Aldous Huxley, first published in 1932. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... A book series is a sequence of books with common characteristics, typically written by the same author, or marketed as a group by their publisher. ... A round-robin story, or simply round robin, is a type of collaborative fiction or storytelling in which a number of authors each write chapters of a novel or pieces of a story, in rounds. ... An imaginary world is a setting, place or event or scenario at variance with objective reality, ranging from the voluntary suspension of disbelief of fictional universes and the socially constructed consensus reality of the Social Imaginary, to alternate realities resulting from disinformation, misinformation or imaginative speculation, and the subjective universe... This article is about Earth as a planet. ... The Universe is defined as the summation of all particles and energy that exist and the space-time in which all events occur. ... Cosmology, from the Greek: κοσμολογία (cosmologia, κόσμος (cosmos) order + λογια (logia) discourse) is the study of the Universe in its totality, and by extension, humanitys place in it. ... For other uses, see Legendary (disambiguation). ... The word mythology (from the Greek μυολογία mythología, from μυολογείν mythologein to relate myths, from μύος mythos, meaning a narrative, and λόγος logos, meaning speech or argument) literally means the (oral) retelling of myths – stories that a particular culture believes to be true and that use the supernatural to interpret natural events and... ķ Look up inspiration in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


In most small-scale fictional universes, general properties and timeline events fit into a consistently organized continuity. However, in the case of universes or universes that are rewritten or revised by different writers, editors or producers, this continuity may be violated, by accident or by design. The use of retroactive continuity (retcon) often occurs due to this kind of revision or oversight. Members of fandom often create a kind of fanmade canon (fanon) to patch up such errors; fanon that becomes generally accepted sometimes becomes actual canon. Other fanmade additions to a universe (fan fiction, pastiche, parody) are usually not considered canonical unless they are authorized. For the novel by Michael Crichton, see Timeline (novel). ... In fiction, continuity is consistency of the characteristics of persons, plot, objects, places and events seen by the reader or viewer. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... Editing may also refer to audio editing or film editing. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Fandom (from the noun fan and the affix -dom, as in kingdom, dukedom, etc. ... Fanon is a fact or ongoing situation related to a television program, book, movie, or video game that has been used so much by fan writers or among the fandom that it has been more or less established as having happened in the fictional world, but it has not actually... Fan fiction (also spelled fanfiction and commonly abbreviated to fanfic) is fiction written by people who enjoy a film, novel, television show or other media work, using the characters and situations developed in it and developing new plots in which to use these characters. ... The word pastiche describes a literary or other artistic genre. ... In contemporary usage, a parody is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... In security engineering and computer security, authorization, is a part of the operating system that protects computer resources by only allowing those resources to be used by resource consumers that have been granted authority to use them. ...


Collaboration

Fictional universes are sometimes shared by multiple authors, with each author's works in that universe being granted approximately equal canonical status. Other universes are created by one or several authors but are intended to be used non-canonically by others, such as the fictional settings for games, particularly role-playing games and video games. Settings for the role-playing game Dungeons & Dragons are called campaign settings; other games have also incorporated this term on occasion. Virtual worlds are fictional worlds in which online computer games, notably MMORPGs and MUDs, take place. A fictional crossover occurs when two or more fictional characters, series or universes cross over with one another, usually in the context of a character created by one author or owned by one company meeting a character created or owned by another. In the case where two fictional universes covering entire actual universes cross over, physical travel from one universe to another may actually occur in the course of the story. Such crossovers are usually, but not always, considered non-canonical by their creators or by those in charge of the properties involved. A shared universe is a literary technique in which several different authors create works of fiction that share aspects such as settings or characters and that are intended to be read as taking place in a single universe. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Tug of war is an easily organized, impromptu game that requires little equipment. ... This article is about games in which one plays the role of a character. ... Namcos Pac-Man was a hit, and became a universal phenomenon. ... Dungeons & Dragons (abbreviated as D&D or DnD) is a fantasy role-playing game (RPG) currently published by Wizards of the Coast. ... A campaign setting is a fictional fantasy world which serves as a setting for a role-playing game or wargame. ... A virtual world is a computer-based simulated environment intended for its users to inhabit and interact via avatars. ... Online means being connected to the Internet or another similar electronic network, like a bulletin board system. ... An image from World of Warcraft, one of the largest commercial MMORPGs as of 2004, based on active subscriptions. ... In computer gaming, a MUD (Multi-User Dungeon, Domain or Dimension) is a multi-player computer game that combines elements of role-playing games, hack and slash style computer games and social chat rooms. ... It has been suggested that Gaming crossovers be merged into this article or section. ... Alice, a fictional character based on a real character from the work of Lewis Carroll. ... The term company may refer to a separate legal entity, as in English law, or may simply refer to a business, as is the common use in the United States. ... For the 2006 film, see Intellectual Property (film). ...


References

  • Alberto Manguel & Gianni Guadalupi: The Dictionary of Imaginary Places, New York : Harcourt Brace, c2000. ISBN 0-15-100541-9
  • Brian Stableford: The Dictionary of Science Fiction Places, New York : Wonderland Press, c1999. ISBN 0-684-84958-5
  • Diana Wynne Jones: The Tough Guide to Fantasyland, New York : Firebird, 2006. ISBN 0-14-240722-4, Explains and parodies the common features of a standard fantasy world
  • George Ochoa and Jeffery Osier: Writer's Guide to Creating A Science Fiction Universe, Cincinnati, Ohio : Writer's Digest Books, c1993. ISBN 0-89879-536-2
  • Michael Page and Robert Ingpen : Encyclopedia of Things That Never Were: Creatures, Places, and People, 1987. ISBN 0-14-010008-3

Alberto Manguel is a writer, translator, and editor who was born in 1948 in Buenos Aires. ... Brian Stableford (born July 25, 1948) is a British science fiction writer who has published more than 50 novels. ... Diana Wynne Jones (born London August 16, 1934) is a British writer, principally of fantasy novels for children and adults, as well as a small amount of non-fiction. ... Writers Digest, established in 1920, is a United States publication devoted to both beginning and established writers, offering interviews, classifieds, market listings, calls for manuscripts, and tips. ... Michael Harry Page (born June 17, 1941) was an English cricketer. ... Timeline Born Geelong 1936 Educated at Geelong College 1957 Diploma of Graphic Art at RMIT 1958 Appointed as an artist at CSIRO to visually interpret and communicate the results of scientific research. ...

Related concepts

Alternate history (fiction) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... A rendered conworld, as would be seen from space by an observer. ... A fantasy world is a type of fictional universe in which magic or other similar powers work. ... A fictional universe is a cohesive fictional world that serves as the setting or backdrop for one or (more commonly) multiple works of fiction. ... Map of the Land of Oz, the fictional country in the book The Wonderful Wizard of Oz Map of the fictional island of Sodor used in the Thomas the Tank Engine stories Fictitious countries used in the novel Nineteen Eighty-Four A guidebook produced about the fictional country Molvanîa... Alternate history Campaign setting Fantasy world Fictional battlegrounds Fictional buildings Fictional city Fictional company Fictional counties Fictional country Fictional schools List of fictional Cambridge colleges List of fictional Oxford colleges Fictional universe List of fictional universes Future history Imaginary country Imaginary state Imaginary union Multiverse Mythical place Parallel universe Phantom... A future history is a postulated history of the future that some science fiction authors construct as a common background for fiction. ... An imaginary world is a setting, place or event or scenario at variance with objective reality, ranging from the voluntary suspension of disbelief of fictional universes and the socially constructed consensus reality of the Social Imaginary, to alternate realities resulting from disinformation, misinformation or imaginative speculation, and the subjective universe... A mythical place is a place that does not really exist but is accepted folklore or speculation that it might exist or might have existed in earlier times but its actual location is now lost. ... Parallel universe or alternate reality in science fiction and fantasy is a self-contained separate reality coexisting with our own. ... Planets in science fiction are fictional planets that appear in various media, especially those of the science fiction genre, as story-settings or depicted locations. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... Virtual reality (VR) is a technology which allows a user to interact with a computer-simulated environment, be it a real or imagined one. ...

External links

  • Worlds in the Net

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Fictional universe (3561 words)
Many universes written in one or both of these genres feature physical and metaphysical laws different from our own that allow for magical, psychic and various other types of paranormal phenomena, or the hypothesis may be based in a parallel universe which have some scientific theoretical speculation like multiverse.
A fictional universe is usually differentiated from the setting of, and the cosmology established by, ancient or modern legends, myths and religions, although there are countless fictional universes that draw upon such sources for inspiration.
However, in the case of universes or universes that are rewritten or revised by different writers, editors or producers, this continuity may be violated, by accident or by design.
Fictional universe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (827 words)
A fictional universe is usually differentiated from the setting of, and the cosmology established by, ancient or modern legends, myths and religions, although there are countless fictional universes that draw upon such sources for inspiration.
Fictional universes are sometimes shared by multiple authors, with each author's works in that universe being granted approximately equal canonical status.
However, in the case of universes or universes that are rewritten or revised by different writers, editors or producers, this continuity may be violated, by accident or by design.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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