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Encyclopedia > Fictional character

A fictional character is any person, persona, identity, or entity that is created from one's imagination or from an adaption of an existing entity. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... For other uses, see Person (disambiguation). ... Persona literally means mask , although it does not usually refer to a literal mask but to the social masks all humans supposedly wear. ...


o%20Card%20Archetypes%20&%20Modern%20Science%201996.htm The Emergence of Archetypes] in Present-Day Science And Its name="Dramatica">Dramatica: A New Theory of Story by Fourth Edition, Screenplay Systems Incorporated, 2001, online @ dramatica.com; Tenth Anniversary Edition, Write Brothers, Inc., 2004, ISBN 091897304X </ref> defines seven different archetypes defined by their "Action" and "Decision" characteristics:

  • Driver Characters:
    • Protagonist: "... the driver of the story: the one who forces the action." Defined by "Pursue" and "Consideration" characteristics.
      • Jungian equivalent: Hero
    • Antagonist: "... the character directly opposed to the Protagonist." "Prevent" & "Re-consideration".
    • Guardian: "... a teacher or helper who aids the Protagonist..." "Help" & "Conscience"
      • Jungian equivalent: Wise Old Man or Wise Old Woman, also sometimes referred to collectively as The Mentor
  • Passenger Characters
    • Reason: "... makes its decisions and takes action on the basis of logic..." "Control" & "Logic"
    • Emotion: "... responds with its feelings without thinking..." "Uncontrolled" & "Feeling"
    • Sidekick: "... unfailing in its loyalty and support." "Support" & "Faith".
    • Skeptic: "... doubts everything..." "Oppose" & "Disbelief"
      • Jung's Trickster archetype often overlaps here, since its purpose is to question and rebel against the established way of doing things

A single character may fulfill more than one archetypal role. A single character may also have many traits and feelings. A complex character may blend characteristics from different archetypes, just as real people embody aspects of each archetype. According to one writer/psychologist, A protagonist is the main figure of a piece of literature or drama and has the main part or role. ... For other uses, see Hero (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Antagonist (disambiguation). ... Shadows on pavement A shadow is a region of darkness where light is blocked. ... A wise old man: Philosopher in Meditation by Rembrandt The wise old man (or Senex) is an archetype as described by Carl Jung. ... For other uses, see Sidekick (disambiguation). ... Skepticism (Commonwealth spelling: Scepticism) can mean: Philosophical skepticism - a philosophical position in which people choose to critically examine whether the knowledge and perceptions that they have are actually true, and whether or not one can ever be said to have absolutely true knowledge; or Scientific skepticism - a scientific, or practical... For other uses, see Trickster (disambiguation). ...

Though in stories the archetypes are...fragmented into individual characters, in real life each of us carries qualities of each archetype. If we didn't, we wouldn't be able to relate to characters who represent the archetypes we were missing.[1]

Contents

Names of characters

The names of fictional characters are often quite important. The conventions of naming have changed over time. In many Restoration comedies, for example, characters are given emblematic names that sound nothing like real life names: "Sir Fidget", "Mr. Pinchwife" and "Mrs. Squeamish" are some typical examples (all from The Country Wife by William Wycherley). Some 18th and 19th century literature such as Les Misérables represent characters' names by the use of a single letter and a long dash (this convention is also used for other proper nouns, such as place names). This has the effect of suggesting that the author had a real person in mind but omitted the full name for propriety's sake. A similar technique was employed by Ian Fleming in his 20th century James Bond novels, where the real name for M, if spoken in dialogue, was always written "Adm. Sir M***". It is still common to echo an adjective or idea, if slightly changed, to suggest qualities of a character; Mr. Murdstone of David Copperfield suggests "murder" and unpleasantness. For other uses, see Restoration. ... William Wycherley in 1675. ... This article is about the original 1862 novel. ... This article is about the author. ... This article is about the spy series. ... M is a fictional character in Ian Flemings James Bond series, as well as the films in the Bond franchise. ... For other uses, see David Copperfield. ...


A character's name will sometimes reference a real-world, literary, or mythological precursor. This can be as simple as calling a character in love Romeo, or naming a character who seemingly comes back from the dead Phoenix. For other uses, see Romeo and Juliet (disambiguation). ... For other mythic firebirds, see Fire bird (mythology). ...


Some ways of classifying characters

The following are some ways in which readers sometimes classify characters.


Round vs. flat

Round characters are characters who are complex and realistic; they represent a depth of personality which is imitative of life. They frequently possess both good and bad traits, and they may react unexpectedly or become entangled in their own interior conflicts. These characters have been fully developed by an author, physically, mentally, and emotionally, and are detailed enough to seem real. A round character is usually a main character, and is developed over the course of the story. A flat character is its opposite, having hardly any development whatsoever.


Protagonists are normally round characters, though notable exceptions (such as Vonnegut's Harrison Bergeron[2]) exist. Antagonists are often round as well, though comedic villains may be almost farcically flat. Examples of round characters from various genres include Humbert Humbert of Nabokov's Lolita, Scarlett O'Hara and Rhett Butler of Mitchell's Gone with the Wind, Vladimir Taltos of Brust's series of novels, Frodo Baggins of J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings, Hannibal Lecter from The Silence of the Lambs, Buffy Summers of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Magneto of the X-Men comics and films, Syaoran of Clamp's Tsubasa: Reservoir Chronicle, Arthur Dent of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, V of V for Vendetta and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes. The protagonist is the central figure of a story, and is often referred to as a storys main character. ... Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. ... The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ... This article refers to literary antagonists. ... Bad guy redirects here. ... Look up farce in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This page is about the novelist. ... This article is about the novel by Vladimir Nabokov. ... Scarlett OHara (full name Katie Scarlett OHara Hamilton Kennedy Butler) of French-Irish ancestry is the protagonist in Margaret Mitchells 1936 novel Gone with the Wind and in the later film of the same name. ... Rhett Butler is the handsome, dashing hero of Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell. ... Margaret Munnerlyn Mitchell (November 8, 1900 – August 16, 1949), popularly known as Margaret Mitchell was an American author, who won the Pulitzer Prize in 1937 for her novel, Gone with the Wind, published in 1936. ... For the film, see Gone with the Wind (film). ... Vlad Táltos is the central character of a series of novels written by Steven Brust and set on the planet Dragaera. ... Steven Brust in 2004 at Minicon 39 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... Frodo redirects here. ... Tolkien redirects here. ... This article is about the novel. ... Hannibal Lecter is a fictional character in a series of novels by author Thomas Harris. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Buffy Anne Summers is the eponymous fictional character in the film Buffy the Vampire Slayer, the television program of the same name and its numerous spin-offs, such as novels, comic books, and video games. ... For other uses, see Buffy the Vampire Slayer (disambiguation). ... Magneto (Eric Magnus Lensherr) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... For the second comic book series starring the X-Men, see X-Men (vol. ... X-Men is a 2000 superhero film based upon the fictional characters the X-Men. ... Syaoran Li in Cardcaptor Sakura Syaoran Li (李 小狼, Japanese RÄ« Shaoran, Chinese pinyin Lǐ XiÇŽoláng or Li3 Xiao3lang2, romanized in the uncut anime as Shaoran Li), known as Li Showron in the English anime, is a fictional character in the manga and anime series Cardcaptor Sakura (the English anime... Clamp (or CLAMP) is an all-female Japanese mangaka group. ... Tsubasa: RESERVoir CHRoNiCLE (ツバサ-RESERVoir CHRoNiCLE-) is a manga made by CLAMP which is running in Shonen Magazine in Japan. ... For the Australian political activist see Albert Langer Arthur Philip Dent is a fictional character, the hapless protagonist in the comic science fiction series The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams. ... The cover of the first novel in the Hitchhikers series, from a late 1990s printing. ... V is a fictional character from comic book series V for Vendetta, created by Alan Moore and David Lloyd. ... This article is about the comic. ... Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, DL (22 May 1859 – 7 July 1930) was a Scottish author most noted for his stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, which are generally considered a major innovation in the field of crime fiction, and for the adventures of Professor Challenger. ... This article is about Arthur Conan Doyles fictional detective. ...


A flat character is distinguished by its lack of a realistic personality. Though the description of a flat character may be detailed and rich in defining characteristics, it falls short of the complexity associated with a round character. A number of stereotypical, or "stock" characters, have developed throughout the history of drama. Some of these characters include the country bumpkin, the con artist, and the city slicker. These characters are often the basis of flat characters, though elements of stock characters can be found in round characters as well. The commedia dell'arte, a form of improvisational theatre which originated in Italy, consists of performers acting as well-known stock characters in conventional situations. For other uses, see Stereotype (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Drama (disambiguation). ... Bumpkin is a slang term sometimes used to refer to people from the southern United States, or other sparsely populated areas. ... A confidence trick, confidence game, or con for short, (also known as a scam) is an attempt to intentionally mislead a person or persons (known as the mark) usually with the goal of financial or other gain. ... City Slicker was created by Bob Glasser in 2004. ... Commedia redirects here. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Supporting characters are generally flat, as most minor roles do not require a great deal of complexity. In addition, experimental literature and postmodern fiction often intentionally make use of flat characters, even as protagonists. A character of a book, play, movie, TV show or other form of storytelling usually used only to give dimension to a main character, by adding a relationship with this character, although sometimes supporting characters may develop a complexity of their own. ... Experimental literature are written works - often novels or magazines - that place great emphasis on innovations regarding technique and style . ... The term Postmodern literature is used to describe certain tendencies in post-World War II literature. ...


In addition to people, characters may be aliens, animals,[3] gods, an artificial intelligence or, occasionally, inanimate objects. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The word Animals when used alone has several possible meanings in the English language. ... See also: List of deities Look up deity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This is a sub-article of Artificial intelligence (AI), describing the different futuristic portrayals of fictional artificial intelligence. ...


Dynamic vs. static

A dynamic character is the one who changes significantly during the course of the story. Changes considered to qualify a character as dynamic include changes in sight or understanding, changes in commitment, and changes in values. Changes in circumstance, even physical circumstance, do not apply unless they result in some change within the character's self.[4] Visual perception is one of the senses, consisting of the ability to detect light and interpret (see) it as the perception known as sight or naked eye vision. ... Look up understanding in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Personal commitment is an interaction dominated by obligations. ... Value is a term that expresses the concept of worth in general, and it is thought to be connected to reasons for certain practices, policies or actions. ... The self is a key construct in several schools of psychology, especially in Self Psychology, a paradigm first associated with psychoanlytic theorist Heinz Kohut. ...


By definition, the protagonist is nearly always a dynamic character. In coming-of-age stories in particular, the protagonist often undergoes dramatic change, transforming from innocence to experience. Examples of dynamic characters include John the Savage of Huxley's Brave New World, Jay Gatsby of Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, Luke Skywalker from the original Star Wars Trilogy, Elizabeth Bennet of Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, Harry, Ron and Hermione in the Harry Potter series, Denver of Morrison’s Beloved, and Bilbo Baggins in The Hobbit. A protagonist is the main figure of a piece of literature or drama and has the main part or role. ... A Bildungsroman (IPA: /, German: novel of self-cultivation) is a novelistic variation of the monomyth that concentrates on the spiritual, moral, psychological, or social development and growth of the protagonist usually from childhood to maturity. ... Innocence is a term that describes the lack of guilt of an individual, with respect to a crime. ... Look up Experience in Wiktionary, the free dictionary This article discusses the general concept of experience. ... John the Savage is a fictional character from Brave New World. ... Aldous Leonard Huxley (26 July 1894 – 22 November 1963) was an English writer and one of the most prominent members of the famous Huxley family. ... For other uses, see Brave New World (disambiguation). ... The cover of the Scribner Paperback Fiction Edition, 1995. ... Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896 – December 21, 1940) was an American Jazz Age author of novels and short stories. ... This article is about the novel. ... Luke Skywalker is a fictional character from the Star Wars universe portrayed by Mark Hamill in the films Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope, Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back, and Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi. ... This article is about the series. ... Elizabeth Lizzy Bennet (sometimes referred to as Eliza or Lizzy) is a fictional character and the protagonist of Jane Austens novel Pride and Prejudice. ... A watercolour and pencil sketch of Jane Austen, believed to be drawn from life by her sister Cassandra (c. ... This article is about the novel. ... Cover of the original novel in the series, Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone. ... This article refers to the state capital of Colorado. ... For the Louisiana politician, see deLesseps Morrison, Jr. ... Beloved is a 1987 Pulitzer Prize winning novel by Nobel laureate Toni Morrison. ... Bilbo Baggins (2890 Third Age - ? Fourth Age) is an important character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... For other uses, see Hobbit (disambiguation) and There and Back Again (disambiguation). ...


Antagonists, such as Salieri of Shaffer's Amadeus, are frequently dynamic as well. This article refers to literary antagonists. ... This article is in need of attention. ... // Sir Peter Levin Shaffer (born May 15, 1926) is an English dramatist, author of numerous award-winning plays, several of which have been filmed. ... Playbill, 1981 For other uses, see Amadeus (disambiguation). ...


In contrast, a static character does not undergo significant change. A static character is a literary character who remains basically unchanged throughout a work. Whether round or flat, their personalities remain essentially stable throughout the course of the story. This is commonly done with secondary characters in order to let them serve as thematic or plot elements.


Supporting characters and major characters other than the protagonist are generally static, though exceptions do occur. A character of a book, play, movie, TV show or other form of storytelling usually used only to give dimension to a main character, by adding a relationship with this character, although sometimes supporting characters may develop a complexity of their own. ... A fictional character is any person who appears in a work of fiction. ...


A non-fictional character is a character that actually exists or existed in history, though their exploits in the story may differ from their historical activities. A nonfictional character is a character in a narrative that was a real-life figure. ...


Some works of fiction have attempted to portray a story without the use of characters (James Joyce's Finnegans Wake is one of the most famous examples). In animations and puppetry, different aspects of a given character are rendered separately using different modalities. In animation, for example, mannerisms and behavior are rendered by animators, while voices are rendered by voice actors. In machinima, voices are sometimes rendered using speech synthesis. This article is about the writer and poet. ... For the street ballad which the novel is named after, see Finnegans Wake. ... The bouncing ball animation (below) consists of these 6 frames. ... A puppeteer is a person who manipulates a puppet or marionette, either by the use of strings, wires or their hands, for a stage production or film. ... An animator is an artist who creates multiple images called frames that form an illusion of movement called animation when rapidly displayed. ... A voice actor (also a voice artist) is a person who provides voices for animated characters (including those in feature films, television series, animated shorts), voice-overs in radio and television commercials, audio dramas, dubbed foreign language films, video games, puppet shows, and amusement rides. ... A scene from the popular machinima series Red vs. ... Speech synthesis is the artificial production of human speech. ...


Some ways of reading characters

Readers vary greatly in how they understand fictional characters. The most extreme ways of reading fictional characters would be to think of them exactly as real people or to think of them as purely artistic creations that have everything to do with craft and nothing to do with real life. Most styles of reading fall somewhere in between.


Character as symbol

In some readings, certain characters are understood to represent a given quality or abstraction. Rather than simply being people, these characters stand for something larger. Many characters in Western literature have been read as Christ symbols, for example. Other characters have been read as symbolism of capitalist greed (as in F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby), the futility of fulfilling the American Dream, or quixotic romanticism (Don Quixote), or even feminism (Lara Croft)[citation needed]. Three of the principal characters in Lord of the Flies can be said to symbolize elements of civilization: Ralph represents the civilizing instinct; Jack represents the savage instinct; Piggy represents the rational side of human nature; while Simon represents spiritual. This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This page is about the title, office or what is known in Christian theology as the Divine Person. ... Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896 – December 21, 1940) was an American Jazz Age author of novels and short stories. ... This article is about the novel. ... Quixotism (IPA: [ˈkwɪksəˌtɪzm]) is the description of a person or an act that is caught up in the romance of noble deeds and the pursuit of unreachable goals. ... This article is about the fictional character and novel. ... Lara Croft is a fictional British video game character and the heroine of the Tomb Raider series of video games, movies, and comic books. ... For other uses, see Lord of the Flies (disambiguation). ...


Character as representative

Another way of reading characters symbolically is to understand each character as a representative of a certain group of people. For example, Bigger Thomas of Native Son by Richard Wright is often seen as representative of young black men in the 1930s, doomed to a life of poverty and exploitation.[citation needed] For other uses, see Native Son (disambiguation). ... For other persons of the same name, see Richard Wright. ...


Many practitioners of cultural criticism and feminist criticism focus their analysis of characters on cultural stereotypes. In particular, they consider the ways in which authors rely on and/or work against stereotypes when they create their characters. Such critics, for example, would read Native Son in relation to racist stereotypes of African American men as sexually violent (especially against white women). In reading Bigger Thomas' character, one could ask in what ways Richard Wright relied on these stereotypes to create a violent African-American male character and in what ways he fought against them by making that character the protagonist of the novel rather than an anonymous villain.[citation needed] A cultural critic is a critic of a given culture, usually as a whole and typically on a radical basis. ... In modern usage, a stereotype is a simplified mental picture of an individual or group of people who share a certain characteristic (or stereotypical) qualities. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial quota... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... For other persons of the same name, see Richard Wright. ... A protagonist is the main figure of a piece of literature or drama and has the main part or role. ... Bad guy redirects here. ...


Often, readings that focus on stereotypes focus on minor characters or stock characters, such as the ubiquitous sambo characters in early cinema, since those are the characters that tend to rely most heavily on stereotypes.[citation needed] A stock character is a fictional character that relies heavily on cultural types or stereotypes for its personality, manner of speech, and other characteristics. ... Sambo is now seen as a derogatory term for an African American. ...


Characters as historical or biographical references

Sometimes characters obviously represent important historical figures. For example, Nazi-hunter Yakov Liebermann in The Boys from Brazil by Ira Levin is often compared to real life Nazi-hunter Simon Wiesenthal, and corrupted populist politician Willie Stark from All the King's Men by Robert Penn Warren is often compared to Louisiana governor Huey P. Long. The Boys from Brazil (1976) is a fiction thriller novel by Ira Levin. ... Ira Levin (born August 27, 1929 in New York) is an American novelist, playwright and songwriter. ... Simon Wiesenthal, KBE, (Buczacz, December 31, 1908 – Vienna, September 20, 2005) was an Austrian-Jewish architectural engineer who hunted down Nazi war criminals, after surviving the Holocaust. ... This article is about the book. ... Robert Penn Warren Robert Penn Warren (April 24, 1905 – September 15, 1989) was an American poet, novelist, and literary critic, and was one of the founders of The New Criticism. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Huey Pierce Long (August 30, 1893–September 10, 1935), known as The Kingfish, was an American politician; he was governor of Louisiana (1928–1932), Senator (1932–1935) and a presidential hopeful before his assassination. ...


Other times, authors base characters on people from their own personal lives. Glenarvon by Lady Caroline Lamb chronicles her love affair with Lord Byron, who is thinly disguised as the title character. Nicole, a destructive, mentally ill woman in Tender Is the Night by F. Scott Fitzgerald, is often seen as a fictionalized version of Fitzgerald's wife, Zelda. Lady Caroline Lamb See also Lady Caroline Lamb (film) The Lady Caroline Lamb (13 November 1785–26 January 1828) was a novelist and British aristocrat, the only daughter of the 3rd Earl of Bessborough and Henrietta Ponsonby, Countess of Bessborough, with whom George IV fell in love. ... Lord Byron, English poet Lord Byron (1803), as painted by Elisabeth Vigee-Lebrun George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron, (January 22, 1788 – April 19, 1824) was the most widely read English language poet of his day. ... Tender Is the Night, first published by Charles Scribners Sons in 1934, is a novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald. ... Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896 – December 21, 1940) was an American Jazz Age author of novels and short stories. ... Zelda Sayre in 1919 Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald (July 24, 1900 – March 10, 1948), born Zelda Sayre in Montgomery, Alabama, was a novelist and the wife of writer F. Scott Fitzgerald, whom she married in 1920. ...


Perhaps because so many people enjoy imagining characters as real people, many critics devote their time to seeking out real people on whom literary figures were likely based. Frequently authors base stories on themselves or their loved ones. Sometimes writers create composite characters based on two or more individuals. A composite character is a character in a fictional work that is composed of two or more individuals. ...


Character as words

Some language- or text-oriented critics emphasize that characters are nothing more than certain conventional uses of words on a page[citation needed]: names or even just pronouns repeated throughout a text. They refer to characters as functions of the text[citation needed]. Some critics go so far as to suggest that even authors do not exist outside the texts that construct them[citation needed].


Character as patient: psychoanalytic readings

Psychoanalytic criticism usually treats characters as real people possessing complex psyches. Psychoanalytic critics approach literary characters as an analyst would treat a patient, searching their dreams, past, and behavior for explanations of their fictional situations. Psychoanalytic literary criticism is literary criticism which, in method, concept, theory or form, is influenced by the tradition of psychoanalysis begun by Sigmund Freud. ...


Alternatively, some psychoanalytic critics read characters as mirrors for the audience's psychological fears and desires. Rather than representing realistic psyches then, fictional characters offer readers a way to act out psychological dramas of their own in symbolic and often hyperbolic form. The classic example of this would be Freud's reading of Oedipus (and Hamlet, for that matter) as emblematic of the Oedipus complex (a child's fantasy of killing his father to possess his mother). Not to be confused with Hyperbola. ... Sigmund Freud (IPA: ), born Sigismund Schlomo Freud (May 6, 1856 – September 23, 1939), was an Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist who founded the psychoanalytic school of psychology. ... For other uses, see Oedipus (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hamlet (disambiguation). ... The Oedipus complex in Freudian psychoanalysis refers to a stage of psychosexual development in childhood where children of both sexes regard their father as an adversary and competitor for the exclusive love of their mother. ...


This form of reading persists today in much film criticism. The feminist critic Laura Mulvey is considered a pioneer in the field. Her groundbreaking 1975 article, "Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema",[5] analyzed the role of the male viewer of conventional narrative cinema as fetishist, using psychoanalysis "as a political weapon, demonstrating the way the unconscious of patriarchal society has structured film form." Film criticism is the analysis and evaluation of films, individually and collectively. ... Laura Mulvey (born August 15, 1941) is a British feminist film theorist. ... Two women in handcuffs and latex miniskirts and tops - Latex and PVC fetishism Wikinews has related news: Dr. Joseph Merlino on sexuality, insanity, Freud, fetishes and apathy Sexual fetishism is the sexual attraction for material and terrestrial objects while in reality the essence of the object is inanimate and sexless. ...


Unusual uses

Postmodern fiction frequently incorporates real characters into fictional and even realistic surroundings. In film, the appearance of a real person as himself inside of a fictional story is a type of cameo. For instance, Woody Allen's Annie Hall has Allen's character call in Marshall McLuhan to resolve a disagreement. A prominent example of this approach is Being John Malkovich, in which the actor John Malkovich plays the character John Malkovich (though the real actor and the character have different middle names). The term Postmodern literature is used to describe certain tendencies in post-World War II literature. ... Since its first use in 1851, a cameo role or cameo appearance has been a brief appearance in a play (or later, a movie) that stands out against the general context for its éclat or dramatic punch. ... Woody Allen (born Allen Stewart Konigsberg; December 1, 1935) is a three-time Academy Award-winning American film director, writer, actor, jazz musician, comedian and playwright. ... Annie Hall is a 1977 romantic comedy film directed by Woody Allen from a script he co-wrote with Marshall Brickman. ... “McLuhan” redirects here. ... Being John Malkovich is a 1999 film written by Charlie Kaufman and directed by Spike Jonze. ... John Gavin Malkovich (born December 9, 1953) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor, producer and director. ...


In some experimental fiction, the author acts as a character within his own text. One early example is Niebla ("Fog") by Miguel de Unamuno (1907), in which the main character visits Unamuno in his office to discuss his fate in the novel. Paul Auster also employs this device in his novel City of Glass (1985), which opens with the main character getting a phone call for Paul Auster. At first the main character explains that the caller has reached a wrong number, but eventually he decides to pretend to be Auster and see where it leads him. In Immortality by Milan Kundera, the author references himself in a storyline seemingly separate from that of his fictional characters, but at the end of the novel, Kundera meets his own characters. Other authors who have manifested themselves within the text include Kurt Vonnegut (notably in Breakfast of Champions), Dave Sim, in his comic book series Cerebus, and Stephen King in his Dark Tower series. Niebla (in English, Mist) is a novel written by Miguel de Unamuno and published in 1914. ... Don Miguel de Unamuno Miguel de Unamuno y Jugo (September 29, 1864–December 31, 1936) was an essayist, novelist, poet, playwright and philosopher from Spain. ... Paul Auster Paul Benjamin Auster (born February 3, 1947, Newark, New Jersey) is a Brooklyn-based author. ... Milan Kundera (IPA: ) (born April 1, 1929 in Brno, Czechoslovakia) is a Czech-born writer who writes in both Czech and French. ... Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. ... For the breakfast cereal, see Wheaties. ... David Victor Sim (born May 17, 1956 in Hamilton, Ontario) is a Canadian comic book writer and artist, best known as the creator of the 6,000 page graphic novel Cerebus the Aardvark. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Cerebus the Aardvark (or simply Cerebus) was an ambitious monthly independent comic book begun by Canadian artist Dave Sim in 1977, and running for 300 issues and 6,000 pages, through March 2004. ... For other persons named Stephen King, see Stephen King (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see The Dark Tower. ...


With the rise of the "star" system in Hollywood, many famous actors are so familiar that it can be hard to limit our reading of their character to a single film. In some sense, Bruce Lee is always Bruce Lee, Woody Allen is always Woody Allen, Tom Cruise is always Tom Cruise, John Cusack is always John Cuscack and Harrison Ford is always Harrison Ford[citation needed]; all often portray characters that are very alike, so audiences fuse the star persona with the characters they tend to play, a principle explored in the Arnold Schwarzenegger vehicle Last Action Hero. Bruce Lee (traditional Chinese: ; simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: Lǐ Xiǎolóng; Cantonese Yale: Léih Síulùhng; November 27, 1940 – July 20, 1973) was a Chinese-American martial artist, philosopher, instructor, and martial arts actor widely regarded as the most influential martial artist of the 20th century and a... Woody Allen (born Allen Stewart Konigsberg; December 1, 1935) is a three-time Academy Award-winning American film director, writer, actor, jazz musician, comedian and playwright. ... Tom Cruise (born Thomas Cruise Mapother IV on July 3, 1962) is an Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe Award-winning American actor and film producer. ... This article is about the actor. ... For the silent film actor, see Harrison Ford (silent film actor). ... Arnold Alois Schwarzenegger (German IPA: ; born July 30, 1947) is an Austrian-American bodybuilder, Golden Globe-winning actor, businessman and politician currently serving as the 38th Governor of the U.S. state of California. ... Last Action Hero is a 1993 action comedy directed by John McTiernan. ...


Some fiction and drama make constant reference to a character who is never seen. This often becomes a sort of joke with the audience. This device is the centrepoint of one of the most unusual and original plays of the 20th century, Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot, in which Godot of the title never arrives. Unseen characters are a common device in drama. ... This article is about the Irish writer. ... Waiting for Godot is a play by Samuel Beckett, in which the characters wait for Godot, who never arrives. ...


See also

Look up fictional character in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ... For other uses, see Fiction (disambiguation). ... In literature, a plot is all the events in a story particularly rendered towards the achievement of some particular artistic or emotional effect. ... In fiction, the setting of a story is the time and location in which it takes place. ... In literature, a theme is a broad idea in a story, or a message or lesson conveyed by a work. ... This article is about writing prose. ... Fiction writing consists of fashioning works of prose based on the imagination that could possibly be published in literary form. ... A fictional universe is an imaginary world that serves as the setting or backdrop for one or (more commonly) multiple works of fiction or translatable non-fiction. ... A Grand Argument is a type of conceptually complete story with both an emotional and logical comprehensiveness. ... Mary Sue (or simply Sue) is a pejorative expression for a fictional character who is an idealized stand-in for the author, or for a story with such a character. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

References

  1. ^ A Primer on Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious. by Carolyn Kaufman online at Archetype Writing: The Fiction Writers' Guide to Psychology.
  2. ^ Critical Concepts: Flat and Round Characterization
  3. ^ (see anthropomorphism)
  4. ^ Critical Concepts: "Static" and "Dynamic" Characterization
  5. ^ Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema (1975) - Laura Mulvey
Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... 7th millennium BC anthropomorphized rocks, with slits for eyes, found in modern-day Israel. ...

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Protection of Fictional Characters (2463 words)
Fictional characters have the same basic characteristics as graphic characters in that they portray the uniqueness of a particular character; the character has a name, physical appearance and attitude or character traits.
The primary difference between the fictional and graphic character is that the physical appearance and characterization of the fictional character resides in the imagination of the reader and is continually being developed in the reader's mind by the author's description of the character as the story unfolds.
This attitude may be due less to the courts' unwillingness to utilize trademark law to protect a fictional character than to the likelihood of such a case arising since it is highly unusual for a character that had never previously been depicted graphically to be used in a commercial fashion.
Critical Concepts: Character, Characterization (1963 words)
Typically the characters in a fictional work are endowed with distinctive personalities, and this fact (together with the long-established sense of a thing's "character" as its "distinctive nature") has given rise to an additional sense of the term "character" frequent in literary critical talk.
If a fictional character does this, he or she is a "static" character, and this "stasis" of character in the face of circumstance is a virtue.
For the same reason, one can say of a fictional character that he lacks character (is morally weak) or is not properly to be described as "a character" - that the set of traits with which he is endowed by the author do not include anything properly describable as eccentricities).
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