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Encyclopedia > Feynman Lectures on Physics

The Feynman Lectures on Physics, by Richard Feynman, is perhaps his most accessible technical work for anyone with an interest in physics and today is considered to be the classic introduction to modern physics, including lectures on mathematics, electromagnetism, Newtonian physics, quantum physics, and even the relation of physics to other sciences. The six most readily accessible chapters of the book were later compiled into a book entitled Six Easy Pieces: Essentials of Physics Explained by Its Most Brilliant Teacher, and the next six hardest in Six Not So Easy Pieces: Einstein's Relativity, Symmetry and Space-Time. Richard Phillips Feynman (May 11, 1918 – February 15, 1988) (surname pronounced FINE-man; in IPA) was one of the most influential American physicists of the 20th century, expanding greatly the theory of quantum electrodynamics. ... Wikibooks Wikiversity has more about this subject: School of Mathematics Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Mathematics Look up Mathematics in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Mathematics Inter. ... Electromagnetism is the physics of the electromagnetic field: a field, encompassing all of space, which exerts a force on those particles that possess a property known as electric charge, and is in turn affected by the presence and motion of such particles. ... Classical mechanics is a model of the physics of forces acting upon bodies. ... Fig. ...


The first volume, for example, shows how to solve the N-body differential equation for the motion of the planets numerically, a feat which would have impressed Isaac Newton. The second volume is mainly on electrodynamics and electromagnetism. The third volume, on quantum mechanics, shows, for example, how the double-slit experiment contains the essential feature of quantum mechanics. Numerical analysis is the study of algorithms for the problems of continuous mathematics (as distinguished from discrete mathematics). ... Sir Isaac Newton, PRS (4 January [O.S. 25 December 1642] 1643 – 31 March [O.S. 20 March] 1727) was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, astrologer, alchemist, and philosopher who is one of the most influential scientists in history. ... Electromagnetism is the physics of the electromagnetic field: a field, encompassing all of space, composed of the electric field and the magnetic field. ... Electromagnetism is the physics of the electromagnetic field: a field, encompassing all of space, which exerts a force on those particles that possess a property known as electric charge, and is in turn affected by the presence and motion of such particles. ... Fig. ... The double-slit experiment consists of letting light diffract through two slits producing fringes on a screen. ...

Contents


Background

By 1960 Richard Feynman was already a legend in his own time; at age 42 his research and discoveries in physics had resolved a number of troubling inconsistencies in several fundamental theories. In particular, it was his work in quantum electrodynamics which would lead to the award in 1965 of the Nobel Prize in physics. At the same time that Feynman was at the pinnacle of his fame, the faculty of the California Institute of Technology was concerned about the quality of the introductory courses being offered to the undergraduate students. It was felt that these were burdened by an old fashioned syllabus and that the exciting discoveries of recent years, many of which had occurred at Caltech, were not being conveyed to the students. 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Richard Phillips Feynman (May 11, 1918 – February 15, 1988) (surname pronounced FINE-man; in IPA) was one of the most influential American physicists of the 20th century, expanding greatly the theory of quantum electrodynamics. ... Quantum electrodynamics (QED) is a quantum field theory of electromagnetism. ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link goes to calendar). ... Sir Edward Appletons medal Photographs of Nobel Prize Medals. ... California Institute of Technology The California Institute of Technology (commonly known as Caltech) is a private, coeducational university located in Pasadena, California, in the United States. ...


Thus it was decided to reconfigure the first physics course offered to students at Caltech, with the goal being to generate more excitement to the students. Who better to teach this course than the most famous lecturer on physics on campus? To the surprise of the Department, Feynman readily agreed to give the course, though only once. Aware of the fact that this would be an historic event, Caltech recorded each lecture and took photographs of each drawing made on the blackboard by Feynman.


Based on the lectures and the tape recordings, a team of physicists and graduate students put together a manuscript that would become Richard Feynman's most widely read and influential scientific work: The Feynman Lectures on Physics.


As the two year course was still being completed, word of it spread throughout the physics community and by the end of the two year period, more lectures were being attended by physicist and postgraduate students than the undergraduates for whom it was originally intended. The final result was, however, as Caltech had hoped; the encapsulation of the entire field of physics by its greatest living practitioner.


Addison-Wesley published a collection of problems to accompany The Feynman Lectures on Physics. The problem sets were first used in the 1962-63 academic year and organized by Robert B. Leighton. It should be noted that some of the problems are sophisticated enough to require understanding of topics as advanced as Kolmogorov's zero-one law, for example. Robert B. Leighton (September 10, 1919 - March 9, 1997) was an American physicist who spent his professional career at the California Institute of Technology. ... In probability theory, Kolmogorovs zero-one law, named in honor of Andrey Nikolaevich Kolmogorov, specifies that a certain type of event, called a tail event, will either almost surely happen or almost surely not happen; that is, the probability of such an event occurring is zero or one. ...


Addison-Wesley also released all the audio tapes of the lectures, over 103 hours with Richard Feynman, in CD format after remastering the sound and clearing the recordings.


One lecture's collection of notes was lost for a number of years. It was finally located, restored, and made available as Feynman's Lost Lecture: The Motion of Planets Around the Sun.


Contents

Volume 1. Mainly mechanics, radiation, and heat

Chapter 1. Atoms in motion
Chapter 2. Basic Physics
Chapter 3. The relation of physics to other sciences
Chapter 4. Conservation of energy
Chapter 5. Time and distance
Chapter 6. Probability
Chapter 7. The theory of gravitation
Chapter 8. Motion
Chapter 9. Newton's laws of dynamics
Chapter 10. Conservation of momentum
Chapter 11. Vectors
Chapter 12. Characteristics of force
Chapter 13. Work and potential energy (A)
Chapter 14. Work and potential energy (conclusion)
Chapter 15. The special theory of relativity
Chapter 16. Relativistic energy and momentum
Chapter 17. Space-time
Chapter 18. Rotation in two dimensions
Chapter 19. Center of mass; Moment of inertia
Chapter 20. Rotation in space
Chapter 21. The harmonic oscillator
Chapter 22. Algebra
Chapter 23. Resonance
Chapter 24. Transients
Chapter 25. Linear systems and review
Chapter 26. Optics: The principle of least time
Chapter 27. Geometrical optics
Chapter 28. Electromagnetic radiation
Chapter 29. Interference
Chapter 30. Diffraction
Chapter 31. The origin of the refractive index
Chapter 32. Radiation damping. Light scattering
Chapter 33. Polarization
Chapter 34. Relativistic effects in radiation
Chapter 35. Color vision
Chapter 36. Mechanisms of seeing
Chapter 37. Quantum behavior
Chapter 38. The Relation of Wave and particle viewpoints
Chapter 39. The kinetic theory of gases
Chapter 40. The principles of statistical mechanics
Chapter 41. The brownian movement
Chapter 42. Applications of kinetic theory
Chapter 43. Diffusion
Chapter 44. The laws of thermodynamics
Chapter 45. Illustrations of thermodynamics
Chapter 46. Ratchet and pawl
Chapter 47. Sound. The wave equation
Chapter 48. Beats
Chapter 49. Modes
Chapter 50. Harmonics
Chapter 51. Waves
Chapter 52. Symmetry in physical laws Properties For alternative meanings see atom (disambiguation). ... In physics, motion means a change in the position of a body with respect to time, as measured by a particular observer in a particular frame of reference. ... Since antiquity, people have tried to understand the behavior of matter: why unsupported objects drop to the ground, why different materials have different properties, and so forth. ... // What is science? There are various understandings of the word science. According to empiricism, scientific theories are objective, empirically testable, and predictive — they predict empirical results that can be checked and possibly contradicted. ... Conservation of energy is possibly the most important, and certainly the most practically useful of several conservation laws in physics. ... A watch Attempting to understand Time has long been a prime occupation for philosophers, scientists and artists. ... The distance between two points is the length of a straight line segment between them. ... The word probability derives from the Latin probare (to prove, or to test). ... Theory has a number of distinct meanings in different fields of knowledge, depending on the context and their methodologies. ... Gravitation is the tendency of massive objects to accelerate towards each other. ... In physics, motion means a change in the position of a body with respect to time, as measured by a particular observer in a particular frame of reference. ... Sir Isaac Newton, PRS (4 January [O.S. 25 December 1642] 1643 – 31 March [O.S. 20 March] 1727) was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, astrologer, alchemist, and philosopher who is one of the most influential scientists in history. ... Newtons first and second laws, in Latin, from the original 1687 edition of the Principia Mathematica. ... In physics, a conservation law states that a particular measurable property of an isolated physical system does not change as the system evolves. ... In physics and in vector calculus, a spatial vector is a concept characterized by a magnitude, which is a scalar, and a direction (which can be defined in a 3-dimensional space by the Euler angles). ... In physics, a force is an external cause responsible for any change of a physical system. ... Look up work in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Potential energy is stored energy. ... Look up work in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Potential energy is stored energy. ... A simple introduction to this subject is provided in Special relativity for beginners Special relativity (SR) or the special theory of relativity is the physical theory published in 1905 by Albert Einstein. ... Albert Einsteins theory of relativity is a set of two theories in physics: special relativity and general relativity. ... In physics, momentum is the product of the mass and velocity of an object. ... In special relativity and general relativity, time and three-dimensional space are treated together as a single four-dimensional pseudo-Riemannian manifold called spacetime. ... Dimension (from Latin measured out) is, in essence, the number of degrees of freedom available for movement in a space. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Center of gravity. ... Moment of inertia quantifies the rotational inertia of an object, i. ... Rotation of a planar figure around a point Rotation of a planar body is the movement when points of the body travel in circular trajectories around a fixed point called the center of rotation. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Space Attempting to understand the nature of space has always been a prime occupation for philosophers and scientists. ... In acoustics and telecommunication, the harmonic of a wave is a component frequency of the signal that is an integer multiple of the fundamental frequency. ... A harmonic oscillator is either a mechanical system in which there exists a returning force F directly proportional to the displacement x from a given equilibrium position, i. ... Algebra is a branch of mathematics which studies structure and quantity. ... In physics, resonance is the tendency of a system to absorb more energy when the frequency of the oscillations matches the systems natural frequency of vibration (its resonant frequency) than it does at other frequencies. ... Transient means passing with time. ... A linear system is a model of a system based on some kind of linear operator. ... See also: List of optical topics Optics (appearance or look in ancient Greek) is a branch of physics that describes the behavior and properties of light and the interaction of light with matter. ... Fermats principle assures that the angles given by Snells law always reflect lights quickest path between P and Q. Fermats principle in optics states: This principle was first stated by Pierre de Fermat. ... See also list of optical topics. ... Electromagnetism is the physics of the electromagnetic field: a field, encompassing all of space, composed of the electric field and the magnetic field. ... Radiation has a variety of different meanings. ... Interference of two circular waves - Wavelength (decreasing bottom to top) and Wave centers distance (increasing to the right). ... Diffraction is the bending and spreading of waves when they meet an obstruction. ... The origin of something (from the Latin origo, beginning) is where it came from, in the sense of a physical location or a metaphysical source. ... The refractive index of a material is the factor by which the phase velocity of electromagnetic radiation is slowed relative to vacuum. ... Radiation damping in accelerator physics is a way of reducing the beam emittance of a beam of accelerated charged particles. ... In particle physics, scattering is a class of phenomena by which particles are deflected by collisions with other particles. ... This article treats polarization in electrodynamics. ... Color vision is the capacity of an organism or machine to distinguish objects based on the wavelength of the light they reflect or emit. ... Fig. ... A wave is a disturbance that propagates in a periodically repeating fashion, often transferring energy. ... A particle is Look up Particle in Wiktionary, the free dictionary In particle physics, a basic unit of matter or energy. ... The kinetic theory of gases is a theory that explains the macroscopic properties of gases by consideration of their composition at a molecular level. ... -1... Statistical mechanics is the application of statistics, which includes mathematical tools for dealing with large populations, to the field of mechanics, which is concerned with the motion of particles or objects when subjected to a force. ... An example of 1000 simulated steps of Brownian motion in two dimensions. ... The kinetic theory of gases is a theory that explains the macroscopic properties of gases by consideration of their composition at a molecular level. ... Diffusion, being the spontaneous spreading of matter (particles), heat, or momentum, is one type of transport phenomena. ... Thermodynamics (from the Greek thermos meaning heat and dynamis meaning power) is a branch of physics that studies the effects of temperature, pressure, and volume changes on physical systems at the macroscopic scale. ... Thermodynamics (from the Greek thermos meaning heat and dynamis meaning power) is a branch of physics that studies the effects of temperature, pressure, and volume changes on physical systems at the macroscopic scale. ... A ratchet can be: the Cwn Annwn in Brythonic mythology, the hounds of Annwn a mechanical device for controlling rotational motion a musical instrument; see ratchet (instrument) a Transformer; see Ratchet (Transformer) a character, from the Ratchet & Clank series a ficitional character, Nurse Ratched, from One Flew Over the Cuckoo... Pawl was a Formula One constructor (Indy 500 only) in 1951, 1954 and 1955. ... A schematic representation of hearing. ... A wave is a disturbance that propagates in a periodically repeating fashion, often transferring energy. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Mode has several meanings: In statistics, the mode is the value that has the largest number of observations, namely the most frequent value or values. ... In acoustics and telecommunication, the harmonic of a wave is a component frequency of the signal that is an integral multiple of the fundamental frequency. ... Waves may refer to different topics including: Waves, the natural phenomenon WAVES, the womens unit of the US Navy during World War II. Waves, Waves Ltd. ... Square with symmetry group D<sub>4</sub> Symmetry is a characteristic of geometrical shapes, equations, and other objects; we say that such an object is symmetric with respect to a given operation if this operation, when applied to the object, does not appear to change it. ... A physical law or a law of nature is a scientific generalization based on empirical observations. ...


Volume 2. Mainly electromagnetism and matter

Chapter 1. Electromagnetism
Chapter 2. Differential calculus of vector fields
Chapter 3. Vector integral calculus
Chapter 4. Electrostatics
Chapter 5. Application of Gauss' law
Chapter 6. The electric field in various circumstances
Chapter 7. The electric field in various circumstances (continued)
Chapter 8. Electrostatic energy
Chapter 9. Electricity in the atmosphere
Chapter 10. Dielectrics
Chapter 11. Inside dielectrics
Chapter 12. Electrostatic analogs
Chapter 13. Magnetostatics
Chapter 14. The magnetic field in various situations
Chapter 15. The vector potential
Chapter 16. Induced currents
Chapter 17. The laws of induction
Chapter 18. The Maxwell equations
Chapter 19. The principle of least action
Chapter 20. Solutions of Maxwell's equations in free space
Chapter 21. Solutions of Maxwell's equations with currents and charges
Chapter 22. AC circuits
Chapter 23. Cavity resonators
Chapter 24. Waveguides
Chapter 25. Electrodynamics in relativistic notation
Chapter 26. Lorentz transformations of the fields
Chapter 27. Field energy and field momentum
Chapter 28. Electromagnetic mass
Chapter 29. The motion of charges in electric and magnetic fields
Chapter 30. The internal geometry of crystals
Chapter 31. Tensors
Chapter 32. Refractive index of dense materials
Chapter 33. Reflection from surfaces
Chapter 34. The magnetism of matter
Chapter 35. Paramagnetism and magnetic resonance
Chapter 36. Ferromagnetism
Chapter 37. Magnetic materials
Chapter 38. Elasticity
Chapter 39. Elastic materials
Chapter 40. The flow of dry water
Chapter 41. The flow of wet water
Chapter 42. Curved space Electromagnetism is the physics of the electromagnetic field: a field, encompassing all of space, which exerts a force on those particles that possess a property known as electric charge, and is in turn affected by the presence and motion of such particles. ... Differential calculus is the theory of and computations with differentials; see also derivative and calculus. ... Vector field given by vectors of the form (-y, x) In mathematics a vector field is a construction in vector calculus which associates a vector to every point in Euclidean space. ... Vector calculus is a field of mathematics concerned with multivariate real analysis of vectors in 2 or more dimensions. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with static electricity. ... In physics, Gausss law gives the relation between the electric flux flowing out a closed surface and the charge enclosed in the surface. ... In physics, an electric field or E-field is an effect produced by an electric charge that exerts a force on charged objects in its vicinity. ... In physics, an electric field or E-field is an effect produced by an electric charge that exerts a force on charged objects in its vicinity. ... Electricity is a general term applied to phenomena involving a fundamental property of matter called an electric charge // Related concepts Lightning strikes during a night-time thunderstorm. ... Layers of Atmosphere (NOAA) Earths atmosphere is a layer of gases surrounding the planet Earth and retained by the Earths gravity. ... The electrons in the molecules shift toward the positively charged left plate. ... The electrons in the molecules shift toward the positively charged left plate. ... For the Analog Science Fiction and Science Fact publication, see Astounding Magazine. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Current flowing through a wire produces a magnetic field (M) around the wire. ... In vector calculus, a vector potential is a vector field whose curl is a given vector field. ... Electromagnetic induction is the production of an electrical potential difference (or voltage) across a conductor situated in a changing magnetic flux. ... Faradays law of induction gives the relation between the rate of change of the magnetic flux through the area enclosed by a closed loop and the electric field induced along the loop: where E is the induced electric field, ds is an infinitesimal element of the closed loop and... Maxwells equations (sometimes called the Maxwell equations) are the set of four equations, attributed to James Clerk Maxwell, that describe the behavior of both the electric and magnetic fields, as well as their interactions with matter. ... Fermats principle assures that the angles given by Snells law always reflect lights quickest path between P and Q. Fermats principle in optics states: This principle was first stated by Pierre de Fermat. ... Maxwells equations (sometimes called the Maxwell equations) are the set of four equations, attributed to James Clerk Maxwell, that describe the behavior of both the electric and magnetic fields, as well as their interactions with matter. ... In physics, free space is a concept of electromagnetic theory, corresponding roughly to the vacuum, the baseline state of the electromagnetic field, or the replacement for the electromagnetic aether. ... Maxwells equations (sometimes called the Maxwell equations) are the set of four equations, attributed to James Clerk Maxwell, that describe the behavior of both the electric and magnetic fields, as well as their interactions with matter. ... In electricity, current refers to electric current, which is the flow of electric charge. ... Electric charge is a fundamental conserved property of some subatomic particles, which determines their electromagnetic interactions. ... city lights viewed in a motion blurred exposure. ... An electrical network or electrical circuit is an interconnection of electrical elements such as resistors, inductors, capacitors, diodes, switches and transistors. ... A cavity resonator uses resonance to amplify a wave. ... A waveguide used for propagating RF or electromagnetic waves. ... Electromagnetism is the physics of the electromagnetic field: a field, encompassing all of space, composed of the electric field and the magnetic field. ... The Lorentz transformation (LT), named after its discoverer, the Dutch physicist and mathematician Hendrik Antoon Lorentz (1853-1928), forms the basis for the special theory of relativity, which has been introduced to remove contradictions between the theories of electromagnetism and classical mechanics. ... A field is an open land area, used for growing agricultural crops. ... In physics, motion means a change in the position of a body with respect to time, as measured by a particular observer in a particular frame of reference. ... Electric charge is a fundamental conserved property of some subatomic particles, which determines their electromagnetic interactions. ... In physics, an electric field or E-field is an effect produced by an electric charge that exerts a force on charged objects in its vicinity. ... Current flowing through a wire produces a magnetic field (M) around the wire. ... Geometry (Greek γεωμετρία; geo = earth, metria = measure) arose as the field of knowledge dealing with spatial relationships. ... Crystal (disambiguation) Insulin crystals A crystal is a solid in which the constituent atoms, molecules, or ions are packed in a regularly ordered, repeating pattern extending in all three spatial dimensions. ... For more technical Wiki articles on tensors, see the section later in this article. ... The refractive index of a material is the factor by which the phase velocity of electromagnetic radiation is slowed relative to vacuum. ... material is the substance or matter from which something is or can be made, or also items needed for doing or creating something. ... The word reflection (also spelt reflexion in British English) can refer to several different concepts: In mathematics, reflection is the transformation of a space. ... In physics, magnetism is one of the phenomena by which materials exert an attractive or repulsive force on other materials. ... Matter is commonly referred to as the substance of which physical objects are composed. ... Paramagnetism is the tendency of the atomic magnetic dipoles, due to quantum-mechanical spin as well as electron orbital angular momentum, to align with an external magnetic field. ... Magnetic resonance can mean: Nuclear magnetic resonance Electron spin resonance This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Ferromagnetism is a phenomenon by which a material can exhibit a spontaneous magnetization, and is one of the strongest forms of magnetism. ... In physics, magnetism is a phenomenon by which materials exert an attractive or repulsive force on other materials. ... Elasticity has meanings in two different fields: In physics and mechanical engineering, the theory of elasticity describes how a solid object moves and deforms in response to external stress. ... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The word flow has several different meanings: In fluid mechanics, the word flow is often used to mean a complete description of the motion of a fluid. ... The word flow has several different meanings: In fluid mechanics, the word flow is often used to mean a complete description of the motion of a fluid. ... Two-dimensional visualisation of space-time distortion. ...


Volume 3. Quantum mechanics

Chapter 1. Quantum behavior
Chapter 2. The relation of wave and particle viewpoints
Chapter 3. Probability amplitudes
Chapter 4. Identical particles
Chapter 5. Spin one
Chapter 6. Spin one-half
Chapter 7. The dependence of amplitudes on time
Chapter 8. The Hamiltonian matrix
Chapter 9. The ammonia maser
Chapter 10. Other two-state systems
Chapter 11. More two-state systems
Chapter 12. The hyperfine splitting in hydrogen
Chapter 13. Propagation in a crystal lattice
Chapter 14. Semiconductors
Chapter 15. The independent particle approximation
Chapter 16. The dependence of amplitudes on position
Chapter 17. Symmetry and conservation laws
Chapter 18. Angular momentum
Chapter 19. The hydrogen atom and the periodic table
Chapter 20. Operators
Chapter 21. The Schrödinger equation in a classical context: a seminar on superconductivity Fig. ... A wave is a disturbance that propagates in a periodically repeating fashion, often transferring energy. ... A particle is Look up Particle in Wiktionary, the free dictionary In particle physics, a basic unit of matter or energy. ... In quantum mechanics, a probability amplitude is a complex number-valued function which describes an uncertain or unknown quantity. ... In physics, a particle is an object, or body, with only a few degrees-of-freedom, including position, and perhaps orientation in space. ... In physics, spin refers to the angular momentum intrinsic to a body, as opposed to orbital angular momentum, which is generated by the motion of its center of mass about an external point. ... In physics, spin refers to the angular momentum intrinsic to a body, as opposed to orbital angular momentum, which is generated by the motion of its center of mass about an external point. ... In quantum mechanics, a probability amplitude is a complex number-valued function which describes an uncertain or unknown quantity. ... The Hamiltonian, denoted H, has two distinct but closely related meanings. ... Ammonia is a compound of nitrogen and hydrogen with the formula NH3. ... A maser is a device that produces coherent electromagnetic waves through amplification due to stimulated emission. ... For the Macintosh operating system, which was called System up to version 7. ... For the Macintosh operating system, which was called System up to version 7. ... General Name, Symbol, Number hydrogen, H, 1 Chemical series nonmetals Group, Period, Block 1, 1, s Appearance colorless Atomic mass 1. ... The word propagation can mean: Multiplication or increase, as by natural reproduction. ... In mineralogy and crystallography, a crystal structure is a unique arrangement of atoms in a crystal. ... A semiconductor is a material that is an insulator at very low temperature, but which has a sizable electrical conductivity at room temperature. ... Square with symmetry group D<sub>4</sub> Symmetry is a characteristic of geometrical shapes, equations, and other objects; we say that such an object is symmetric with respect to a given operation if this operation, when applied to the object, does not appear to change it. ... In physics, a conservation law states that a particular measurable property of an isolated physical system does not change as the system evolves. ... In physics the angular momentum of an object with respect to a reference point is a measure for the extent to which, and the direction in which, the object rotates about the reference point. ... A hydrogen atom is an atom of the element hydrogen. ... The periodic table of the chemical elements, also called the Mendeleev periodic table, is a tabular display of the known chemical elements. ... In mathematical formulations of quantum mechanics, an operator is a linear transformation from a Hilbert space to itself. ... In physics, the Schrödinger equation, proposed by the Austrian physicist Erwin Schrödinger in 1925, describes the time-dependence of quantum mechanical systems. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor (with boiling liquid nitrogen underneath) demonstrates the Meissner effect. ...


Quotes

  • Feynman once commented, about these three volumes: "[This set of books] has views which are very close to my own."

Publishing information

  • The Feynman Lectures on Physics (with Leighton and Sands). 3 volumes 1964, 1966. Library of Congress Catalog Card No. 63-20717
    • ISBN 0201021153 (1970 paperback three-volume set)
    • ISBN 0201500647 (1989 commemorative hardcover three-volume set)
    • ISBN 0805390456 (2006 the definitive edition; hardcover)
  • Six Easy Pieces (hardcover book with original Feynman audio on CDs) ISBN 0201408961
  • Six Easy Pieces (paperback book) ISBN 0201408252
  • Six Not-So-Easy Pieces (paperback book with original Feynman audio on CDs) ISBN 0201328410
  • Six Not-So-Easy Pieces (paperback book) ISBN 0201328429

  Results from FactBites:
 
Boston Globe Online / Table of Contents (607 words)
Feynman, who died at the University of California at Los Angeles Medical Center after an eight-year battle with abdominal cancer, was a popular and energetic lecturer who, despite his illness, continued to teach at the California Institute of Technology until two weeks ago.
Feynman, who called his Nobel Prize "a pain in the neck," was "extraordinarily honest with himself and everyone else," and added that "he didn't like ceremony or pomposity.
Feynman caused consternation in his years with the Manhattan Project, which developed the atomic bomb, by figuring out in his spare time how to pick the locks on filing cabinets that contained classified information.
The Feynman Lectures on Physics - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (798 words)
The Feynman Lectures on Physics, by Richard Feynman, is perhaps his most accessible technical work for anyone with an interest in physics and today is considered to be the classic introduction to modern physics, including lectures on mathematics, electromagnetism, Newtonian physics, quantum physics, and even the relation of physics to other sciences.
By 1960 Richard Feynman was already a legend in his own time; at age 42 his research and discoveries in physics had resolved a number of troubling inconsistencies in several fundamental theories.
The Feynman Lectures on Physics (with Leighton and Sands).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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