FACTOID # 28: Austin, Texas has more people than Alaska.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Ferlin Husky

Ferlin Husky (born December 3, 1925 in Flat River, Missouri) is an American singer who has become well-known as a country-pop chart-topper under various names, including Terry Preston and Simon Crum. In the 1950s and 60s, Husky had several hits, including "Gone" and "Wings of a Dove", both number ones on the country charts. December 3 is the 337th (in leap years the 338th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... Park Hills is a city located in St. ... country music, see Country music (disambiguation) In popular music, country music, also called country and western music or country-western, is an amalgam of popular musical forms developed in the Southern United States, with roots in traditional folk music, Celtic music, blues, gospel music, and old-time music that began... For Popular music (music that is popular, rather than of a specific genre or style), see Popular music. ... The 1950s were the decade that spanned the years 1950 through 1959, although some sources say from 1951 through 1960. ... The outrageously crowded Woodstock festival epitomized the popular antiwar movement of the 60s. ... For other uses, see Bob Ferguson   Bob Ferguson Robert Bruce Bob Ferguson Sr (December 30, 1927 – July 22, 2001) was an American songwriter, record producer, and historian. ...


As a merchant marine, Husky entertained the troops on his ship in World War 2. After the war, Husky became a DJ in Missouri and Bakersfield, California, where he began using the moniker Terry Preston in order to hide his rural roots. As a honky tonk singer, Husky signed with Capitol Records in 1953 under the guidance of Cliffie Stone, also the manager for Tennessee Ernie Ford. With Capitol Records, he reverted to his given name. A few singles failed before "A Dear John Letter" with Jean Shepard became a #1 hit. The followup was called "Forgive Me John". Combatants Allies: Soviet Union, United Kingdom, France/Free France, United States, Canada, China, India, Australia, Poland, New Zealand, South Africa, and others Axis Powers: Germany, Italy, Japan, Bulgaria, Finland, Romania, Hungary, Burma Casualties Military dead: 17 million Civilian dead: 33 million Total dead: 50 million Military dead: 8 million Civilian... DJ or dj may stand for Disc jockey, dinner jacket The DeadJournal website, or Djibouti. ... Official language(s) None Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City Largest metro area St. ... City nickname:Californias Country Music Capital County Kern County, California Area  - Total  - Water 296. ... Honky tonk was originally the name of a type of bar common throughout the southern United States, also Honkatonk or Honkey-tonk. ... Capitol Records is a major United States-based record label, owned by EMI. // History The Capitol Records company was founded by the songwriter Johnny Mercer in 1942, with the financial help of movie producer Buddy DeSylva and the business acumen of Glenn Wallichs, (1910-1971) (owner of Music City, at... 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1953 calendar). ... Ernest Jennings Ford (February 13, 1919 -October 17, 1991), better known by the stage name Tennessee Ernie Ford, was a pioneering U.S. recording artist and television host who enjoyed success in the country & western, pop, and gospel musical genres. ...


In 1955, Husky had a solo hit with "I Feel Better All Over (More Than Anywhere's Else)"/"Little Tom", and developed Simon Crum as a comic alter ego. As Crum, Husky signed a separate contract with Capitol Records and began releasing records, the biggest of which was 1959's "Country Music is Here to Stay" (No. 2 for three weeks). 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In the late 1950s, Husky had a long string of hits, including the #1 "Gone", and he bgan an acting career on the Kraft TV Theatre program and the film Mr. Rock & Roll. Bob Ferguson's "Wings of a Dove" became his biggest hits, topping the country charts for ten weeks and attaining #12 on the pop charts. Once again unable to sustain his momentum, Husky had only a few charting singles until the late 1960s, when he became a country-pop star before briefly retiring in 1977 following heart surgery. He remains a popular concert draw, performing at the Grand Ole Opry and elsewhere. The 1950s were the decade that spanned the years 1950 through 1959, although some sources say from 1951 through 1960. ... The outrageously crowded Woodstock festival epitomized the popular antiwar movement of the 60s. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... The heart and lungs, from an older edition of Grays Anatomy. ... The Grand Ole Opry is a weekly Saturday night country music radio program broadcast live on WSM radio in Nashville, Tennessee. ...


External links

  • [1]

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ferlin Husky - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (337 words)
Ferlin Husky (born December 3, 1925 in Flat River, Missouri) is an American singer who has become well-known as a country-pop chart-topper under various names, including Terry Preston and Simon Crum.
In the 1950s and 60s, Husky had several hits, including "Gone" and "Wings of a Dove", both number ones on the country charts.
In the late 1950s, Husky had a long string of hits, including the #1 "Gone", and he bgan an acting career on the Kraft TV Theatre program and the film Mr.
Ferlin Husky (1080 words)
In 1948 Husky signed with 4-Star Records, in part because he knew that the Maddox Brothers and Rose, one of the dominant West Coast country groups of the 1940s, was signed to that label.
Husky's father, abetted by Capitol Records producer Ken Nelson, had finally convinced Ferlin that his given name had as good a "country" ring as any he might invent.
Husky had few hits in the years that followed, but in 1967 he reached the Top 10 with "Once." And in 1974 he made the charts with two singles: "Freckles and Polliwog Days" and "Champagne Ladies and Blue Ribbon Babies," both written or co-written by his old friend and protege, Dallas Frazier.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m