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Encyclopedia > Ferishta
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Firishta or Ferishta (c. 1560 - c. 1620), given name Muhammad Qasim Hindu Shah was a Persian historian. Firishta was born at Astrabad, on the shores of the Caspian Sea. While he was still a child his father was summoned away from his native country into Hindustan, where he held high office in the Deccan; and by his influence the young Firishta received court promotion. In 1589 Firishta removed to Bijapur, where he spent the remainder of his life under the immediate protection of the shah Ibrahim Adil II, who engaged him to write a history of India. In the introduction to his work a rsum is given of the history of Hindustan prior to the times of the Muhammedan conquest, and also of the victorious progress of the Arabs through the East. The first ten books are each occupied with a history of the kings of one of the provinces; the eleventh book gives an account of the Mussulmans of Malabar; the twelfth a history of the Mussulman saints of India; and the conclusion treats of the geography and climate of India. Firishta is reputed one of the most trustworthy of the Oriental historians, and his work still maintains a high place as an authority. Several portions of it have been translated into English; but the best as well as the most complete translation is that published by General J. Briggs under the title of The History of the Rise of the Mahometan Power in India (London, 1829, 4 vols. 8vo). Several additions were made by Briggs to the original work of Firishta, but he omitted the whole of the twelfth book, and various other passages which had been omitted in the copy from which he translated. Events February 27 - The Treaty of Berhick, which would expel the French from Scotland, is signed by England and the Congregation of Scotland The first tulip bulb was brought from Turkey to the Netherlands. ... Events September 6 - English emigrants on the Mayflower depart from Plymouth, England for the future New England and arrive at the end of the year. ... Persia and Persian can refer to: the Western name for Iran. ... Caspian Sea viewed from orbit The Caspian Sea or Mazandaran Sea is a landlocked sea between Asia and Europe (European Russia). ... Hindustan (Hindi: हिन्दुस्तान [Hindustān], Urdu: [Hindostān], from the Persian Hindū + -stān, archaic Hindoostan) and the adjective Hindustani may relate to various aspects of four geographic areas: Hindustan: Land of the Hindus. ... The Deccan Plateau is a vast plateau in India, encompassing most of Central and Southern India. ... Events Rebellion of the Catholic League against King Henry III of France, in revenge for his murder of Duke Henry of Guise. ... Bijapur is a district in the Indian state of Karnataka. ... The Mughal Empire (Urdu: مغل باد شاہ, Mughal Baadshah, alternative spelling Mogul, which is the origin of the word Mogul) of the Indian Subcontinent, founded by the Mongol leader Babur in 1526, when he defeated Ibrahim Lodi, the last of the Delhi Sultans at the First Battle of Panipat. ... For other uses, see Arab (disambiguation). ... Jump to: navigation, search It has been suggested that Malabarian Coast be merged into this article or section. ... Johnny Briggs is also the name of the actor who plays Mike Baldwin in the soap opera Coronation Street. ... Jump to: navigation, search The clock tower of the Palace of Westminster, which contains Big Ben London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


This article incorporates text from the 1911 Encyclop√¶dia Britannica, which is in the public domain. Supporters contend that the Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1911) represents the sum of human knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century; indeed, it was advertised as such. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


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Mahommed Kasim Ferishta - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (345 words)
While he was still a child his father was summoned away from his native country into Hindustan, where he held high office in the Deccan; and by his influence the young Ferishta received court promotion.
In 1589 Ferishta removed to Bijapur, where he spent the remainder of his life under the immediate protection of the shah Ibrahim Adil Shah II, who engaged him to write a history of India.
Several additions were made by Briggs to the original work of Ferishta, but he omitted the whole of the twelfth book, and various other passages which had been omitted in the copy from which he translated.
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