FACTOID # 22: South Dakota has the highest employment ratio in America, but the lowest median earnings of full-time male employees.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Ferdinand VII of Spain
Fernando VII of Spain
King of Spain
Reign 1813-1833
Born October 14, 1784
El Escorial, Madrid, Spain
Died September 29, 1833 (aged 48)
Predecessor Joseph Bonaparte
Successor Isabella II
Consort Maria Isabel de Bragança
Issue Isabella II
Luisa Fernanda
Royal House House of Bourbon
Father Charles IV of Spain
Mother Maria Louisa of Parma
Spanish House of Bourbon
1700-1833

Philip V
Children
   Louis I
   Ferdinand VI
   Charles III
   Mariana Victoria, Queen of Portugal
   Philip, Duke of Parma
   Teresa, Dauphine of France
   Infante Louis
   Antonia, Queen of Sardinia
Louis I
Ferdinand VI
Charles III
Children
   Infanta Maria Josepha
   Maria Luisa, Holy Roman Empress
   Felipe, Duke of Calabria
   Charles IV
   Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies
   Infante Gabriel
   Infante Antonio
Grandchild of cadet line
   Infante Pedro Carlos
Charles IV
Children
   Charlotte, Queen of Portugal
   Infanta Maria Amelia
   Maria Luisa, Queen of Etruria, Duchess of Parma
   Ferdinand VII
   Carlos, Count of Molina
   Maria Isabella, Queen of the Two Sicilies
   Francis Paula, Duke of Cadiz
Grandchildren of cadet lines
   Carlos, Count of Montemolin
   Juan, Count of Montizón
   Infante Fernando
   Francis, Duke of Cadiz, King Consort of Spain
   Henry, Duke of Sevilla
   Infanta Maria Cristina
   Amelia, Princess of Bavaria
Ferdinand VII
Children
   Isabella II
   Luisa Fernanda, Duchess of Montpensier
Edit

Ferdinand VII (October 14, 1784 - September 29, 1833) was King of Spain from 1813 to 1833. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (450x665, 124 KB) Fernando VII of Spain. ... Year 1813 (MDCCCXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1833 (MDCCCXXXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1784 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... // El Escorial, the Royal Monastery of San Lorenzo El Real (also known as the Monasterio de El Escorial or simply El Escorial) is located about 45 kilometres (28 miles) northwest of the Spanish capital, Madrid. ... Motto: (Spanish for From Madrid to Heaven) Location Coordinates: , Country Spain Autonomous Community Comunidad Autónoma de Madrid Province Madrid Administrative Divisions 21 Neighborhoods 127 Founded 9th century Government  - Mayor Alberto Ruiz-Gallardón Jimémez (PP) Area  - Land 607 km² (234. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1833 (MDCCCXXXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Joseph Bonaparte Joseph Napoleon Bonaparte, King of Naples, King of Spain (January 7, 1768 – July 28, 1844) was the older brother of French Emperor Napoleon I, who made him King of Naples and Sicily (1806–1808) and later King of Spain. ... Isabella II (October 10, 1830 – April 10, 1904), Isabel II in Spanish, was Queen regnant of Spain (Queen of the Spains officially from August 13, 1836, Isabella II the queen of Castile, Leon, Aragon,...) She was born in Madrid, and was the eldest daughter of Ferdinand VII, king of Spain... Maria Isabel of Braganza (Queluz, May 19, 1797-Madrid, November 29, 1818) was a Portuguese infanta daughter of King John VI of Portugal and his wife Carlota Joaquina of Borbón. ... Isabella II (October 10, 1830 – April 10, 1904), Isabel II in Spanish, was Queen regnant of Spain (Queen of the Spains officially from August 13, 1836, Isabella II the queen of Castile, Leon, Aragon,...) She was born in Madrid, and was the eldest daughter of Ferdinand VII, king of Spain... Infanta Doña María Luísa Fernanda of Spain (30 January 1832 - 2 February 1897) was Infanta of Spain and Duchess of Montpensier. ... Also see:  Early Modern France The House of Bourbon is an important European royal house, a branch of the Capetian dynasty. ... Charles IV (November 11, 1748 - January 20, 1819) was King of Spain from December 14, 1788 until his abdication on March 19, 1808. ... Queen Maria Louisa, portrait by Goya Princess Maria Louisa of Parma (December 9, 1751-January 2, 1819) was queen of Spain and consort of King Charles IV of Spain. ... Also see:  Early Modern France The House of Bourbon is an important European royal house, a branch of the Capetian dynasty. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 349 × 598 pixelsFull resolution (1275 × 2186 pixel, file size: 868 KB, MIME type: image/png) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Alfonso XII of Spain Alfonso XIII... King Philip V of Spain (December 19, 1683 – July 9, 1746) or Philippe of Anjou was king of Spain from 1700 to 1746, the first of the Bourbon dynasty in Spain. ... King Louis of Spain - Luis in Spanish (August 25, 1707 – August 31, 1724) was the eldest son of Philip V of Spain by his first Queen consort Maria Louisa of Savoy. ... Ferdinand VI, (September 23, 1713 - August 10, 1759), king of Spain from 1746 until his death, second son of Philip V, founder of the Spanish Bourbon dynasty (as opposed to the French Bourbons), by his first marriage with Maria Louisa of Savoy, was born at Madrid on September 23 1713. ... Charles III of Spain - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Marianne Victoria of Bourbon (March 31, 1718 – January 15, 1781) (in Portuguese Mariana Vitória, in Spanish Mariana Victoria) was the eldest daughter of Philip V of Spain and Elizabeth Farnese. ... Philip of Bourbon, Duke of Parma (March 15, 1720–July 18, 1765) was duke of Parma from 1748 to 1765. ... La dauphine Maria Teresa Rafaela of Spain Maria Teresa Rafaela of Spain (June 11, 1726 - July 22, 1746), was an infanta of Spain and, by her marriage to Louis-Ferdinand, Dauphin of France, was Dauphine of France. ... King Louis of Spain - Luis in Spanish (August 25, 1707 – August 31, 1724) was the eldest son of Philip V of Spain by his first Queen consort Maria Louisa of Savoy. ... Ferdinand VI, (September 23, 1713 - August 10, 1759), king of Spain from 1746 until his death, second son of Philip V, founder of the Spanish Bourbon dynasty (as opposed to the French Bourbons), by his first marriage with Maria Louisa of Savoy, was born at Madrid on September 23 1713. ... Charles III of Spain - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Maria Louisa(Spanish: Maria Luisa, German: Maria Ludovika) (24 November 1745 - 15 May 1792) was Empress consort to Holy Roman Emperor Leopold II. Maria Louisa was born in Portici, in Campania, the site of the summer palace of her parents, King Charles VII and Queen Maria Amalia of Naples and... The Infante Don Philip of Sicily (13 June 1747-19 September 1777). ... Charles IV (November 11, 1748 - January 20, 1819) was King of Spain from December 14, 1788 until his abdication on March 19, 1808. ... King Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies (January 12, 1751 - January 4, 1825). ... Mariana Vitória Josefa or Maria Ana Vitória Josefa (pron. ... Princesa dona Maria Teresa of Braganza (pron. ... Charles IV (November 11, 1748 - January 20, 1819) was King of Spain from December 14, 1788 until his abdication on March 19, 1808. ... Carlota Joaquina Teresa of Spain (25 April or 25 May 1775 - 6 January or 7 January 1830) was the eldest daughter of King Carlos IV of Spain (1748-1819) and his wife Maria Luisa of Parma (1751-1819). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Infante Carlos of Spain Don Carlos María Isidro Benito de Borbón, Infante of Spain (1788-1855) was the second surviving son of King Charles IV of Spain and of his wife, Maria Louisa of Parma. ... Francis I (Francesco Gennaro Giuseppe, August 14, 1777 – November 8, 1830) was King of the Two Sicilies from 1825 to 1830. ... Infante Francisco de Paula, Duke of Cadiz (Francisco de Paula de Borbón, Duque de Cádiz) was born on 10 March 1794 in Madrid, Spain. ... Carlos Luis de Borbón y Braganza, Conde de Montemolín (January 31, 1818 - January 13, 1861) was the Carlist claimant to the throne of Spain under the name Carlos VI since his fathers abdication in 1845, when he took the title of Count of Montemolín. ... Don Juan Carlos Maria Isidro de Borbón, Count of Montizón (French: Jean Charles Marie Isidore de Bourbon, comte de Montizón) (May 15, 1822 – November 21, 1887) was the Carlist claimant to the throne of Spain from 1860 to 1887, and the Legitimist claimant to the throne of... Francis of Assisi of Bourbon (Spanish: Francisco de Asís de Borbón) was born in Aranjuez, Spain on 13 May 1822 and died at Épinay-sur-Seine, France, 17 April 1902). ... Isabella II (October 10, 1830 – April 10, 1904), Isabel II in Spanish, was Queen regnant of Spain (Queen of the Spains officially from August 13, 1836, Isabella II the queen of Castile, Leon, Aragon,...) She was born in Madrid, and was the eldest daughter of Ferdinand VII, king of Spain... Infanta Doña María Luísa Fernanda of Spain (30 January 1832 - 2 February 1897) was Infanta of Spain and Duchess of Montpensier. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1784 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1833 (MDCCCXXXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... It has been suggested that Regents: Iberian States be merged into this article or section. ... Year 1813 (MDCCCXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1833 (MDCCCXXXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


The eldest son of Charles IV, king of Spain, and of his wife Maria Louisa of Parma, he was born in the vast palace of El Escorial near Madrid. Charles IV (November 11, 1748 - January 20, 1819) was King of Spain from December 14, 1788 until his abdication on March 19, 1808. ... Queen Maria Louisa, portrait by Goya Princess Maria Louisa of Parma (December 9, 1751-January 2, 1819) was queen of Spain and consort of King Charles IV of Spain. ... // El Escorial, the Royal Monastery of San Lorenzo El Real (also known as the Monasterio de El Escorial or simply El Escorial) is located about 45 kilometres (28 miles) northwest of the Spanish capital, Madrid. ... Motto: (Spanish for From Madrid to Heaven) Location Coordinates: , Country Spain Autonomous Community Comunidad Autónoma de Madrid Province Madrid Administrative Divisions 21 Neighborhoods 127 Founded 9th century Government  - Mayor Alberto Ruiz-Gallardón Jimémez (PP) Area  - Land 607 km² (234. ...

Contents

Early life

In his youth he occupied the painful position of an heir apparent who was jealously excluded from all share in government by his parents and the royal favorite Manuel de Godoy, his mother's lover. National discontent with a feeble government produced a revolution in 1805. In October 1807, Ferdinand was arrested for his complicity in the conspiracy of the Escorial in which liberal reformers aimed at securing the help of the emperor Napoleon. When the conspiracy was discovered, Ferdinand betrayed his associates and grovelled to his parents. Manuel de Godoy (May 12, 1767 – October 7, 1851), Duke of Alcudia, was a Spanish statesman. ... 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


Abdication and restoration

When his father's abdication was extorted by a popular riot at Aranjuez in March 1808, he ascended the throne but turned again to Napoleon, in the hope that the emperor would support him. He was in his turn forced to make an abdication and imprisoned in France for almost seven years at the Chateau of Valençay in the town of Valençay. Aranjuez is a town in the southern part of Autonomous Community of Madrid in central Spain and is the southernmost, and 48 km south of the city of Madrid. ... Year 1808 (MDCCCVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Chateau de Valençay Château de Valençay is a residence of the dEstampes and Talleyrand-Périgord families in the commune of Valençay, the Indre département of France. ... Chateau Valençay Valençay is a small town amd commune in the Indre département in the Loire Valley of France situated on a hillside overlooking the Nahon river. ...


In March 1814 the Allies returned him to Madrid. The Spanish people, blaming the liberal, enlightened policies of the Francophiles (afrancesados) for incurring the Napoleonic occupation and the Peninsular War, at first welcomed Fernando. Ferdinand soon found that while Spain was fighting for independence in his name and while in his name juntas had governed in Spanish America, a new world had been born of foreign invasion and domestic revolution. Spain was no longer an absolute monarchy under the liberal Constitution of 1812. Ferdinand, in being restored to the throne, guaranteed the liberals that he would govern on the basis of the existing constitution, but, encouraged by conservatives backed by the Church hierarchy, he rejected the constitution within weeks (May 4) and arrested the liberal leaders (May 10), justifying his actions as rejecting a constitution made by the Cortes in his absence and without his consent. Thus he had come back to assert the Bourbon doctrine that the sovereign authority resided in his person only. Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Combatants Kingdom of Spain, United Kingdom, Kingdom of Portugal French Empire The Peninsular War or Spanish War of Independence (Guerra de la Independencia Española) was a war in the Iberian Peninsula. ... The Cortes Generales (Spanish for General Courts) is the legislature of Spain. ... Also see:  Early Modern France The House of Bourbon is an important European royal house, a branch of the Capetian dynasty. ...


Meanwhile, the South American Wars of Independence were under way, though many of the republican rebels would quarrel among themselves and Royalist sentiment was strong in many areas. In the case of the forces led by Bolívar himself, his first permanent victory did not occur until 1817. The Manila galleons and tax revenues from the Spanish Empire were interrupted, and Spain was all but bankrupt. The South American Wars of Independence were waged in South America during the 1810s and 1820s in an effort to liberate the American colonies of Spain and Portugal from colonial rule. ... Monarchism is the advocacy of the establishment, preservation, or restoration of a monarchy. ... “Bolívar” redirects here. ... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Manila Galleons were Spanish galleons that sailed once or twice per year across the Pacific Ocean between Manila in the Philippines and Acapulco in New Spain (now Mexico). ...


Ferdinand's restored autocracy was guided by a small camarilla of his favourites. He changed his ministers every few months, whimsical and ferocious by turns. The other autocratic powers of the Quintuple Alliance, though forced to support him as the representative of legitimacy in Spain, watched his proceedings with disgust and alarm. "The King", wrote Friedrich von Gentz to the hospodar Caradja on December 1, 1814, "himself enters the houses of his first ministers, arrests them, and hands them over to their cruel enemies"; and again, on January 14, 1815, "The king has so debased himself that he has become no more than the leading police agent and gaoler of his country." A camarilla is a group of courtiers or favorites which surround a king or ruler. ... The Quintuple Alliance came into being at the Congress of Aix-la-Chapelle in 1818, when France joined the Quadruple Alliance created by Russia, Austria, Prussia and Britain to uphold the European peace settlement concluded at the Congress of Vienna in 1815. ... Friedrich von Gentz (1764-1832), German publicist and statesman, was born at Breslau on the 2nd of May 1764. ... Hospodar or gospodar is a term of Slavonic origin, meaning lord. The rulers of Wallachia and Moldavia (only occasionally joined) were styled hospodars in Slavic writings from the 15th century to 1866, alongside the title of voivod. ... Ioan Gheorghe Caragea was a phanariot hospodar of Wallachia (reigned 1812-1818). ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ...


As the Spanish king he was the head of the Spanish Order of the Golden Fleece and in this capacity he made the Duke of Wellington the first Protestant member of the order. The founder, Philip the Good , with at least six other Members wearing collars, 1447-8 Philip III, Duke of Burgundy, with the collar of the Order The Order of the Golden Fleece (Spanish: Orden del Toisón de Oro) is an order of chivalry founded in 1430 by Duke Philip... Field Marshal Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, KG, GCB, GCH, PC, FRS (c. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ...


Revolt

In 1820 his misrule provoked a revolt in favor of the Constitution of 1812 which began with a mutiny of the troops under Col. Rafael Riego and the king was quickly made prisoner. He grovelled to the insurgents as he had done to his parents. Ferdinand had restored the Jesuits upon his return; now the Society had become identified with repression and absolutism among the liberals, who attacked them: twenty-five Jesuits were slain in Madrid in 1822. For the rest of the 19th century, expulsions and re-establishment of the Jesuits would continue to be touchmarks of liberal or authoritarian political regimes. 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Rafael del Riego Rafael del Riego y Nuñez (9 April 1784 - 7 November 1823) was a Spanish general and liberal politician. ... Seal of the Society of Jesus. ...


When at the beginning of 1823 as a result of the Congress of Verona the French invaded Spain "invoking the God of St Louis, for the sake of preserving the throne of Spain to a descendant of Henry IV, and of reconciling that fine kingdom with Europe," and in May the revolutionary party carried Ferdinand to Cádiz, he continued to make promises of amendment until he was free. 1823 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Congress of Verona met at Verona on October 20, 1822 as the last of the series of international conferences or congresses that opened with the Congress of Vienna in 1815. ... Henry IV of France, also Henry III of Navarre (13 December 1553 – 14 May 1610), ruled as King of France from 1589 to 1610 and King of Navarre from 1572 to 1610. ... Location Location of Cádiz Coordinates : Time Zone : General information Native name Cádiz (Spanish) Spanish name Cádiz Postal code – Website http://www. ...


When freed after the Battle of Trocadero and the fall of Cadiz he revenged himself with a ferocity which disgusted his far from liberal allies. In violation of his oath to grant an amnesty he revenged himself, for three years of coercion, by killing on a scale which revolted his "rescuers" and against which the Duke of Angoulême, powerless to interfere, protested by refusing the Spanish decorations offered him for his military services. The Battle of Trocadero August 31, 1823, established the victory of the Ultra-Catholic reaction to the right in the post-Napoleonic period. ...


During his last years Ferdinand's energy was abated. He no longer changed ministers every few months as a sport, and he allowed some of them to conduct the current business of government. His habits of life were telling on him. He became torpid, bloated and horrible to look at. After his fourth marriage, with Maria Christina of Bourbon-Two Sicilies in 1829, he was persuaded by his wife to set aside the law of succession of Philip V, which gave a preference to all the males of the family in Spain over the females. His marriage had brought him only two daughters. The change in the order of succession established by his dynasty in Spain angered a large part of the nation and made civil war, the Carlist Wars, inevitable. Maria Christina, Queen Regent of Spain Maria Christina, Princess of Bourbon-Two Sicilies, Queen of Spain (Maria Cristina Ferdinanda of the Two Sicilies branch of the Royal House of Bourbon) (April 27, 1806–August 22, 1878) was Queen Consort of Spain (1829 to 1833) and Queen Regent of Spain (1833... King Philip V of Spain (December 19, 1683 – July 9, 1746) or Philippe of Anjou was king of Spain from 1700 to 1746, the first of the Bourbon dynasty in Spain. ... The Carlist Wars in Spain were the last major European civil wars in which pretenders fought to establish their claim to a throne. ...


When well he consented to the change under the influence of his wife. When ill he was terrified by priestly advisers who were partisans of his brother Carlos. What his final decision was is perhaps doubtful. His wife was mistress by his death-bed and she could put the words she chose into the mouth of a dead man and could move the dead hand at her will. Ferdinand died on September 29, 1833. Infante Carlos of Spain Don Carlos María Isidro Benito de Borbón, Infante of Spain (1788-1855) was the second surviving son of King Charles IV of Spain and of his wife, Maria Louisa of Parma. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


It had been a frequent saying with the more zealous royalists of Spain that a King must be wiser than his ministers for he was placed on the throne and directed by God. Since the reign of Ferdinand VII no one has maintained this unqualified version of the great doctrine of divine right.


King Ferdinand VII kept a diary during the troubled years 1820-1823 which has been published by the Count de Casa Valencia.


Marriages and Children

Ferdinand VII married four times. In 1802 he married his cousin Princess Maria Antonietta of the Two Sicilies (1784-1806), daughter of Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies and Marie Caroline of Austria. There were no children. Maria Antionietta of Naples (1784-1806) was the daughter of Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies. ... King Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies (January 12, 1751 - January 4, 1825). ... HM Queen Marie Caroline of Naples and Sicily Her Majesty Queen Marie Caroline of Naples and Sicily née Her Imperial & Royal Highness Archduchess Marie Caroline of Austria (13 August 1752- 8 September 1814) was queen consort and de facto ruler of Naples from 1768 to 1799 and from 1799...


In 1816, he married his niece Maria Isabel de Bragança, Princess of Portugal (1797-1818), daughter of his older sister Carlota Joaquina and John VI of Portugal. Their only daughter lived only four months. Maria Isabel of Braganza (Queluz, May 19, 1797-Madrid, November 29, 1818) was a Portuguese infanta daughter of King John VI of Portugal and his wife Carlota Joaquina of Borbón. ... framed|Portugal thumb|Carlota Joaquina - Queen of Portugal and Brazil Carlota Joaquina Teresa of Spain (25 April or May 1775 - 6 or 7 January 1830) was the eldest daughter of King Carlos IV of Spain (1748-1819) and his wife Maria Luisa of Parma (1751-1819). ... John VI, King of Portugal (13 May 1767 – 26 March 1826) KG KGF (Portuguese João, pron. ...


In 1819, he married Princess Maria Josepha of Saxony (1803-1829), daughter of Maximilian, Prince of Saxony and Caroline of Bourbon-Parma. No children were born from this marriage. Maria Josepha of Saxony, Queen consort of Spain Maria Josepha of Saxony (Dresden, 7 December 1803 – Aranjuez, 18 May 1829) was daughter of Prince Maximilian of Saxony (1759-1838) and his first wife, Princess Caroline of Bourbon-Parma (1770-1804), daughter of Duke Ferdinand of Parma. ... Maximilian, Prince of Saxony (13 April 1759 - 3 January 1838) was the fifth son of Frederick Christian, Elector of Saxony and Mary Antonia, Princess of Bavaria. ... Categories: Bourbon-Parma | Italian history | Italian nobility | Political families | Parma | Piazenca ...


Lastly, in 1829, he married another niece, Maria Christina of Bourbon-Two Sicilies (1806–1878), daughter of his younger sister Maria Isabella of Spain and Francis I of the Two Sicilies. She bore him two daughters: Maria Christina, Queen Regent of Spain Maria Christina, Princess of Bourbon-Two Sicilies, Queen of Spain (Maria Cristina Ferdinanda of the Two Sicilies branch of the Royal House of Bourbon) (April 27, 1806–August 22, 1878) was Queen Consort of Spain (1829 to 1833) and Queen Regent of Spain (1833... Francis I (Francesco Gennaro Giuseppe, August 14, 1777 – November 8, 1830) was King of the Two Sicilies from 1825 to 1830. ... Francis I (Francesco Gennaro Giuseppe, August 14, 1777 – November 8, 1830) was King of the Two Sicilies from 1825 to 1830. ...

Isabella II (October 10, 1830 – April 10, 1904), Isabel II in Spanish, was Queen regnant of Spain (Queen of the Spains officially from August 13, 1836, Isabella II the queen of Castile, Leon, Aragon,...) She was born in Madrid, and was the eldest daughter of Ferdinand VII, king of Spain... Infanta Doña María Luísa Fernanda of Spain (30 January 1832 - 2 February 1897) was Infanta of Spain and Duchess of Montpensier. ...

Ancestors

Ferdinand's ancestors in three generations
Ferdinand VII of Spain Father:
Charles IV of Spain
Paternal Grandfather:
Charles III of Spain
Paternal Great-Grandfather:
Philip V of Spain
Paternal Great-grandmother:
Elisabeth of Parma
Paternal Grandmother:
Maria Amalia of Saxony
Paternal Great-Grandfather:
Augustus III of Poland
Paternal Great-Grandmother:
Maria Josepha of Austria
Mother:
Maria Luisa of Parma
Maternal Grandfather:
Philip, Duke of Parma
Maternal Great-Grandfather:
Philip V of Spain
Maternal Great-Grandmother:
Elisabeth of Parma
Maternal Grandmother:
Princess Louise-Élisabeth of France
Maternal Great-grandfather:
Louis XV of France
Maternal Great-Grandmother:
Maria Leszczyńska
Spanish Dollar of Ferdinand VII, dated 1821
Obverse. The Latin inscription is FERDIN[ANDUS] VII DEI GRATIA 1821 ("Ferdinand VII, By the Grace of God, 1821"). Reverse. The Latin inscription is HISPAN[IARUM] ET IND[IARUM] REX M[EXICO] 8 R[EALES] ("King of the Spains and of the Indies, Mexico City Mint, 8 Reales.") The reverse also depicts the arms of Castile and León, with Granada in base, and an inescutcheon of Anjou, supported by the Pillars of Hercules).

Charles IV (November 11, 1748 - January 20, 1819) was King of Spain from December 14, 1788 until his abdication on March 19, 1808. ... Charles III of Spain - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... King Philip V of Spain (December 19, 1683 – July 9, 1746) or Philippe of Anjou was king of Spain from 1700 to 1746, the first of the Bourbon dynasty in Spain. ... Elisabetta Farnese, queen of Spain Elizabeth Farnese (October 22, 1692 – July 11, 1766), Queen consort of Spain, also known as Isabel de Farnesio or Isabella Farnese, was the only daughter of Odoardo II Farnese. ... Maria Amalia of Saxony. ... Reign From 1734 until October 5, 1763 Elected In 1734 in Wola, today suburb of Warsaw, Poland Coronation On January 17, 1734 in the Wawel Cathedral, Kraków, Poland Royal House Wettin Parents August II Mocny ? Consorts Marie Josepha Children Frederick Christian Date of Birth October 7, 1696 Place of... Archduchess Maria Josefa of Austria, Queen of Poland. ... Maria Louise of Parma (December 9, 1751-January 2, 1819) was queen of Spain and consort of King Charles IV of Spain. ... Philip of Bourbon, Duke of Parma (March 15, 1720–July 18, 1765) was duke of Parma from 1748 to 1765. ... King Philip V of Spain (December 19, 1683 – July 9, 1746) or Philippe of Anjou was king of Spain from 1700 to 1746, the first of the Bourbon dynasty in Spain. ... Elisabetta Farnese, queen of Spain Elizabeth Farnese (October 22, 1692 – July 11, 1766), Queen consort of Spain, also known as Isabel de Farnesio or Isabella Farnese, was the only daughter of Odoardo II Farnese. ... Louise-Élisabeth of France and her daught y su hija Luisa Isabel de Borbón-Parma. ... Louis XV, called the Beloved (French: le Bien-Aimé) (February 15, 1710 – May 10, 1774), ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1715 until his death. ... Noble Family LeszczyÅ„ski Coat of Arms Wieniawa Parents Stanislaw LeszczyÅ„ski Katarzyna OpaliÅ„ska Consorts Louis XV of France Children with Louis XV of France Louise-Elisabeth Henriette-Anne Marie-Louise Louis (dauphin) Philippe Adélaïde Victoire-Louise Sophie-Philippine Thérèse-Félicité Louise-Marie Date... The Spanish dollar or peso (literally, weight) is a silver coin that was minted in the Spanish Empire after a Spanish currency reform in 1497. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 419 pixelsFull resolution (1016 × 532 pixel, file size: 266 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Silver Spanish Dollar of Ferdinand VII. I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Capital Valladolid Official language(s) Spanish/Castilian Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked  94,223 km²  18. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Assessment of the Encyclopædia Britannica 1911

We have to distinguish the part of Ferdinand VII in all these transactions, in which other and better men were concerned. It can confidently be said to have been uniformly base. He had perhaps no right to complain that he was kept aloof from all share in government while only heir apparent, for this was the traditional practice of his family. But as heir to the throne he had a right to resent the degradation of the crown he was to inherit, and the power of a favourite who was his mother's lover. If he had put himself at the head of a popular rising he would have been followed, and would have had a good excuse. His course was to enter on dim intrigues at the instigation of his first wife, Maria Antonietta of Naples. After her death in 1806 he was drawn into other intrigues by flatterers. At Valancay, where he was sent as a prisoner of state, he sank contentedly into vulgar vice, and scruples did not deter him from applauding the French victories over the people who were suffering unutterable misery in his cause.
Ferdinand VII of Spain
Cadet branch of the Capetian dynasty
Born: 14 October 1784 Died: 29 September 1833
Regnal titles
Preceded by
Joseph I
King of Spain
18131833
Succeeded by
Isabella II
Preceded by
Prince Charles
Prince of Asturias
1788-1808
Vacant
Title next held by
Princess Isabella

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ferdinand VII of Spain (1149 words)
Ferdinand VII (October 14, 1784 - September 29, 1833) was King of Spain from 1813 to 1833.
Ferdinand soon found that while Spain was fighting for independence in his name and while in his name juntas had governed in Spanish America, a new world had been born of foreign invasion and domestic revolution.
Ferdinand had restored the Jesuits upon his return; now the Society had become identified with repression and absolutism among the liberals, who attacked them: twenty-five Jesuits were slain in Madrid in 1822.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m