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Encyclopedia > Ferdinand Magellan
Ferdinand Magellan

Portuguese maritime explorer
Born Spring 1480
Sabrosa, Portugal
Died April 27, 1521
Cebu, Philippines

Ferdinand Magellan (Portuguese: Fernão de Magalhães, pronounced [fɨɾˈnɐ̃ũ dɨ mɐgɐˈʎɐ̃ĩʃ]/; Spanish: Fernando or Hernando de Magallanes); (Spring 1480April 27, 1521, Mactan Island, Cebu, Philippines) was a Portuguese maritime explorer who while in the service of the Spanish crown, tried to find a westward route to the Spice Islands of Indonesia. This was the first known successful attempt to circumnavigate the Earth. He did not complete his final westward voyage; he was killed during the Battle of Mactan in the Philippines. As he died farther west than the Spice Islands, which he had visited on earlier voyages from the west, he became one of the first individuals to cross all the meridians of the globe. He was the first person to lead an expedition sailing westward from Europe to Asia and to cross the Pacific Ocean. The Ferdinand Magellan is a former Pullman Company observation car which served as Presidential Rail Car, U.S. Number 1 from 1943 until 1958. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 471 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1030 × 1312 pixel, file size: 671 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Faithful reproductions of two-dimensional original works cannot attract copyright in the U.S. according to the rule in Bridgeman Art Library v. ... The era of European sea explorations began in the late 15th century and lasted for a little more than three full centuries. ... Look up spring in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Events March 6 - Treaty of Toledo - Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain recognize African conquests of Afonso of Portugal and he cedes the Canary Islands to Spain Great standing on the Ugra river - Muscovy becomes independent from the Golden Horde. ... Sabrosa (pron. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 3 - Pope Leo X excommunicates Martin Luther in the papal bull Decet Romanum Pontificem. ... Cebu is an island province of the Philippines located in the Central Visayas region. ... Events March 6 - Treaty of Toledo - Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain recognize African conquests of Afonso of Portugal and he cedes the Canary Islands to Spain Great standing on the Ugra river - Muscovy becomes independent from the Golden Horde. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 3 - Pope Leo X excommunicates Martin Luther in the papal bull Decet Romanum Pontificem. ... Marcelo Fernan Bridge The image above is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Cebu is an island province of the Philippines located in the Central Visayas region. ... The era of European sea explorations began in the late 15th century and lasted for a little more than three full centuries. ... Coat of Arms of the King of Spain King of Spain redirects here. ... Spice Islands most commonly refers to the Maluku Islands (formerly the Moluccas), which lie on the equator, between Sulawesi (Celebes) and New Guinea in what is now Indonesia. ... To circumnavigate a place, such as an island, a continent, or the Earth is to travel all the way around it by boat or ship. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ... Combatants Explorers in the service of Spain Visayan natives of Mactan Commanders Ferdinand Magellan† Lapu-Lapu Strength 49 men including Magellan on shore, at least 11 others in boats 1,500+(controversial account by pigafetta) 200+ is more accurate because the population then was really small and the barangay then... Spice Islands most commonly refers to the Maluku Islands (formerly the Moluccas), which lie on the equator, between Sulawesi (Celebes) and New Guinea in what is now Indonesia. ... On the earth, a meridian is a north-south line between the North Pole and the South Pole. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ...


Magellan should also be recognized as the first European explorer to enter the Pacific from the Strait of Magellan, which he discovered. He is also remembered as the first European to reach the archipelago of what is now known as the Philippines, which was unknown to the western world before his landing. Arab traders had established commerce within the archipelago centuries earlier. A map of the Strait of Magellan The Strait of Magellan is a navigable sea route immediately south of mainland Chile, South America and north of Isla Grande de Tierra del Fuego. ...


Of the 270 crew members who set out with Magellan to circumnavigate the earth, only 18 completed the circumnavigation of the globe and managed to return to Spain.[1][2] They were led by Spaniard Juan Sebastián Elcano, who took over command of the expedition after Magellan's death. Juan Sebastián Elcano Juan Sebastián Elcano statue in Guetaria For the Spanish training ship, see Juan Sebastián Elcano (Spanish ship). ...

Contents

Spanish search of the Spice Islands

The aim of Christopher Columbus' voyage to the West was to reach the coasts of the Spice Islands (or the Indies) and to establish commercial relations between Spain and the several Asian kingdoms. The Spanish soon realised after Columbus' voyages that the lands of the Americas were not a part of Asia, but a new continent. Once Vasco da Gama and the Portuguese arrived in India in 1498, it became urgent for Spain to find a new commercial route to Asia. The Treaty of Tordesillas reserved for Portugal the routes that went around Africa. The Spanish Crown then decided to send out exploration voyages in order to find a way to Asia by travelling westwards. Vasco Núñez de Balboa sailed the Pacific Ocean in 1513, and Juan Díaz de Solís died in Río de la Plata some years later trying to find a passage in South America. Christopher Columbus (1451 – May 20, 1506) was a navigator, colonizer, and explorer and one of the first Europeans to explore the Americas after the Vikings. ... The Indies, on the display globe of the Field Museum, Chicago, Illinois The Indies or East Indies (or East India) is a term used to describe lands of South and Southeast Asia, occupying all of the former British India, the present Indian Union, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, the Maldives... For other uses, see Vasco da Gama (disambiguation). ... Cantino planisphere of 1502 depicting the meridian designated by the treaty. ... Vasco Núñez De Balboa (1475–January 15, 1519) was a Spanish explorer, governor, and conquistador. ... Juan Díaz de Solís, (Lebrija, Seville, 1470 – Rio de la Plata, 1516), Spanish navigator and explorer. ... This page is about the South American estuary. ...


When Magellan arrived at the Court of Spain, he presented King Charles V with a plan which would bring the ships of the Crown of Castile full access to the lands of the Spice Islands. For the Carlist claimant King Carlos V, see Infante Carlos, Count of Molina. ... The starting point of Crown of Castile can be considered when the union of the Kingdoms of Castile and Leon in 1230 or the later fusion of their Cortes (their Parlaments). ...


Journey

The arrow points to the city of Sanlúcar de Barrameda on the delta of the Guadalquivir River, in Andalusia.
The arrow points to the city of Sanlúcar de Barrameda on the delta of the Guadalquivir River, in Andalusia.

On August 10, 1519, five ships under Magellan's command – Trinidad, San Antonio, Concepción, Victoria, and Santiago – left Seville and travelled from the Guadalquivir River to Sanlúcar de Barrameda at the mouth of the river, where they remained more than five weeks. Image File history File links AndalusAndMorocco. ... Image File history File links AndalusAndMorocco. ... Sanlúcar de Barrameda from the mouth of the Guadalquivir river Sanlúcar de Barrameda is a Spanish city in the northwestern part of the Cádiz province. ... Guadalquivir is one of the major rivers of Spain. ... For other uses, see Andalusia (disambiguation). ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 4 - Hernán Cortés lands in Mexico. ... The Victoria was one of the five ships of Ferdinand Magellan. ... The Guadalquivir is the second longest river in Spain (after the Tagus). ...


Spanish authorities were wary of the Portuguese Magellan, almost prevented the admiral from sailing, and switched his crew of mostly Portuguese men with men of Spain. Nevertheless, Magellan set sail from Sanlúcar de Barrameda with about 270 men on September 20. King Manuel ordered a Portuguese naval detachment to pursue Magellan, but Magellan avoided them. After stopping at the Canary Islands, Magellan arrived at Cape Verde, where he set course for Cape St. Augustine in Brazil. On November 27, the expedition crossed the equator; on December 6, the crew sighted South America. Manuel I of Portugal (pron. ... Anthem: Arrorró Capital Las Palmas de Gran Canaria and Santa Cruz de Tenerife Official language(s) Spanish Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 13th  7,447 km²  1. ... World map showing the equator in red In tourist areas, the equator is often marked on the sides of roads The equator marked as it crosses Ilhéu das Rolas, in São Tomé and Príncipe. ...

Magellan's ship Victoria
Magellan's ship Victoria

Since Brazil was Portuguese territory, Magellan avoided it, and on December 13 anchored near present-day Rio de Janeiro. There the crew was resupplied, but bad conditions caused them to delay. Afterwards, they continued to sail south along South America's east coast, looking for the strait that Magellan believed would lead to the Spice Islands. The fleet reached Río de la Plata on January 10, 1520. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (788x759, 1504 KB) ÄŒesky | Deutsch | English | Ελληνικά | Español | فارسی | Français | עברית | Indonesian | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | Magyar | Nederlands | Polski | Português | RomânÇŽ | Русский | Slovenščina | Српски | Sunda | 简体中文 | 正體中文 | Türkçe | Русский | Українська +/- File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (788x759, 1504 KB) ÄŒesky | Deutsch | English | Ελληνικά | Español | فارسی | Français | עברית | Indonesian | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | Magyar | Nederlands | Polski | Português | RomânÇŽ | Русский | Slovenščina | Српски | Sunda | 简体中文 | 正體中文 | Türkçe | Русский | Українська +/- File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other... This article is about the Brazilian city. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... This page is about the South American estuary. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1520 (MDXX) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ...


On March 30, the crew established a settlement that they called Puerto San Julian. On April 2, a mutiny involving two of the five ship captains broke out, but it was unsuccessful because the crew remained loyal. Sebastian del Cano was one of those who were forgiven. Antonio Pigafetta, a wealthy Venetian tourist who paid to be on the Magellan voyage, related that Gaspar Quesada, the captain of Concepcion, was executed; Juan de Cartagena, the captain of San Antonio, and a priest named Padre Sanchez dela Reina were instead marooned on the coast. Another account states that Luis de Mendoza, the captain of Victoria, was executed along with Quesada.[3] Reportedly those killed were drawn and quartered and impaled on the coast; years later, their bones were found by Sir Francis Drake.[citation needed] Puerto San Julián, also known historically as Port St Julian, is a natural harbour in Patagonia in the Santa Cruz Province of Argentina located at , near the entrance to the Strait of Magellan. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Antonio Pigafetta. ... Borders of the Republic of Venice in 1796 Capital Venice Language(s) Venetian, Latin, Italian Religion Roman Catholic Government Republic Doge  - 1789–97 Ludovico Manin History  - Established 697  - Treaty of Zara June 27, 1358  - Treaty of Leoben April 17, 1797 * Traditionally, the establishment of the Republic is dated to 697. ... This article is about religious workers. ... Marooning is the act of leaving someone behind intentionally in an uninhabited area. ... Drawing and quartering was part of the penalty anciently ordained in England for treason. ... For other uses, see impale. ... This article is about the Elizabethan naval commander. ...

The Strait of Magellan cuts through the southern tip of South America connecting the Atlantic Ocean and Pacific Ocean.
The Strait of Magellan cuts through the southern tip of South America connecting the Atlantic Ocean and Pacific Ocean.

The journey resumed. The Santiago was sent down the coast on a scouting expedition and was wrecked in a sudden storm. All of its crew survived and made it safely to shore. Two of them returned overland to inform Magellan of what had happened, and bring rescue to their comrades. After this experience, Magellan decided to wait for a few weeks more before again resuming the voyage. Download high resolution version (1009x805, 135 KB)A map of the Straits of Magellan. ... Download high resolution version (1009x805, 135 KB)A map of the Straits of Magellan. ... A map of the Strait of Magellan The Strait of Magellan is a navigable sea route immediately south of mainland Chile, South America and north of Isla Grande de Tierra del Fuego. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ...


At 52°S latitude on October 21, the fleet reached Cape Virgenes and concluded they had found the passage, because the waters were brine and deep inland. Four ships began an arduous trip through the 373-mile (600 km) long passage that Magellan called the Estrecho (Canal) de Todos los Santos, ("All Saints' Channel"), because the fleet travelled through it on November 1, or All Saints' Day. The strait is now named the Strait of Magellan. Magellan first assigned Concepcion and San Antonio to explore the strait, but the latter, commanded by Gomez, deserted and returned to Spain on November 20. On November 28, the three remaining ships entered the South Pacific. Magellan named the waters the Mar Pacifico (Pacific Ocean) because of its apparent stillness.[4] Magellan was the first European to reach Tierra del Fuego just east of the Pacific side of the strait. Categories: Argentina geography stubs | Headlands | Geography of Argentina ... For the sports equipment manufacturer, see Brine, Corp. ... All Saints in Poland The festival of All Saints, also sometimes known as All Hallows, or Hallowmas, is a feast celebrated in honour of all the saints and martyrs, known or unknown. ... A map of the Strait of Magellan The Strait of Magellan is a navigable sea route immediately south of mainland Chile, South America and north of Isla Grande de Tierra del Fuego. ... For other uses, see Oceania (disambiguation). ... Tierra del Fuego Cerro Sombrero Village, Chile. ...


Death

Monument in Lapu-Lapu City, Cebu, Philippines that marks the site where Magellan was reportedly killed.
Monument in Lapu-Lapu City, Cebu, Philippines that marks the site where Magellan was reportedly killed.

Heading northwest, the crew reached the equator on February 13, 1521. On March 6, they reached the Marianas and Guam. Magellan called Guam the "Island of Sails" because they saw a lot of sailboats. They renamed it to "Ladrones Island" (Island of Thieves) because many of Trinidad's small boats were stolen there. On March 16, Magellan reached the island of Homonhon in the Philippines, with 150 crew left, and became the first European to reach the Philippines. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (768x1024, 117 KB) Summary This monument in Lapu-Lapu City marks the site where Magellan was purportedly killed in 1521. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (768x1024, 117 KB) Summary This monument in Lapu-Lapu City marks the site where Magellan was purportedly killed in 1521. ... Lapu-Lapu City is a 1st class city in the province of Cebu, Philippines. ... For other uses, see Cebu (disambiguation). ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 3 - Pope Leo X excommunicates Martin Luther in the papal bull Decet Romanum Pontificem. ... Mariana Islands (sometimes called The Marianas; up to the early 20th century sometimes called the Ladrone Islands) are a group of islands made up by the summits of 15 volcanic mountains in the Pacific Ocean. ... Homonhon Island is an island in the province of Eastern Samar, Philippines, on the west side of Leyte Gulf. ...


Magellan was able to communicate with the native peoples because his Malay interpreter, Enrique, could understand their language. Enrique was indentured by Magellan during his earlier voyages to Malacca, and was at his side during the battles in Africa, during Magellan's disgrace at the King's court in Portugal, and during Magellan's successful raising of a fleet. They traded gifts with Rajah Kolambu of Limasawa, who guided them to Cebu on April 7. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... An Indentured servant is an unfree labourer under contract to work (for a specified amount of time) for another person, often without any pay, but in exchange for accommodation, food, other essentials and/or free passage to a new country. ... State motto: Bersatu Teguh (Malay, United We Stand) Capital Malacca Town Governor Tun Datuk Seri Utama Mohd Khalil Yaakob Chief Minister Datuk Seri Haji Mohd Ali Mohd Rustam Area 1,650 km² Population  - Estimated 648,500 State anthem Melaka Maju Jaya This article is about a state in Malaysia. ... For other uses, see Raja (disambiguation). ... In 1521, Rajah Calambu of Limasawa Island in the Philippines managed to guide the ships of Magellan, a potential threat, safely past his island to the more powerful chieftain on Cebu, where Magellan landed on April 7, 1521. ... Cebu is an island of the Philippines. ...


Rajah Humabon of Cebu was friendly to Magellan, and he and his queen, Juana, even accepted Christianity. Afterward, Humabon and his rival Datu Zula convinced Magellan to go kill their enemy, Lapu-Lapu, on Mactan. Magellan had wished to convert Lapu-Lapu to Christianity, as he had Rajah Humabon, a proposal to which Lapu-Lapu was dismissive. On the morning of April 17, 1521, Magellan sailed to Mactan with an army of men. During the resulting Battle of Mactan against indigenous forces led by Lapu-Lapu, Magellan was killed. Image:Lapulapumanila. ...


Pigafetta provided the only extant eyewitness account of the events culminating in Magellan's death:

When morning came, forty-nine of us leaped into the water up to our thighs, and walked through water for more than two cross-bow flights before we could reach the shore. The boats could not approach nearer because of certain rocks in the water. The other eleven men remained behind to guard the boats. When we reached land, [the natives] had formed in three divisions to the number of more than one thousand five hundred people. When they saw us, they charged down upon us with exceeding loud cries... The musketeers and crossbow-men shot from a distance for about a half-hour, but uselessly... Recognising the captain, so many turned upon him that they knocked his helmet off his head twice... A native hurled a bamboo spear into the captain's face, but the latter immediately killed him with his lance, which he left in the native's body. Then, trying to lay hand on sword, he could draw it out but halfway, because he had been wounded in the arm with a bamboo spear. When the natives saw that, they all hurled themselves upon him. One of them wounded him on the left leg with a large cutlass, which resembles a scimitar, only being larger. That caused the captain to fall face downward, when immediately they rushed upon him with iron and bamboo spears and with their cutlasses, until they killed our mirror, our light, our comfort, and our true guide. When they wounded him, he turned back many times to see whether we were all in the boats. Thereupon, beholding him dead, we, wounded, retreated, as best we could, to the boats, which were already pulling off.[5]

However, some readings say that Magellan was able to run to his boat, but later died of the battle wounds.


Another story told by the Cebuanos suggest that Magellan was courting a Filipina. The family of the Filipina did not approve. The feud supposedly ended when Magellan was killed by her family.


Magellan provided in his will that Enrique, his interpreter, was to be freed upon his death. However, after Mactan, the remaining ships' masters refused to free Enrique. Enrique escaped his indenture on May 1, with the aid of Rajah Humabon, amid the deaths of almost 30 crewmen. However, Pigafetta had been making notes about the language, and was apparently able to continue communications during the rest of the voyage.


Circumnavigation and return

Magellan's voyage led to Limasawa, Cebu, Mactan, Palawan, Brunei, Celebes and finally to the Spice Islands.
Magellan's voyage led to Limasawa, Cebu, Mactan, Palawan, Brunei, Celebes and finally to the Spice Islands.

The casualties suffered in the Philippines left the expedition with too few men to sail the three remaining ships. Accordingly, on May 2, they abandoned Concepción and burned the ship to ensure it could not be used against them. The fleet, reduced to Trinidad and Victoria, fled westward to Palawan. They left that island on June 21, and were guided to Brunei, Borneo by Moro pilots who could navigate the shallow seas. They anchored off the Brunei breakwater for 35 days, where the Venetian Pigafetta mentioned the splendour of Rajah Siripada's court (gold, two pearls the size of hens' eggs, etc.). In addition, Brunei boasted tame elephants and armament of 62 cannons, more than 5 times the armament of Magellan's ships, and Brunei disdained cloves, which were to prove more valuable than gold, upon the return to Spain. Pigafetta mentions some of the technology of the court, such as porcelain and eyeglasses (both of which were not available or only just becoming available in Europe). Image File history File links Magellans voyage: Cebu, Mactan, Palawan, Brunei, Celebes, Spice Islands on the relief globe of the Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Magellans voyage: Cebu, Mactan, Palawan, Brunei, Celebes, Spice Islands on the relief globe of the Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Cebu is an island of the Philippines. ... Mactan can refer to: Mactan Island Battle of Mactan Mactan-Cebu International Airport This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Palawan is an island province of the Philippines located in the Mimaropa region. ... Map of Sulawesi pictures by Julianto Halim Sulawesi (or Celebes) is a large Indonesian island. ... Spice Islands most commonly refers to the Maluku Islands (formerly the Moluccas), which lie on the equator, between Sulawesi (Celebes) and New Guinea in what is now Indonesia. ... Palawan is an island province of the Philippines located in the Mimaropa region. ... Borneo is the third largest island in the world and is located at the centre of Maritime Southeast Asia. ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... For other uses, see Pearl (disambiguation). ... Genera and Species Loxodonta Loxodonta cyclotis Loxodonta africana Elephas Elephas maximus Elephas antiquus † Elephas beyeri † Elephas celebensis † Elephas cypriotes † Elephas ekorensis † Elephas falconeri † Elephas iolensis † Elephas planifrons † Elephas platycephalus † Elephas recki † Stegodon † Mammuthus † Elephantidae (the elephants) is a family of pachyderm, and the only remaining family in the order Proboscidea... Binomial name (L.) Merrill & Perry A single dried clove flower bud Cloves (Syzygium aromaticum, syn. ... “Fine China” redirects here. ... A pair of modern glasses Glasses, also called eyeglasses or spectacles are frames, bearing lenses worn in front of the eyes normally for vision correction, eye protection, or for protection from UV rays. ...

One of Magellan's ships circumnavigated the globe, finishing 16 months after the explorer's death.
One of Magellan's ships circumnavigated the globe, finishing 16 months after the explorer's death.

After reaching the Maluku Islands (the Spice Islands) on November 6, 115 crew were left. They managed to trade with the Sultan of Tidore, a rival of the Sultan of Ternate, who was the ally of the Portuguese. Image File history File links Magellan's_voyage_EN.svg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Ferdinand Magellan Cebu ... Image File history File links Magellan's_voyage_EN.svg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Ferdinand Magellan Cebu ... Maluku redirects here. ... Tidore is an island and town in the Maluku Islands of eastern Indonesia, just west of the larger island of Halmahera. ... A 1720 depiction of Ternate. ...


The two remaining ships, laden with valuable spices, attempted to return to Spain by sailing west. However, as they left the Spice Islands, Trinidad began to take on water. The crew tried to discover and repair the leak, but failed. They concluded that Trinidad would need to spend considerable time being overhauled, but the small Victoria was not large enough to accommodate all the surviving crew. As a result, Victoria with some of the crew sailed west for Spain. Several weeks later, Trinidad departed and attempted to return to Spain via the Pacific route. This attempt failed. Trinidad was captured by the Portuguese, and was eventually wrecked in a storm while at anchor under Portuguese control.


Victoria set sail via the Indian Ocean route home on December 21, commanded by Juan Sebastián Elcano. By May 6, the Victoria rounded the Cape of Good Hope, with only rice for rations. Twenty crewmen died of starvation before Elcano put into Cape Verde, a Portuguese holding, where he abandoned 13 more crew on July 9 in fear of losing his cargo of 26 tons of spices (cloves and cinnamon). For other uses, see Cape of Good Hope (disambiguation). ... Look up ton in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Binomial name J.Presl Cassia (Chinese cinnamon) is also commonly called (and sometimes sold as) cinnamon. ...


On September 6, 1522, Elcano and the remaining crew of Magellan's voyage arrived in Spain aboard the last ship in the fleet, Victoria,[6] almost exactly three years after they departed. Magellan had not intended to circumnavigate the world, only to find a secure way through which the Spanish ships could navigate to the Spice Islands; it was Elcano who, after Magellan's death, decided to push westward, thereby completing the first voyage around the entire Earth. is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 9 - Adrian Dedens becomes Pope Adrian VI. February 26 - Execution by hanging of Cuauhtémoc, Aztec ruler of Tenochtitlan under orders of conquistador Hernán Cortés. ...


Maximilianus Transylvanus interviewed the surviving members of the expedition when they presented themselves to the Spanish court at Valladolid in the autumn of 1522, and wrote the first account of the voyage, which was published in 1523. The account written by Pigafetta did not appear until 1525, and was not wholly published until the late 18th century. The expedition eked out a small profit, but the crew was not paid full wages.[citation needed] The first edition of Transylvanus account Maximilianus Transylvanus (Transilvanus, Transylvanianus), also Maximilianus of Transylvania and Maximilian (Maximiliaen) von Sevenborgen (ca. ... For the city in Mexico, see Valladolid, Yucatán. ...


Four crewmen of the original 55 on Trinidad finally returned to Spain in 1525; 51 of them had died in war or from disease. In total, approximately 232 Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French, English and German sailors died on the expedition around the world with Magellan.[7]


Legacy

Magellan's expedition was the first to circumnavigate the globe and the first to navigate the strait in South America connecting the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Magellan's crew observed several animals that were entirely new to European science, including a "camel without humps", which could have been a llama, guanaco, vicuña, or alpaca. A black "goose" that had to be skinned instead of plucked was a penguin. For other uses, see Camel (disambiguation). ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) The llama (Lama glama) is a South American camelid, widely used as a pack animal by the Incas[1] and other natives of the Andes mountains. ... Binomial name Lama guanicoe (Müller, 1776) The guanaco (Lama guanicoe) is an elegant, fine-boned camelid animal that stands approximately 1. ... Binomial name (Molina, 1782) The vicuña (Vicugna vicugna) is one of 2 wild South American camelids, along with the guanaco, which live in the high alpineous areas of the Andes. ... This article is about a breed of domesticated ungulates. ... Geese redirects here. ... Modern genera Aptenodytes Eudyptes Eudyptula Megadyptes Pygoscelis Spheniscus For prehistoric genera, see Systematics Some penguins are curious. ...


Two of the closest galaxies, the Magellanic Clouds, were discovered by crew members in the southern hemisphere. The full extent of the Earth was also realised, since their voyage was 14,460 leagues (69,800km or 43,400mi). For other uses, see Galaxy (disambiguation). ... The two Magellanic Clouds are irregular dwarf galaxies that may be orbiting our Milky Way galaxy[1], and thus are members of our Local Group of galaxies. ... southern hemisphere highlighted in yellow (Antarctica not depicted). ... “km” redirects here. ... “Miles” redirects here. ...


Finally, the need for an International Date Line was established. Upon their return they observed a mismatch of one day between their calendars and those who did not travel, even though they faithfully maintained their ship's log. However, they did not have clocks accurate enough to observe the variation in the length of the day during the journey.[8] This phenomenon caused great excitement at the time, to the extent that a special delegation was sent to the Pope to explain this oddity to him. “Date line” redirects here. ...

18 men returned to Seville aboard Victoria in 1522:
Name Rating
Juan Sebastián Elcano, from Getaria Master
Francisco Albo, from Rodas (in Tui, Galicia) Pilot
Miguel de Rodas (in Tui, Galicia) Pilot
Juan de Acurio, from Bermeo Pilot
Antonio Lombardo (Pigafetta), from Vicenza Supernumerary
Martín de Judicibus, from Genoa Chief Steward
Hernándo de Bustamante, from Alcántara Mariner
Nicholas the Greek, from Naples Mariner
Miguel Sánchez, from Rodas (in Tui, Galicia) Mariner
Antonio Hernández Colmenero, from Huelva Mariner
Francisco Rodrigues, Portuguese from Seville Mariner
Juan Rodríguez, from Huelva Mariner
Diego Carmena, from Baiona (Galicia) Mariner
Hans of Aachen Gunner
Juan de Arratia, from Bilbao Able Seaman
Vasco Gómez Gallego, from Baiona (Galicia) Able Seaman
Juan de Santandrés, from Cueto (Cantabria) Apprentice Seaman
Juan de Zubileta, from Barakaldo page

Juan Sebastián Elcano Juan Sebastián Elcano statue in Guetaria For the Spanish training ship, see Juan Sebastián Elcano (Spanish ship). ... Getaria is a town located in the province of Gipuzkoa, in the autonomous community of Basque Country, in the North of Spain. ... Captain Sir Arthur Henry Rostron receiving a loving cup from Margaret Brown for his rescue of RMS Titanic survivors Main article: Seafarers professions and ranks Captain is the traditional customary title given to the person in charge of a ship at sea. ... Tui is a small city located in the southwest of Galicia, Spain. ... left|Signal flag H(Hotel) - Pilot on Board Boarding is tricky, as both vessels are moving and cannot afford to slow down. ... Bermeo is a town located in the province of Bizkaia, in the autonomous community of Basque Country, in the North of Spain. ... Antonio Pigafetta. ... Vicenza is a city in northern Italy, is the capital of the eponymous province in the Veneto region, at the northern base of the Monte Berico, straddling the Bacchiglione. ... Supernumerary is a member of the staff or an employee who works in a public office but is not part of the manpower complement. ... // Martino de Judicibus The text quoted here has been extracted from The Thousand Years of the de Judicibus Italian Lineage, historical anthology about familiar memories going from the origins till now, edited by Danilo de Judicibus, and translated to English by Dario de Judicibus. ... For other uses, see Genoa (disambiguation). ... Roman bridge of Alcántara For other uses, see Alcántara (disambiguation). ... Mariner can refer to The PBM Mariner flying boat The Mariner Space Program An archaic term for sailor This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Location of the city of Naples (red dot) within Italy. ... Huelva is a city in southwestern Spain, the capital of the province of Huelva in the autonomous region of Andalusia. ... For other uses, see Seville (disambiguation). ... Huelva is a city in southwestern Spain, the capital of the province of Huelva in the autonomous region of Andalusia. ... Nickname: Baiona Motto: Official website: http://www. ... Oche redirects here; in darts the oche is the line from which players must throw. ... Gunner refers to a rank in the Royal Artillery, or can refer to anyone whose main job is to operate a gun. ... La Muy Noble y Muy Leal e Invicta (The most noble and most loyal and undefeated) Location Location of Bilbao in Spain and Biscay Coordinates : , Time zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer : CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Bilbao (Basque) Spanish name Bilbao Nickname El Botxo (the hole) Founded 15... ABLE is a simplified programming language targeted at accounting applications. ... This article is about a military rank. ... For the Mesozoic island Cantabria, see Cantabria (Mesozoic island). ... If youre looking for the TV show, see The Apprentice. ... Coat of arms Location of Barakaldo in Biscay. ... A page is a young male servant. ...

See also

// List of major battles Battle of Manila Battle of Bataan Battle of Mactan Battle of Corregidor Battle of Luzon Battle of Leyte Battle of Pulang Lupa Balangiga Massacre Small Wars Wars with local Islamic Extremists Wars with local Communist Insurgents Foreign Service International Force East Timor see INTERFET UN Transitional... The history of the Philippines begins with the arrival of the first humans in the Philippines by land bridges at least 30,000 years ago. ... This article attempts to list every significant event in the history of the European exploration of Asia. ... The so-called Age of Exploration was a period from the early 15th century and continuing into the early 17th century, during which European ships were traveled around the world to search for new trading routes and partners to feed burgeoning capitalism in Europe. ... An anachronous map of the Portuguese Empire (1415-1999). ... An anachronous map of the overseas Spanish Empire (1492-1898) in red, and the Spanish Habsburg realms in Europe (1516-1714) in orange. ...

References and footnotes

  1. ^ Swenson, Tait M.. First Circumnavigation of the Globe by Magellan 1519-1522. The Web Chronology project. Retrieved on 2006-03-14.
  2. ^ age of exploration. The Mariners' Museum. Retrieved on 2006-03-14.
  3. ^ Catholic Encyclopedia on CD-ROM: Ferdinand Magellan. Retrieved on January 14, 2007.
  4. ^ Szpytman, John. Ferdinand Magellan. Catholic Encyclopedia. Retrieved on 2006-03-14.
  5. ^ The Death of Magellan, 1521, EyeWitness to History (2001). Retrieved 2006-03-09.
  6. ^ Juan Sebastian Elcano. Edited Appletons Encyclopedia. Retrieved on 2006-03-10.
  7. ^ NNDB: Ferdinand Magellan. Retrieved on 2006-11-19.
  8. ^ Maps of the Magellan Strait and a brief history of Ferdinand Magellan. London, UK. Retrieved 2006-03-10.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • Magellan (Francis Guillemard, Antonio Pigafetta, Francisco Albo, Gaspar Correa); London : Viartis [2008] - includes all of the contemporary accounts of Magellan's voyage
  • Laurence Bergreen, Over the Edge of the World: Magellan's Terrifying Circumnavigation of the Globe, New York: HarperCollins, [2003] ISBN 0-06-621173-5.
  • Lord Stanley of Alderley, The first voyage round the world, by Magellan, London: Hakluyt, [1874], six contemporary accounts of his voyage

Lord Stanley of Alderley, Henry Edward John Stanley, 3rd Baron Stanley of Alderley and 2nd Baron Eddisbury (11 July 1827–10 December 1903) was a historian who translated The first voyage round the world by Magellan and other works from the Age of Discovery. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Ferdinand Magellan
  • Appleton's Biography edited by Stanley L. Klos
  • Magellan's untimely demise on Cebu in the Philippines from History House.
  • Lists of crew members :
    • 107 people
      • The 18 arriving on Victoria
    • Encyclopaedia Britannica Ferdinand Magellan
    • A picture of the 1522 disembarkment with names of the 18
Persondata
NAME Magellan, Ferdinand
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Magalhães, Fernão de (Portuguese); Magallanes, Fernando de (Spanish)
SHORT DESCRIPTION Sea explorer
DATE OF BIRTH Spring 1480
PLACE OF BIRTH Sabrosa, Portugal
DATE OF DEATH April 27, 1521
PLACE OF DEATH Mactan Island, Cebu, Philippines

  Results from FactBites:
 
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Ferdinand Magellan (1205 words)
Magellan took the oath of allegiance in the church of Santa María de la Victoria de Triana in Seville, and received the imperial standard.
The voyage was resumed on 24 August, and on 21 October the fleet reached Cape Virgenes and, with it, the entrance to the long-sought straits.
Magellan wished to subdue the neighbouring Island of Mactan and was killed there, 27 April, by the poisoned arrows of the natives.
Ferdinand Magellan - Academic Kids (2583 words)
Magellan was born in Sabrosa (near Vila Real, in the province of Tr᳭dos-Montes of north Portugal) or in Porto.
Magellan was able to communicate with the native peoples because his Malay interpreter could understand their language.
Magellan died in the Philippines on April 27 in the Battle of Mactan against indigenous forces led by Lapu-Lapu.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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