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Encyclopedia > Ferdinand II of the Two Sicilies
Ferdinand II
King of the Two Sicilies
Reign 8 November 1830-22 May 1859
Born 12 January 1810
Died 22 May 1859
Predecessor Francis I
Successor Francis II
Consort Maria Christina of Savoy
Archduchess Maria Theresa of Austria
Issue Prince Francis
Prince Lodovico
Prince Albert Maria
Prince Alfonso
Princess Maria Annuziata
Princess Immaculata
Prince Gaetan
Prince Giuseppe Maria
Princess Maria Pia delle Grazie
Prince Vincenzo
Prince Pasquale Baylen
Princess Maria Immacolata
Prince Gennaro Maria
Royal House Bourbon
Father Francis I of the Two Sicilies
Mother Maria Isabella of Spain


Ferdinand II (Ferdinando Carlo, January 12, 1810May 22, 1859) was the King of the Two Sicilies (Southern Italy) from 1830 until his death. Image File history File links Ferdinando_II_delle_Due_Sicilie. ... November 8 is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 53 days remaining. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... May 22 is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... January 12 is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... May 22 is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Francis I (Francesco Gennaro Giuseppe, August 14, 1777 – November 8, 1830) was King of the Two Sicilies from 1825 to 1830. ... Francis II (Francesco dAssisi Maria Leopoldo, January 16, 1836 – December 27, 1894), was King of the Two Sicilies from 1859 to 1861. ... Maria Christina (Carlotta Giuseppina Gaetana Elisa) of Savoy (14 November 1812, Cagliari - 21 January 1836, Caserta) was the first Queen consort of Ferdinand II of the Two Sicilies. ... Archduchess Maria Theresa (Isabella) of Austria (31 July 1816, Vienna - 8 August 1867, Albano) was the second Queen consort of Ferdinand II of the Two Sicilies. ... Francis II (Francesco dAssisi Maria Leopoldo, January 16, 1836 – December 27, 1894), was King of the Two Sicilies from 1859 to 1861. ... Lodovico, Count of Trani (1 August 1838, Naples - 8 June 1886, Paris) was the eldest son of Ferdinand II of the Two Sicilies and his second wife Archduchess Maria Theresa of Austria. ... Infante Alfonso, Duke of Calabria (30 November 1901- 3 February 1964), was one of two claimants to the title of the head of House of Bourbon Two Sicilies from 1960 till his death. ... Also see:  Early Modern France The House of Bourbon is an important European royal house. ... Francis I (Francesco Gennaro Giuseppe, August 14, 1777 – November 8, 1830) was King of the Two Sicilies from 1825 to 1830. ... Francis I (Francesco Gennaro Giuseppe, August 14, 1777 – November 8, 1830) was King of the Two Sicilies from 1825 to 1830. ... January 12 is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... May 22 is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Two Sicilies The Kingdom of the Two Sicilies (Italian: il Regno delle Due Sicilie) was the new name that the Bourbon King Ferdinand IV of Naples bestowed upon his domain (including Southern Italy and the island of Sicily) after the end of the Napoleonic Era and the full restoration... Southern Italy, often referred to in Italian as the Mezzogiorno (a term first used in 19th century in comparison with French Midi ) encompasses six of the countrys 20 regions: Basilicata Campania Calabria Puglia Sicilia Sardinia Sicilia although it is geographically and administratively included in Insular Italy, it has a... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...

Contents

Family

Ferdinand was born in Palermo, the son of King Francis I of the Two Sicilies and his wife and first cousin Maria Isabella of Spain. For other uses, see Palermo (disambiguation). ... Francis I (Francesco Gennaro Giuseppe, August 14, 1777 – November 8, 1830) was King of the Two Sicilies from 1825 to 1830. ... Francis I (Francesco Gennaro Giuseppe, August 14, 1777 – November 8, 1830) was King of the Two Sicilies from 1825 to 1830. ...


His paternal grandparents were King Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies and Queen Marie Caroline of Austria. His maternal grandparents were Charles IV of Spain and Maria Luisa of Parma. King Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies (January 12, 1751 - January 4, 1825). ... HM Queen Marie Caroline of Naples and Sicily Her Majesty Queen Marie Caroline of Naples and Sicily née Her Imperial & Royal Highness Archduchess Marie Caroline of Austria (13 August 1752- 8 September 1814) was queen consort and de facto ruler of Naples from 1768 to 1799 and from 1799... Charles IV (November 11, 1748 - January 20, 1819) was King of Spain from December 14, 1788 until his abdication on March 19, 1808. ... Maria Louise of Parma (December 9, 1751-January 2, 1819) was queen of Spain and consort of King Charles IV of Spain. ...


Ferdinand I and Charles IV were brothers, both sons of Charles III of Spain and Maria Amalia of Saxony. Charles III of Spain - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Maria Amalia of Saxony. ...


Early reign

In his early years he was fairly popular. Progressives credited with Liberal ideas and in addition, his free and easy manners endeared him to the so-called lazzaroni, the lower classes of Neapolitan society. Look up liberal on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Political progressivism, a political ideology that is for change, often associated with liberal movements Liberty, the condition of being free from control or restrictions Liberal Party, members of...


On succeeding to the throne in 1830, he published an edict in which he promised to give his most anxious attention to the impartial administration of justice, to reform the finances, and to use every effort to heal the wounds which had afflicted the Kingdom for so many years. His goal, he said, was to govern his Kingdom in a way that would bring the greatest happiness to the greatest number of his subjects while respecting the rights of his fellow monarchs and those of the Roman Catholic Church. Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic Church...


The early years of his reign were comparatively peaceful: he cut taxes and expenditures, had the first railway in Italy built (between Naples and the royal palace at Portici), his fleet had the first steamship in the Italian Peninsula, and he had telegraphic connections established between Naples and Palermo (Sicily). “Napoli” redirects here. ... Portici is a city of Campania, Italy, in the Province of Naples, 5 miles southeast of Naples by railway, on the shores of the bay, and at the foot of Vesuvius. ... Paddle steamers — Lucerne, Switzerland. ... Satellite view of the Peninsula in spring The Italian Peninsula or Apennine Peninsula (Italian: Penisola italiana or Penisola appenninica) is one of the greatest peninsulas of Europe, spanning 1,000 km from the Alps in the north to the central Mediterranean Sea in the south. ... Optical Telegraf of Claude Chappe on the Litermont near Nalbach, Germany Telegraphy (from the Greek words tele (τηλε) = far and graphein (γραφειν) = write) is the long-distance transmission of written messages without physical transport of letters, originally by changing something that could be observed from a distance (optical telegraphy). ... For other uses, see Palermo (disambiguation). ...


However, in 1837 he violently suppressed Sicilian demonstrators demanding a constitution and maintained strict police sureveillance in his domains. Progressive intellectuals, who were motivated by visions of a new society founded upon a modern constitution, continued to demand for the King to grant a constitution and to liberalize his rule. Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


Revolutions of 1848

In September 1847, violent riots inspired by Liberals broke out in Reggio Calabria and in Messina and were put down by the military. On January 12, 1848 a rising in Palermo, Sicily, spread throughout the island and served as a spark for the Revolutions of 1848 all over Europe. Location within Italy Map of Italy showing Reggio Calabria in the south Reggio Calabria (officially Reggio di Calabria, Rìggiu in calabrian dialect, Righi in Greek-Calabrian), is the largest and the oldest city in Calabria, Italy. ... Messina, Italy Strait of Messina, Italy. ... January 12 is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Sicilian revolution of independence of 1848 occurred in a year replete with revolutions and popular revolts. ... The European Revolutions of 1848, known in some countries as the Spring of Nations or the Year of Revolution, were a revolutionary wave which erupted in Sicily and then, further triggered by the revolutions of 1848 in France, soon spread to the rest of Europe and as far afield as... World map showing the location of Europe. ...


After similar revolutionary outbursts in Salerno, south of Naples, and in the Cilento region which were backed by the majority of the intelligentsia of the Kingdom, on January 29, 1848 King Ferdinand was forced to grant a constitution patterned on the Charter of 1830. Salerno is a town in Campania, south-western Italy, the capital of the province of the same name. ... “Napoli” redirects here. ... January 29 is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Charter of 1830 (French: ) instigated the July Monarchy in France. ...


A dispute, however, arose as to the nature of the oath which should be taken by the members of the chamber of deputies. As an agreement could not be reached and the King refused to compromise, riots continued in the streets. Eventually, the King ordered the army to break them and dissolved the national parliament on March 13, 1849. Although the constitution was never formally abrogated, the King returned to reigning as an absolute monarch. March 13 is the 72nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (73rd in leap years). ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


During this period, Ferdinand showed his attachment to Pope Pius IX by granting him assylum at Gaeta. The Holy Father had been temporarily forced to flee from Rome following similar revolutionary disturbances. (see Roman Republic (19th century), Giuseppe Mazzini. Pope Pius IX (May 13, 1792 – February 7, 1878), born Giovanni Maria Mastai-Ferretti, reigned as Pope of the Roman Catholic Church from his election in June 16, 1846, until his death more than 31 years later in 1878, making him the longest-reigning Pope since the Apostle St. ... Gaeta (ancient Latin name Caieta) is a city in Province of Latina, in Lazio, Italy. ... Military flag of the Roman Republic. ... Giuseppe Mazzini. ...


Meantime Sicily proclaimed its independence under the leadership of Ruggeru Sèttimu, who on April 13, 1848 declared the King deposed. In response, the King assembled an army of 20,000 under the command of General Carlo Filangieri and dispatched it to Sicily to subdue the Liberals and restore his authority. A naval flotilla sent to Sicilian waters shelled the city of Messina with "savage barbarity" for eight hours after its defenders had already surrendered, killing many civilians and earning the King the nickname "Re` Bomba" ("King Bomb"). Ruggeru Sèttimu Principi di Castelnuovo (Sicilian), Ruggero Settimo Prince of Castelnuovo in Italian (May 19, 1778, Palermo—May 12, 1863, in Malta) was a politician, diplomat, and patriotic activist of Sicily. ... April 13 is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Carlo Filangieri (1784 - October 9, 1867), prince of Satriano, Neapolitan soldier and statesman, was the son of Gaetano Filangieri, a celebrated philosopher and jurist. ... In politics, the term liberal refers to: an adherent of the ideology of liberalism or a state or quality of this ideology. ... Messina, Italy Strait of Messina, Italy. ...


After a campaign lasting close to nine months, Sicily's Liberal regime was completely subdued on May 15, 1849. May 15 is the 135th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (136th in leap years). ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


Later reign

Between 1848 and 1851, the policies of King Ferdinand caused many to go into exile. Meanwhile, an estimated 15,000 to 40,000 suspected revolutionaries or dissidents were jailed, most in appalling conditions.


In 1851, spurred by his friend Anthony Panizzi, future Prime Minister of the United Kingdom William Ewart Gladstone visited the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies to investigate the treatment of political prisoners. Unable to convince the Neapolitan authorities to take action, he reported the matter to the Prime Minister, George Hamilton-Gordon, 4th Earl of Aberdeen. Gladstone suggested that the British Government place diplomatic pressure upon the Kingdom. He indignantly dubbed the King's policies "the negation of God". Sir Antonio Genesio Maria Panizzi (17 September 1797 - 8 April 1879), better known as Anthony Panizzi, was a naturalized British librarian of Italian birth and an Italian patriot. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ... William Ewart Gladstone (29 December 1809 – 19 May 1898) was a British Liberal Party statesman and Prime Minister (1868–1874, 1880–1885, 1886 and 1892–1894). ... A prime minister is the most senior minister of a cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... The Right Honourable George Hamilton-Gordon, 4th Earl of Aberdeen, PC (January 28, 1784–December 14, 1860) was a Tory/Peelite politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1852 until 1855. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ...


The British Government, which had been the ally and protector of the Bourbon dynasty during the Napoleonic Wars, had additional reasons to put pressure on Ferdinand II. The British Government possessed extensive business interests in Sicily and relied on Sicilian sulfur for certain industries. The King had endevoured to limit British influence, which had been beginning to cause tension. As Ferdinand ignored the advice of the British and the French governments, those powers recalled their ambassadors in 1856. Combatants Allies: Austrian Empire[1] Kingdom of Portugal Kingdom of Prussia[1] Russian Empire[2] Kingdom of Spain[3] Kingdom of Sweden United Kingdom[4] Ottoman Empire[5] French Empire Kingdom of Holland Kingdom of Italy Kingdom of Naples Duchy of Warsaw Kingdom of Bavaria[6] Kingdom of Saxony[7... General Name, Symbol, Number sulfur, S, 16 Chemical series nonmetals Group, Period, Block 16, 3, p Appearance lemon yellow Standard atomic weight 32. ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


A soldier attempted to assassinate Ferdinand in 1856 and many believe that the infection he received from the soldier's bayonet led to his ultimate demise. He died on May 22, 1859, shortly after the Second French Empire and the Kingdom of Sardinia had declared war against the Austrian Empire. This would later lead to the invasion of his Kingdom by Giuseppe Garibaldi and Italian unification in 1861. May 22 is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... Kingdom of Sardinia, in 1839: Mainland Piedmont with Savoy, Nice, and Sardinia in the inset. ... Anthem: Volkshymne (Peoples Anthem) Capital Vienna Language(s) German Religion Roman Catholic Government Monarchy History  - Established 1804  - Disestablished 1867 Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy The Crown of the Austrian Emperor The Austrian Empire (German: ) was an empire centred on what is modern day Austria that officially lasted from 1804... Garibaldi in 1866. ... Italian unification (called in Italian the Risorgimento, or Resurgence) was the political and social process that unified disparate states of the Italian peninsula into the single nation of Italy. ... 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar) // January 1 - Benito Juárez captures Mexico City January 2 - Friedrich Wilhelm IV of Prussia dies and is succeeded by...


Marriages and children

King Ferdinand was married the first time on November 21, 1832 to Maria Christina of Savoy, daughter of King Victor Emmanuel I of Savoy. She died on January 21, 1836. Their only child, Francesco, succeeded his father as king. November 21 is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1832 (MDCCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Maria Christina (Carlotta Giuseppina Gaetana Elisa) of Savoy (14 November 1812, Cagliari - 21 January 1836, Caserta) was the first Queen consort of Ferdinand II of the Two Sicilies. ... Victor Emmanuel I (July 24, 1759–January 10, 1824) was the Duke of Savoy, Piedmont, and Aosta, and King of Sardinia from 1802 to 1821. ... January 21 is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Francis II (Francesco dAssisi Maria Leopoldo, January 16, 1836 – December 27, 1894), was King of the Two Sicilies from 1859 to 1861. ...


He was married the second time on January 9, 1837to Archduchess Maria Theresa of Austria, daughter of Archduke Charles of Austria, Duke of Teschen, son the Leopold II, and his protestant wife Henrietta of Nassau-Weilburg. They were the parents of twelve children together: January 9 is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Archduchess Maria Theresa (Isabella) of Austria (31 July 1816, Vienna - 8 August 1867, Albano) was the second Queen consort of Ferdinand II of the Two Sicilies. ... Archduke Charles of Austria, Duke of Teschen (de: Erzherzog Karl von Österreich, Herzog von Teschen, also known as Karl von Österreich-Teschen) (September 5, 1771–April 30, 1847) was a son of Leopold II, Holy Roman Emperor (1747–1792) and his wife Infanta Maria Luisa of Spain (1745–1792). ... Leopold II (born Peter Leopold Joseph) (May 5, 1747 – March 1, 1792) was the penultimate Holy Roman Emperor from 1790 to 1792 and Grand Duke of Tuscany. ... Henrietta (Alexandrine Frederika Wilhelmine) of Nassau-Weilburg (30 October 1797 Palace Ermitage, near Bayreuth - 29 December 1829, Vienna) was the wife of Archduke Charles, Duke of Teschen. ...

  • Lodovico, Count of Trani (1838-1886). Married Mathilde Ludovika, Duchess in Bavaria, sister of Empress Elisabeth of Austria. Their only daughter, Princess Maria Teresa of Bourbon-Two Sicilies, married Prince Wilhelm of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen.
  • Alberto, Count of Castrogiovanni (1839-1844).
  • Alfonso, Count of Caserta (1841-1934). Married his first cousin Princess Antonietta of the Two Sicilies and has issue. The current lines of Bourbon-Sicily descend from him.
  • Maria Annunziata of Bourbon-Two Sicilies (1843-1871). Married Archduke Karl Ludwig of Austria.
  • Maria Immacolata Clementina of Bourbon-Two Sicilies (1844-1899). Married Archduke Karl Salvator of Tuscany.
  • Prince Gaetano of Bourbon-Two Sicilies (1846-1871). In 1868, he married Isabel, Infanta of Spain (eldest daughter of Queen Isabella II of Spain) and was created Infante of Spain.
  • Giuseppe, Count of Lucera (1848-1851).
  • Maria Pia of Bourbon-Two Sicilies (1849-1882). Married Roberto I Duke of Parma and Piacenza.
  • Vincenzo, Count of Melazzo (1851-1854)
  • Pasquale, Count of Bari (1852-1904). Married morganatically to Blanche Marconnay.
  • Maria Immacolata Luisa of Bourbon-Two Sicilies (1855-1874). Married Enrico Prince of Bourbon-Parma, Count di Bardi.
  • Gennaro, Count of Caltagirone (1857-1867).
Preceded by
Francis I
King of the Two Sicilies
1830–1859
Succeeded by
Francis II

Lodovico, Count of Trani (1 August 1838, Naples - 8 June 1886, Paris) was the eldest son of Ferdinand II of the Two Sicilies and his second wife Archduchess Maria Theresa of Austria. ... Mathilde Ludovika, Duchess in Bavaria (30 September 1843, Possenhofen Castle - 18 June 1925, Munich) was the fourth daughter of Maximilian, Duke in Bavaria and Princess Ludovika of Bavaria. ... Elisabeth in a riding habit, from Vanity Fair, 1884. ... Princess Maria Teresa of Bourbon-Two Sicilies (15 January 1867, Zürich - 1 May 1909, Cannes) was the only child of Lodovico, Count of Trani and Mathilde Ludovika, Duchess in Bavaria. ... Prince Wilhelm of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen (7 March 1864, Schloss Benrath, near Düsseldorf - 22 October 1927, Sigmaringen) was the eldest son of Leopold, Prince of Hohenzollern and Infanta Antónia of Portugal. ... Prince or Infante Alfonso, Count of Caserta (28 March 1841-26 May 1934) was Duke of Calabria in succession of his brother, Francis II of the Two Sicilies. ... Karl Ludwig, Archduke of Austria (30 July 1833 - 19 May 1896) was the father of Franz Ferdinand of Austria, whose shooting occasioned the start of World War I. He was born at Schönbrunn in Vienna, the son of Franz Karl Josef of Austria (1802-1878) and his wife Sophie... Infanta doña Maria Isabel, Princess of Asturias (1851–1931), was twice the recognized first heir to the throne of Spain. ... Infanta doña Maria Isabel, Princess of Asturias (1851–1931), was twice the recognized first heir to the throne of Spain. ... Isabella II (October 10, 1830 – April 10, 1904), Isabel II in Spanish, was Queen regnant of Spain (Queen of the Spains officially from August 13, 1836, Isabella II the queen of Castile, Leon, Aragon,...) She was born in Madrid, and was the eldest daughter of Ferdinand VII, king of Spain... Robert I of Parma. ... Robert I Duke of Parma, Roberto I Carlo Luigi Maria Duke of Parma and Piacenza (July 9, 1848-November 16, 1907) was the son of Charles III of Parma and his wife Louise du Berry. ... The Duchy of Parma was a small Italian state between 1545 and 1802, and again from 1814 to 1860. ... Bardi can refer to: Bardi people, an Australian Aboriginal tribe. ... Francis I (Francesco Gennaro Giuseppe, August 14, 1777 – November 8, 1830) was King of the Two Sicilies from 1825 to 1830. ... The following is a list of monarchs of the Kingdom of Naples and Sicily: // Hauteville Counts of Sicily, 1071–1130 Roger I 1071–1101 Simon 1101–1105 Roger II 1105–1130 Hauteville Kings of Sicily, 1130–1198 Roger II 1130–1154 William I 1154–1166 William II 1166–1189 Tancred... Francis II (Francesco dAssisi Maria Leopoldo, January 16, 1836 – December 27, 1894), was King of the Two Sicilies from 1859 to 1861. ...

See also

  • Napoli-Portici

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ferdinand II (of Two Sicilies) - Search Results - MSN Encarta (0 words)
Ferdinand II (of Two Sicilies), known as King Bomba (1810-1859), king of the Two Sicilies (1830-1859), son of King Francis I, whom he succeeded.
Francis I (of Two Sicilies) (1777-1830), king of the Two Sicilies (1825-30), the son of King Ferdinand I. Francis was viceroy of Sicily from 1812...
The son and heir of Ferdinand II of the Two Sicilies and Maria Christina of Savoy, Francis II was the last of the Bourbon kings of Naples, where he was born in 1836.
Ferdinand (241 words)
Ferdinand IV, Archduke of Austria, duke of Modena.
Ferdinand II of the Two Sicilies - 1810-1859; became king 1830.
Ferdinand of Austria, Cardinal-Infante of Spain[?] - 1618-1641
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