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Encyclopedia > Feral child

A feral child (feral, - wild or undomesticated) is a human child who has lived isolated from human contact from a very young age, and has no (or little) experience of human care, loving or social behavior, and, crucially, of human language. Feral children were confined by humans (often parents), brought up by animals, or lived in the wild in isolation. Just over a hundred incidences have been reported in English.[1] though more incidences may have been unreported. These cases are considered interesting from a psychological and a sociological perspective. When completely brought up by animals the feral child exhibits behaviors (within physical limits) almost entirely like those of the particular care-animal, including its variety of instincts, fear of or indifference to humans, etc. Wild child can refer to: A feral child Alexi Wildchild Laiho Roger Wildchild McKenzie Wildchild (rapper), from Lootpack Danny the Wildchild DJ Wildchild Wildchild (comics), from Marvel Comics Wild Child, a song on Enyas A Day Without Rain Wild Child, a song by Heart[1] Wild Child, a song... A feral horse (an American mustang) in Wyoming A feral animal or plant is one that has escaped from domestication and returned, partly or wholly, to its wild state. ... Dogs and sheep were among the first animals to be domesticated. ... For other uses, see Child (disambiguation). ... Isolation can refer to: Isolation as a psychological phenomenon. ... For other uses, see Society (disambiguation). ... Psychology (ancient Greek: psyche = soul and logos = word) is the study of mind, thought, and behaviour. ... Sociology is the study of the social lives of humans, groups and societies. ...


Children with some human experience before isolation are more easily rehabilitated after discovery. Children who learn an alternative, animal culture, especially during the first 5 or 6 years of life, find it almost impossible to learn human language, to walk or engage meaningfully with other humans - even after intensive and loving care for years - see Amala and Kamala - which demonstrates what many child developmental experts and psychologists have been arguing: that early years in child development are absolutely crucial. Amala (died 21 September 1921) and Kamala (died 14 November 1929) are the names of two feral children, who were found 9 October 1920 in the West Bengal district of Midnapore in India by The Reverend and rector of the local orphanage Joseph Amrito Lal Singh. ...

Contents

Origins and effects

Feral children are those who have been separated from society by being lost or abandoned in the wild. The category also includes children who have been purposely kept apart from human society, e.g. kept in a room in solitary confinement. Sometimes abandonment is due to the parents' rejection of a child's severe intellectual or physical impairment, and feral children may experience severe child abuse or trauma before being abandoned or running away. Child abandonment is the practice of abandoning offspring outside of legal adoption. ... Solitary confinement, colloquially referred to as the hole (or in British English the block), is a punishment in which a prisoner is denied contact with any other persons, excluding guards, chaplains and doctors. ... Child abuse is the physical, sexual, or emotional maltreatment or neglect of children by parents, guardians, or others. ...


Myths, legends, and fictional stories have depicted feral children reared by wild animals such as wolves and bears. Famous examples include Edgar Rice Burroughs's Tarzan, Rudyard Kipling's Mowgli, and the legend of Romulus and Remus. For other uses, see Fiction (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ... Wolf Wolf Man Mount Wolf Wolf Prizes Wolf Spider Wolf 424 Wolf 359 Wolf Point Wolf-herring Frank Wolf Friedrich Wolf Friedrich August Wolf Hugo Wolf Johannes Wolf Julius Wolf Max Franz Joseph Cornelius Wolf Maximilian Wolf Rudolf Wolf Thomas Wolf As Name Wolf Breidenbach Wolf Hirshorn Other The call... For other uses, see Bear (disambiguation). ... Edgar Rice Burroughs Edgar Rice Burroughs (September 1, 1875 – March 19, 1950) was an American author, best known for his creation of the jungle hero Tarzan, although he also produced works in many genres. ... For other uses, see Tarzan (disambiguation). ... This article is about the British author. ... Mowgli by John Lockwood Kipling (father of Rudyard Kipling). ... This page describes the ancient heroes who founded the city of Rome. ...


Legendary and fictional feral children are often depicted as growing up with relatively normal human intelligence and skills and an innate sense of culture or civilization, coupled with a healthy dose of survival instincts; their integration into human society is made to seem relatively easy. In reality, feral children lack the basic social skills which are normally learned in the process of enculturation. For example, they may be unable to learn to use a toilet, have trouble learning to walk upright and display a complete lack of interest in the human activity around them. They often seem mentally impaired and have almost insurmountable trouble learning a human language. The subject is treated with a certain amount of realism in François Truffaut's 1970 film L'Enfant Sauvage (UK: The Wild Boy, US: The Wild Child), where a scientist's efforts in trying to rehabilitate a feral boy meet with great difficulty. Cover from Shasta of the Wolves by Olaf Baker (1921 British edition) Feral children (that is, human children raised by non-human animals) in mythology and fiction are often depicted as having superior strength, intelligence and morals to normal humans, the implication being that because of their upbringing they represent... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Language Acquisition: A Journal of Developmental Linguistics Language acquisition is the process by which the language capability develops in a human. ... François Roland Truffaut (French IPA: ) (February 6, 1932 – October 21, 1984) was one of the founders of the French New Wave in filmmaking, and remains an icon of the French film industry. ... The Wild Child (title of the film in the United States; it was released in the United Kingdom as The Wild Boy; originally released in France as LEnfant sauvage) was a film by the French director François Truffaut, which was released in 1970. ... The Wild Child (title of the film in the United States; it was released in the United Kingdom as The Wild Boy; originally released in France as LEnfant sauvage) was a film by the French director François Truffaut, which was released in 1970. ...


Feral children in mythology and fiction are often depicted as having superior strength, intelligence and morals compared to "normal" humans, the implication being that because of their upbringing they represent humanity in a pure and uncorrupted state.


It is essentially impossible to convert a child who became isolated at a very young age into a relatively normal member of society and such individuals need close care throughout their lives. When they are "discovered", feral children tend to become the subject of lively scientific and media interest. Once the excitement dies down and their limitations in terms of learning culture and social behaviour become obvious, frustration can set in and they often spend the rest of their lives being passed from one caregiver to another. It is common for them to die young, though their potential lifespan if they had been left in the wild is difficult to know.


There is little scientific knowledge about feral children. One very useful source is the detailed diaries of Reverend Singh who, in 1920, discovered Amala and Kamala in a forest in India, two girls who appeared to have been brought up from birth by wolves. They were taken to an orphanage and the struggle to 'humanise the animals' began. Amala, who was one and a half years old when found, died a year later of a kidney infection, and Kamala, who was eight, survived until 1929 before dying of typhoid fever- only in her latter years beginning to speak a few words, stand up, and relate to other humans. Amala (died 21 September 1921) and Kamala (died 14 November 1929) are the names of two feral children, who were found 9 October 1920 in the West Bengal district of Midnapore in India by The Reverend and rector of the local orphanage Joseph Amrito Lal Singh. ...


Other sources[2] claim that Amala and Kamala were born mentally and physically disabled. The parents who did not wish to not care for them, or lacked the resources to do so, left the two girls in the forest where Reverend Singh discovered them while hunting. Even after claiming them as his own, he still sent them to the orphanage to act as wolves for locals in order to raise money for the orphanage in its financial need.


Ancient reports

Herodotus, the historian, wrote that Egyptian pharaoh Psammetichus I (Psamtik) sought to discover the origin of language by conducting an experiment with two children. Allegedly, he gave two newborn babies to a shepherd, with the instructions that no one should speak to them, but that the shepherd should feed and care for them while listening to determine their first words. The hypothesis was that the first word would be uttered in the root language of all people. When one of the children cried "becos" (a sound quite similar to the bleating of sheep) with outstretched arms the shepherd concluded that the word was Phrygian because that was the sound of Phrygian word for bread. Thus, they concluded that the Phrygians were an older people than the Egyptians. The veracity of this story is impossible to determine. Herodotus of Halicarnassus (Greek: Hērodotos Halikarnāsseus) was a Greek historian from Ionia who lived in the 5th century BC (ca. ... For other uses, see Pharaoh (disambiguation). ... Wahibre Nomen Psamtik Horus name Aaib Nebty name Neba Golden Horus Qenu Issues Nitocris I Died 610 BC Burial Sais Psammetichus, or Psamtik I, was the first of three kings of the Saite, or Twenty-sixth dynasty of Egypt. ... The origin of language (glottogony) is a topic that has attracted considerable speculation throughout human history. ... The Phrygian language was the Indo-European language of the Phrygians, a people who probably migrated from Thrace to Asia Minor in the Bronze Age. ...

Legend has it that Romulus and Remus, twin sons of Rhea Silvia and Mars, were raised by wolves. Rhea Silvia was a Vestal Virgin, and when it was found that she had been pregnant and had had children, the local King Amulius ordered her to be buried alive and for the children to be killed. The servant who was given the order set them in a basket on the Tiber river instead and the children were taken by Tiberinus, the river god, to the shore where a she-wolf found them and raised them until they were discovered as toddlers by a shepherd named Faustulus. He and his wife Acca Larentia, who had always wanted a child but never had one, raised the twins, who would later figure prominently in the events leading up to the founding of Rome (named after Romulus, who eventually kills Remus to have the city founded on the Palatine Hill rather than the Aventine Hill). Image File history File links She-wolf_suckles_Romulus_and_Remus. ... Image File history File links She-wolf_suckles_Romulus_and_Remus. ... Capitoline Wolf (Italian: Lupa Capitolina) is a 5th century BC Etruscan bronze statue, cast in the lower Tiber valley,[1] located since Antiquity in Rome. ... This page describes the ancient heroes who founded the city of Rome. ... This page describes the ancient heroes who founded the city of Rome. ... Rhea Silvia (also written as Rea Silvia), and also known as Ilia, was the mythical mother of the twins Romulus and Remus, who founded the city of Rome. ... Mars was the Roman god of war, the son of Juno and either Jupiter or a magical flower. ... Wolf Wolf Man Mount Wolf Wolf Prizes Wolf Spider Wolf 424 Wolf 359 Wolf Point Wolf-herring Frank Wolf Friedrich Wolf Friedrich August Wolf Hugo Wolf Johannes Wolf Julius Wolf Max Franz Joseph Cornelius Wolf Maximilian Wolf Rudolf Wolf Thomas Wolf As Name Wolf Breidenbach Wolf Hirshorn Other The call... Image of a Roman Vestal Virgin In Ancient Rome, the Vestal Virgins (sacerdos Vestalis), were the virgin holy priestesses of Vesta, the goddess of the hearth. ... In Roman mythology, Amulius was the brother of Numitor and son of Procas. ... Tiber River in Rome The River Tiber (Italian Tevere), the third longest river in Italy (disputed — see talk page) at 406 km (252 miles) after the Po and the Adige, flows through the Campagna and Rome in its course from Mount Fumaiolo to the Tyrrhenian Sea, which it reaches... Tiberinus is a figure in Roman mythology. ... In Roman mythology, Acca Larentia was Hercules mistress after he won her in a game of dice (Macrobius i. ... 17th century aviaries on the hill, built by Rainaldi for Odoardo Cardinal Farnese: once wirework cages surmounted them. ... The Aventine Hill is one of the seven hills on which ancient Rome was built. ...


Documented cases

Of the approximately 100 cases often cited, few have been confirmed or well studied, many lack detail, and many may have been exaggerated and embellished. Here is a limited list: Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... Image File history File links Kaspar_hauser. ... Image File history File links Kaspar_hauser. ... Kaspar Hauser Kaspar Hauser or Casparus Hauser (April 30, 1812–December 17, 1833) was a mysterious foundling in 19th century Germany with suspected ties to the royal house of Baden. ...

  • Joseph Amrito Lal Singh, Robert M. Zingg (1966). Wolf-Children and Feral Man. Wolf-Children and Feral Man. Shoe String Pr Inc. Retrieved on October 18, 2005.
  • Hessian wolf-children (1341-1344).[citation needed]
  • The Bamberg boy, who grew up among cattle (late 1500s).
  • Hans of Liege[citation needed]; the Irish boy brought up by sheep, reported by Nicolaes Tulp in his book Observationes Medicae (1672).[3]
  • The three Lithuanian bear-boys (1657, 1669, 1694).[citation needed]
  • The girl of Oranienburg (1717).[citation needed]
  • The two Pyrenean boys (1719).[citation needed]
  • Peter the Wild Boy of Hamelin (1724).
  • The Wild Girl of Champagne (1731).
  • The Hungarian bear-girl (1767).[citation needed]
  • The wild man of Kronstadt (ca 1780).[4]
  • Victor of Aveyron (1797), portrayed in the 1969 movie by François Truffaut The Wild Child (L'Enfant sauvage).
  • Kaspar Hauser (early 1800s), portrayed in the 1974 film by Werner Herzog The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser (Jeder für sich und Gott gegen alle).[5]
  • Amala and Kamala, girls raised by wolves, found in 1920 near Midnapore, Calcutta region, India.[6]
  • Ramu, Lucknow, India, (1954), snatched by a wolf as a baby, raised until the age of 7.[7]
  • Syrian Gazelle-boy A boy aged around 10 was found in the midst of a herd of gazelles in the Syrian desert in the 1950's, and was only caught with the help of an Iraqi army jeep, because he could run at speeds of up to 50 km/h.[8]
  • Saharan Gazelle Boy (1960), gazelle boy of Rio de Oro (the Spanish Sahara), written about by Jean-Claude Armen.[9]
  • Genie, Los Angeles, California, discovered 1970.[10]
  • Robert (1982) Robert lost his parents in the Ugandan civil war at the age of three, when Obote's looting and murdering soldiers raided their village, around 50 miles (80 km) from Kampala. Robert then lived in the wild, presumably with Vervet monkeys, for three years until he was found by soldiers.[11]
  • James Goodfellow (1983) - was found in Brazil, had been raised by wild wolves. He proceeded to be the alpha male within the pack. He ran on all fours and howled in the night. He was seen cleaning himself with his tongue and hands, very common among feral children.[citation needed]
  • Baby Hospital (1984) This 7-year-old girl found by an Italian missionary in Sierra Leone. She was seemingly brought up by apes or monkeys. Baby Hospital was unable to stand upright and crawled instead of walking, and ate directly from her bowl without using her hands. She made the chattering noises of apes or monkeys. Baby Hospital's arms and hands were reported to be well developed, but not her leg muscles. She resisted attempts to civilise her, instead spending much of her time in an activity that is very unusual for feral children: crying.[12]
  • Saturday Mthiyane (Saturday Mifune) (1987) a boy of around 5 in the company of monkeys over a period of a year, in the Kwazulu-Natal province of South Africa.[13]
  • Oxana Malaya, Ukraine, (1990s) raised with dogs until the age of 9.[14]
  • Daniel, Andes Goat Boy (1990) found in Peru, and was said to have been raised by goats for eight years.[15]
  • John Ssebunya, Uganda, (1991) raised by monkeys for several years in the Ugandan jungle.[16][17]
  • Belo, the Nigerian Chimp Boy (1996) about 2 years of age, raised by chimpanzees for 1 1/2 years.[18]
  • Ivan Mishukov (1998) found near Moscow, raised by dogs for two years, and had risen to being "alpha male" of the pack.[19]
  • Edik, Ukraine, (1999) Edik was found by social workers apparently living with stray dogs in an apartment.[20]
  • Alex the Dog Boy (2001) found in Talcahuano, Chile.[21]
  • Traian Căldărar, Romania, (2002) lived 3 years of his childhood with wild dogs in the Romanian wilderness.[22]
  • Andrei Tolstyk (2004) of Bespalovskoya, near Lake Baikal, Russia, abandoned by parents, to be raised by a guard dog.[23]
  • Viktoria, Katharina and Elisabeth in Linz, Austria (discovered October 2006). Aged 14, 18 and 21. Mother kept them in a dark cellar for 7 years. The girls played with mice and developed their own language.[24]
  • Rochom P'ngieng, Cambodia, (2007) lived 19 years in the Cambodian jungle.[25]
  • Name Unknown, Uzbekistan, (2007) found after eight years.[26]
  • Amy G, Bulgaria (2007). Amy G was found in a mountain area in Bulgaria called Bansko where she had been raised by stray dogs. She was unable to communicate and appears to have lived on wild berries and rats.[citation needed]

is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The term Hessian refers to the inhabitants of the German state of Hesse. ... Species See text. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Oranienburg is a town in Brandenburg, Germany. ... Pic de Bugatetin the Néouvielle Natural Reserve Central Pyrenees For the mountains in Victoria, Australia, see Pyrenees (Victoria). ... Peter the Wild Boy (fl. ... Hamelin (German: Hameln) is a town in Lower Saxony, Germany. ... County BraÅŸov County Status County capital Mayor George Scripcaru, Democratic Party, since 2004 Area 267. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... François Roland Truffaut (French IPA: ) (February 6, 1932 – October 21, 1984) was one of the founders of the French New Wave in filmmaking, and remains an icon of the French film industry. ... The Wild Child (title of the film in the United States; it was released in the United Kingdom as The Wild Boy; originally released in France as LEnfant sauvage) was a film by the French director François Truffaut, which was released in 1970. ... Kaspar Hauser Kaspar Hauser or Casparus Hauser (April 30, 1812–December 17, 1833) was a mysterious foundling in 19th century Germany with suspected ties to the royal house of Baden. ... Werner Herzog (born Werner Stipetić on September 5, 1942) is a critically and internationally acclaimed German film director, screenwriter, actor, and opera director. ... DVD cover for The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser (original title : Jeder für sich und Gott gegen alle - Every man for himself and God against all) is a 1974 German film written and directed by Werner Herzog revisiting the legend of Kaspar Hauser. ... Amala (died 21 September 1921) and Kamala (died 14 November 1929) are the names of two feral children, who were found 9 October 1920 in the West Bengal district of Midnapore in India by The Reverend and rector of the local orphanage Joseph Amrito Lal Singh. ... For other uses, see Midnapore (disambiguation). ... This article is on Calcutta/Kolkata, the city. ... , Lucknow ( , Hindi: लखनऊ, Urdu: لکھنؤ, ) is the capital city of Uttar Pradesh, the most populous state of India. ... Susan M. Wiley. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Oxana Malaya (Оксана Малая) (born 1983) was found as an 8-year-old feral child in Ukraine in the early 1990s, having lived most of her life in the company of dogs. ... Alpha male redirects here. ... Talcahuano is a port city of Chile, lying near Concepción. ... Wikinews has news related to: Cambodian woman found after 19 years of jungle life Rochom Pngieng (allegedly born 1979) is a young Cambodian Pnong woman who allegedly lived as a feral child for eighteen or nineteen years. ...

See also

Hypothetical and actual experiments which involve isolating individuals - usually young children - from the normal use of language have been recurrent throughout history as a purported means of discovering the fundamental character of human nature or the origins of language. ... Psychogenic dwarfism, Psychosocial dwarfism or Stress dwarfism is a growth disorder that is observed between the ages of 2 and 15, caused by extreme emotional deprivation or stress. ... A street child or street kid is a child who lives on the street – in particular, one that is not taken care of by parents or other adults – and who sleeps on the street because he or she does not have a home. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ feralchildren.com lists 117 known cases here.
  2. ^ Bruno Bettelheim. "Feral Children and Autistic Children," The American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 64, No. 5. (Mar., 1959), pp. 455-467.
  3. ^ Andrew Ward. The Irish Sheep Boy. feralchildren.com. Retrieved on 14 July 2007.
  4. ^ Deal, Bama Lutes (2005-04-01). Chapter 2: Feral Children and Wranitzky’s Pantomime-Ballet Das Waldmädchen (1796) (PDF). The Origin and Performance History of Carl Maria von Weber's Das Waldmädchen (1800) page 16. Florida State University. Retrieved on 2007-06-18.
  5. ^ Brian Haughton. The Unsolved Mystery of Kaspar Hauser - Wild Child of Europe. Mysterious People. Retrieved on 14 July 2007.
  6. ^ Andrew Ward. Kamala and Amala, the Wolf Girls of Midnapore. feralchildren.com. Retrieved on 14 July 2007.
  7. ^ Naked man deepens mystery of jungle girl. The Sydney Morning Herald (22 January 2007). Retrieved on 14 July 2007.
  8. ^ Andrew Ward. The Syrian Gazelle Boy. feralchildren.com. Retrieved on 14 July 2007.
  9. ^ Andrew Ward. The Saharan Gazelle Boy. feralchildren.com. Retrieved on 14 July 2007.
  10. ^ Andrew Ward. Genie, a modern-day Wild Child. feralchildren.com. Retrieved on 14 July 2007.
  11. ^ Andrew Ward. Robert, a monkey boy from Uganda. feralchildren.com. Retrieved on 14 July 2007.
  12. ^ Andrew Ward. Baby Hospital, the Monkey Girl from Sierra Leone. feralchildren.com. Retrieved on 14 July 2007.
  13. ^ Andrew Ward. Saturday Mthiyane (Saturday Mifune). feralchildren.com. Retrieved on 14 July 2007.
  14. ^ Cry of an infant savage. Daily Telegraph (17 July 2006). Retrieved on 14 July 2007.
  15. ^ Andrew Ward. Daniel, Andes Goat Boy. feralchildren.com. Retrieved on 14 July 2007.
  16. ^ Andrew Ward. John Ssebunya, the Ugandan Monkey Boy. feralchildren.com. Retrieved on 14 July 2007.
  17. ^ From monkey boy to choir boy. BBC News (6 October 1999). Retrieved on 14 July 2007.
  18. ^ Andrew Ward. Bello, the Nigerian Chimp Boy. feralchildren.com. Retrieved on 14 July 2007.
  19. ^ Andrew Ward. Ivan Mishukov, the Russian Dog Boy. feralchildren.com. Retrieved on 14 July 2007.
  20. ^ Edik, the Ukrainian Dog Boy. feralchildren.com. Retrieved on 31 July 2007.
  21. ^ Jan McGirk (20 June 2001). Modern-day Mowgli found scavenging with pack of wild dogs. The Independent. Retrieved on 14 July 2007.
  22. ^ Wolf boy is welcomed home by mother after years in the wild. Daily Telegraph (14 April 2002). Retrieved on 14 July 2007.
  23. ^ Andrew Osborn (4 August 2004). Abandoned boy said to have been raised by a dog. New Zealand Herald. Retrieved on 14 July 2007.
  24. ^ Unfassbares Familiendrama in Linz: Mutter hat ihre drei Töchter jahrelang eingesperrt! (German). News Networld. Retrieved on 14 July 2007.
  25. ^ 'Wild Cambodia jungle-girl' found. BBC News (19 January 2007). Retrieved on 14 July 2007.
  26. ^ Boy found in Uzbekistan after eight years of animal existence. Russian News & Information Agency (1 March 2007). Retrieved on 14 July 2007.

Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Florida State University (commonly referred to as Florida State or FSU)[7] is a public research university located in Tallahassee. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Lost girl recognised by father after 19 years living wild in the jungle
  • Children rescued & raised by dogs
  • "NOVA Online Transcripts 'Secret of the Wild Child'"
  • FeralChildren.com, a comprehensive feral children website
  • Feral Children at the Open Directory Project
  • Chilean boy found raised by dogs, 2001
  • Collection of articles on feral children
  • Cry of an enfant sauvage article about Oxana Malaya

The Open Directory Project (ODP), also known as dmoz (from , its original domain name), is a multilingual open content directory of World Wide Web links owned by Netscape that is constructed and maintained by a community of volunteer editors. ...

Bibliography

  • Kenneth B. Kidd (2004).Elijah Worrell Making American Boys: Boyology and the Feral Tale. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. ISBN 0-8166-4295-8.
  • Michael Newton (2002). Savage Boys and Wild Girls: A History of Feral Children. London: Faber and Faber. ISBN 0-571-21460-6.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Feral child Information (739 words)
Feral children may be separated from society by being lost or abandoned in the wild.
Legendary and fictional feral children are often depicted as growing up with relatively normal human intelligence and skills and an innate sense of culture or civilization, coupled with a healthy dose of survival instincts; their integration into human society is made to seem relatively easy.
In reality, however, feral children lack the basic social skills which are normally learned in the process of enculturation.
Feral child - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (762 words)
Feral children may be separated from society by being lost or abandoned in the wild.
Legendary and fictional feral children are often depicted as growing up with relatively normal human intelligence and skills and an innate sense of culture or civilization, coupled with a healthy dose of survival instincts; their integration into human society is made to seem relatively easy.
In reality, however, feral children lack the basic social skills which are normally learned in the process of enculturation.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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