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Encyclopedia > Fenny Stratford

Fenny Stratford is a town that is now part of Milton Keynes, ceremonial Buckinghamshire, England and in the Civil Parish of Bletchley and Fenny Stratford. It was included in the designated Milton Keynes "new city" area in 1967. From 1895 it to 1974 it formed an urban district with Bletchley, when it became part of the borough of Milton Keynes (since 1997 a unitary authority). It is located at the south east edge of the city and is its gateway to northbound travellers on the A5. Ronda, Spain Main street in Bastrop, Texas, a small town A town is a community of people ranging from a few hundred to several thousands, although it may be applied loosely even to huge metropolitan areas. ... , Milton Keynes is a large town in northern Buckinghamshire, in South East England, about 45 miles (75 km) north-west of London, and roughly halfway between London and Birmingham. ... Buckinghamshire (abbreviated Bucks) is one of the home counties in South East England. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Monarch Queen Elizabeth II... A civil parish (usually just parish) in England is a subnational entity forming the lowest unit of local government, lower than districts or counties. ... Bletchley and Fenny Stratford is a civil parish with a town council, in Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire, England. ... Below is a list of some of the new towns in the United Kingdom created under the various New Town Acts of the 20th century. ... In the British Isles an urban district was a type of local government district which covered an urbanised area. ... Bletchley is a town in what is now Milton Keynes new city. ... Milton Keynes is a borough in England. ... The A5 is a major road in the United Kingdom. ...

Map sources for Fenny Stratford at grid reference SP880340

Contents

Image File history File links Dot4gb. ... Image File history File links Gb4dot. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ...

History

The town name is an Old English language word that means 'marshy ford on a Roman road'. The Roman road in this case is the Watling Street. There are traces of the Roman settlement Magiovinium on the edge of the present day occupation. (Possibly the oldest known gold coin in Britain was found here, a gold stater of the mid-second century BCE).[1] The town was recorded in manorial rolls in 1252 as Fenni Stratford, though previously it was just known as Stratford: the prefix being added to distinguish the town from nearby Stony Stratford. Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon[1], Old English: ) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ... A ford is a section of water (most commonly a section of a river) that is sufficiently shallow as to be traversable by wading. ... For the one-off TV Drama, see Roman Road (TV Drama) A Roman road in Pompeii. ... The modern Watling Street crossing the Medway at Rochester near the Roman and Celt crossings Watling Street is the name given to an ancient trackway in England and Wales that was first used by the Celts mainly between the modern cities of Canterbury and St Albans. ... The stater was an ancient coin of Greek or Lydian origin which circulated from about 500 BC to 50 AD. It was also heavily used by Celtic tribes. ... Generic plan of a mediaeval manor; open-field strip farming, some enclosures, triennial crop rotation, demesne and manse, common woodland, pasturage and meadow Manorialism or Seigneurialism is the organization of rural economy and society in medieval western and parts of central Europe, characterised by the vesting of legal and economic... For broader historical context, see 1250s and 13th century. ... Location within the British Isles. ...


Being an ancient market town, Fenny Stratford was the location of a weekly market for many years until 1665 when the town was badly hit by the bubonic plague. As a result the main road that ran through the town was diverted away from it, and the market died as a result. The market was never reinstigated: the town was very much in ruins by the early Eighteenth century, and had by this time joined with both Bletchley and Simpson, being commonly considered a hamlet of the former. The market town is a medieval phenomenon. ... Year 1665 (MDCLXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... The bubonic plague or bubonic fever is the best-known variant of the deadly infectious disease caused by the enterobacteria Yersinia pestis. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Simpson is a village in the Unitary District of Milton Keynes. ... A hamlet is (usually — see below) a small settlement, too small or unimportant to be considered a village. ...


Parish church

St Martin's Church

On St Martin's Day 1724 the first stone was laid of the new parish church of Fenny Stratford, marking a fresh start in the town's history. Browne Willis, a historian of the day, had raised the funds for the reconstruction. The Church was built on the site of the old Chantry Chapel of St. Margaret and St. Catherine at Fenny Stratford. He erected the church as a memorial to his grandfather Dr. Thomas Willis, a famous physician, who lived in St. Martin's Lane in the parish of St. Martin-in-the-Fields in London, who died on St. Martin's day, 11th November 1675.In order to perpetuate his own memory, Browne Willis arranged for a sermon to be preached at St. Martin's Church on each St. Martin's Day, for which a fee was payable. During his lifetime, he also celebrated the occasion with a dinner attended by local clergy and gentry,an event which has continued to the present day. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1536 pixel, file size: 830 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1536 pixel, file size: 830 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... November 11 is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 50 days remaining. ... Events January 14 - King Philip V of Spain abdicates the throne February 20 - The premiere of Giulio Cesare, an Italian opera by George Frideric Handel, takes place in London June 23 - Treaty of Constantinople signed. ... A parish is a type of administrative subdivision. ... Browne Willis (1682 - 1760), antiquary, educated at Westminster and Oxford, entered the Inner Temple 1700, sat in the House of Commons 1705-8. ...


The Fenny Poppers

The fenny poppers are six small ceremonial canon which date from this time and are still fired ceremonially (with blank charges) today.


There is no record of their first use. In 1740, Browne Willis bought a house in Aylesbury Street, Fenny Stratford and the rent from this was used to pay for the sermon and gunpowder. Following his death in 1760, the traditions were carried on and later documented.


All six poppers were re-cast by the Eagle Foundry, Northampton in 1859, after one of them burst. It is these that are still in use today and they were recently examined and x-rayed to ensure there are no cracks. During their long history, many sites have been used for this battery. These include; the Canal Wharf, land behind the Church, St, Martin's Hall, the Churchyard and now the Leon Recreation Ground that was once part of the lands belonging to the Chantry.


The poppers each weigh about 19 pounds (8.5 kg). The bore, 6" by 1¾" (152 mm x 44 mm) will take one ounce (28g) of gunpowder, which is plugged with well-rammed newspaper. They are fired three times on St. Martin's Day (11 November); noon, 2:00pm and 4:00pm precisely. There is of course no connection with Remembrance Day (also 11 November). In 1901 they were fired to mourn the death of Queen Victoria, the 81 salutes were heard as far as Olney. On the 1 January, 2000, at 11.00am the Poppers were fired to mark the beginning of the Second Millennium. At 2.00pm on the 4 August, 2000, a salute of Six Poppers was fired to celebrate the 100th Birthday of the Queen's Mother. Smokeless powder Gunpowder is a pyrotechnic composition, an explosive mixture that burns rapidly, producing volumes of hot gas which can be used as a propellant in firearms and fireworks. ... St. ... Wreaths of artificial poppies used as a symbol of remembrance Remembrance Day (United Kingdom, Australia, Canada), also known as Poppy Day (South Africa and Malta), and Armistice Day (United States, New Zealand, France, and many other Commonwealth countries; and the original name of the day internationally) is a day to... Victoria Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria) (24 May 1819–22 January 1901) was a Queen of the United Kingdom, reigning from 20 June 1837 until her death. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Invention of the Diesel Engine in Fenny Stratford

The world's first successful heavy oil engines were invented and built by Herbert Akroyd Stuart in Fenny Stratford[2]. There is a plaque commemorating this at the westerly end of Denmark Street in Fenny Stratford opposite The Foundary public house - though the location of Akroyd Stuart's workshop is usually given as "Bletchley", which is a larger town adjoining Fenny Stratford. These engines were precursors to what we know as the Diesel engine: Rudolf Diesel based his designs (1892) on Akroyd-Stuart's proven inventions (1890) of direct (airless) fuel injection and compression ignition. An experimental model was tried out at the offices of the Fenny Stratford Times Newspaper, and the first production models were installed at Fenny's Great Brickhill Waterworks where they were in operation from 1892 to 1923. (It has been argued that engines of this type might have become known as "Akroyds"[3]; however, Diesel was a rather paranoid person, and not prone to giving other inventors credit[4].) 1939 Lanz Bulldog tractor with hot bulb engine. ... Herbert Akroyd-Stuart (January 28, 1864, Halifax Yorkshire, England - February 19, 1927) Inventor of the hot bulb oil engine. ... Bletchley is the name of more than one place. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about Rudolf Diesel, the German inventor. ... 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar). ... For other senses of this word, see paranoia (disambiguation). ...


Today

Aylesbury Street

Fenny Stratford is a busy small town at the edge of the Milton Keynes urban area. It still doesn't have a market, but the small shopping street gives the town a real community feel. It has its own railway station on the Marston Vale Line, one of the five that serve Milton Keynes. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1536 pixel, file size: 703 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1536 pixel, file size: 703 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Fenny Stratford railway station is a railway station that serves the Fenny Stratford area of Milton Keynes. ... The Marston Vale Line is the railway line from Bletchley to Bedford. ...


The Grand Union Canal runs through the southern outskirts of the town and Fenny Lock is located a few tens of yards to the East of Watling Street. It is notable both for the manually-operated swing bridge which crosses the lock and for the very small rise of in the lock (around 30cm or 12 inches). This was deemed necessary by the canal engineers in order to avoid the necessity to build an expensive embankment off to the East. The level persists from this lock for eleven miles, through what is now Milton Keynes and the older town of Wolverton, to the next lock at Cosgrove.


Reference

  1. ^ Object 2234: "Gold stater ('Gallo-Belgic A' type) Roman, mid-2nd century BC Probably made in northern France or Belgium; found at Fenny Stratford near Milton Keynes, England".. British Museum. Retrieved on 2007-04-11.
  2. ^ "The Emergence of the Oil Engine". Anson Engine Musuem. Retrieved on 2007-07-25.
  3. ^ "A Glossary of Diesel Terms". Paxman History Pages. Retrieved on 2007-07-25.
  4. ^ "No. 1435: Rudolf Diesel". Engines of Our Ingenuity. Retrieved on 2007-07-25.

Coordinates: 51°59′55″N, 0°42′58″W Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Fenny Stratford - definition of Fenny Stratford in Encyclopedia (333 words)
Fenny Stratford is a town in the Unitary Authority of Milton Keynes, in England.
The town was recorded in manorial rolls in 1252 as Fenni Stratford, though previously it was just known as Stratford: the prefix being added to distinguish the town from nearby Stony Stratford.
Being an ancient market town, Fenny Stratford was the location of a weekly market for many years until 1665 when the town was badly hit by the bubonic plague.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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