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Encyclopedia > Fennel
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Fennel
Fennel in flower
Fennel in flower
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Apiales
Family: Apiaceae
Genus: Foeniculum
Species: F. vulgare
Foeniculum vulgare
Mill.
For Giant fennel (Ferula communis) see Ferula.

Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) is a species in the genus Foeniculum (treated as the sole species by many botanists), and is native to southern Europe (especially the Mediterranean) and southwestern Asia. It is a member of the family Apiaceae (formerly the Umbelliferae). Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1280x960, 609 KB) Name Foeniculum vulgare Familiy Apiaceae Taken by Carsten Niehaus (user:Lumbar). ... Scientific classification or biological classification is how biologists group and categorize extinct and living species of organisms (as opposed to folk taxonomy). ... Divisions Green algae land plants (embryophytes) non-vascular embryophytes Hepatophyta - liverworts Anthocerophyta - hornworts Bryophyta - mosses vascular plants (tracheophytes) seedless vascular plants Lycopodiophyta - clubmosses Equisetophyta - horsetails Pteridophyta - true ferns Psilotophyta - whisk ferns Ophioglossophyta - adderstongue ferns seed plants (spermatophytes) †Pteridospermatophyta - seed ferns Pinophyta - conifers Cycadophyta - cycads Ginkgophyta - ginkgo Gnetophyta - gnetae Magnoliophyta - flowering... Classes Magnoliopsida- Dicots Liliopsida- Monocots The flowering plants (also called angiosperms) are a major group of land plants. ... Magnoliopsida is the botanical name for a class: this name is formed by replacing the termination -aceae in the name Magnoliaceae by the termination -opsida (Art 16 of the ICBN). ... Families Apiaceae (carrot family) Araliaceae (ginseng family) Pittosporaceae Griseliniaceae Torriceliaceae The Apiales are an order of flowering plants. ... Genera See text Ref: Hortiplex 2003-11-14 The Apiaceae, the carrot or parsley family, are a family of usually aromatic plants with hollow stems, including parsley, carrot, and other relatives. ... Binomial name Foeniculum vulgare P. Mill. ... In biology, binomial nomenclature is the formal method of naming species. ... Philip Miller (1691 - 1771) was a botanist of Scottish descent. ... Species See text Ferula is the Ferula or Giant fennel genus of plants of the Apiaceae family, including: - Asafoetida - Giant fennel - Galbanum - Musk root - Ferula Categories: Apiaceae ... In biology, a species is the basic unit of biodiversity. ... In biology, a genus (plural genera) is a taxonomic grouping. ... Binomial name Foeniculum vulgare P. Mill. ... Botany is the scientific study of plant life. ... Europe is conventionally considered one of the seven continents of Earth which, in this case, is more a cultural and political distinction than a physiographic one, leading to various perspectives about Europes borders. ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... World map showing the location of Asia. ... In biological classification, family (Latin: familia, plural familiae) is 1) a rank or 2) a taxon in that rank. ... Genera See text Ref: Hortiplex 2003-11-14 The Apiaceae, the carrot or parsley family, are a family of usually aromatic plants with hollow stems, including parsley, carrot, and other relatives. ...


It is a highly aromatic perennial herb, erect, glaucous green, and grows to 2 m tall. The leaves grow up to 40 cm long; they are finely dissected, with the ultimate segments filiform, about 0.5 mm wide. The flowers are produced in terminal compound umbels 5—15 cm wide, each umbel section with 20—50 tiny yellow flowers on short pedicels. The fruit is a dry seed from 4—9 mm long, half as wide or less, and grooved. A Red Valerian, a perennial plant. ... A herb (pronounced hurb in Commonwealth English and urb in American English) is a plant grown for culinary, medicinal, or in some cases even spiritual value. ... In botany, a leaf is an above-ground plant organ specialized for photosynthesis. ... Clivia miniata right hereflowers. ... Umbels on Wild Carrot (Daucus carota) An umbel is an inflorescence which consists of a number of short flower stalks (called pedicels) which are equal in length and spread from a common point, somewhat like umbrella ribs. ... Fruit stall in Barcelona, Catalonia. ... A ripe red jalapeno cut open to show the seeds For other uses, see Seed (disambiguation). ...


Fennel is used as a food plant by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including the Mouse Moth and the Anise Swallowtail. A larva (Latin; plural larvae) is a juvenile form of animal with indirect development, undergoing metamorphosis (for example, insects or amphibians). ... Super Families Butterflies Hesperioidea Papilionoidea Moths Micropterigoidea Heterobathmioidea Eriocranioidea Acanthopteroctetoidea Lophocoronoidea Neopseustoidea Mnesarchaeoidea Hepialoidea Nepticuloidea Incurvarioidea Palaephatoidea Tischeriodea Simaethistoidea Tineoidea Gracillarioidea Yponomeutoidea Gelechioidea Zygaenoidea Sesioidea Cossoidea Tortricoidea Choreutoida Urodoidea Galacticoidea Schreckensteinioidea Epermenioidea Pterophoroidea Aluctoidea Immoidea Axioidea Hyblaeoidea Thyridoidea Whalleyanoidea Pyraloidea Mimallonoidea Lasiocampoidea Geometroidea Drepanoidea Bombycoidea Calliduloidae Hedyloidea Noctuoidea Families About... Binomial name Amphipyra tragopoginis Clerck, 1759 The Mouse Moth (Amphipyra tragopoginis) is a moth of the family Noctuidae. ... Binomial name Papilio zelicaon Lucas 1858 The Anise Swallowtail, Papilio zelicaon, is a common swallowtail butterfly of western North America. ...

Contents


Cultivation and uses

Fennel is widely cultivated both in its native range and elsewhere of for its edible, strongly flavoured leaves and seeds. The flavour is similar to that of anise and star anise, though usually not so strong. The Italian translation of fennel, namely 'finochio' is a term commonly used to denote a homosexual. Binomial name Pimpinella anisum L. Anise or Aniseed, less commonly anís (stressed on the second syllable) (Pimpinella anisum) is a flowering plant in the family Apiaceae, native to the eastern Mediterranean region and southwest Asia. ... Binomial name Illicium verum Hook. ...

Florence fennel "bulb"
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Florence fennel "bulb"

The Florence fennel (F. vulgare Azoricum Group) is a selection with inflated leaf bases which form a sort of bulb. It comes mainly from India and Egypt and it has a mild anise-like flavour, but is more aromatic and sweeter. Its flavour comes from anethole, an aromatic compound also found in anise and star anise. Florence fennel is smaller than the wild type and has inflated leaf bases which are eaten as a vegetable, both raw and cooked. There are several cultivars of Florence fennel, which is also known by several other names, notably the Italian name finocchio. In United States supermarkets, it is often mislabeled as "anise". Image File history File links Image for fennel from here: http://sxc. ... Image File history File links Image for fennel from here: http://sxc. ... Under the ICNCP, a Cultivar Group is a gathering of cultivars. ... Shallot bulbs A bulb is an underground vertical shoot that has modified leaves (or thickened leaf bases) that are used as food storage organs by a dormant plant. ... Anethole Anethole (or trans-anethole) is an aromatic compound that accounts for the distinctive licorice flavor of anise, fennel, and star anise. ... Binomial name Pimpinella anisum L. Anise or Aniseed, less commonly anís (stressed on the second syllable) (Pimpinella anisum) is a flowering plant in the family Apiaceae, native to the eastern Mediterranean region and southwest Asia. ... Binomial name Illicium verum Hook. ... Vegetables in a market Venn diagram representing the relationship between (botanical) fruits and vegetables. ... This Osteospermum Pink Whirls is a successful cultivar. ...


Fennel has become naturalised along roadsides, in pastures, and other open sites in many regions, including northern Europe, the United States, southern Canada and in much of Asia and Australia. It is propagated by seed, and is considered to be a weed in Australia and the United States. A weed is an unwanted plant. ...


Culinary uses

Fennel, from Koehler's Medicinal-plants (1887)
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Fennel, from Koehler's Medicinal-plants (1887)

The bulb, foliage, and seeds of the fennel plant have all secure places in the culinary traditions of the world. Dried fennel seed is an aromatic, anise-flavoured spice; brown or green in colour, they slowly turn a dull grey as the seed ages (for cooking, green seeds are optimal). Image File history File links Koeh-148. ... Image File history File links Koeh-148. ... Cooking is the act of preparing food for consumption. ... Shop with spices in Morocco A spice is a dried seed, fruit, root, bark or vegetative substance used in nutritionally insignificant quantities as a food additive for the purpose of flavouring. ...


Fennel seeds are sometimes confused with aniseed, which is very similar in taste and appearance, though smaller. Indians often chew fennel seed (or saunf) as a mouth-freshener. Fennel is also used as a flavouring in some natural toothpastes. Some people employ it as a diuretic, while others use it to improve the milk supply of breastfeeding mothers. Binomial name Pimpinella anisum L. Anise or Aniseed, less commonly anís (stressed on the second syllable) (Pimpinella anisum) is a flowering plant in the family Apiaceae, native to the eastern Mediterranean region and southwest Asia. ... Modern toothpaste gel Toothpaste is a paste or gel used to clean and improve the aesthetic appearance and health of teeth. ... A diuretic is any drug that elevates the rate of bodily urine excretion. ... A breastfeeding infant Breastfeeding is the process of a woman feeding an infant or young child with milk from her breasts, usually directly from the nipples. ...


Many cultures in the Indian subcontinent and the Middle East incorporate fennel seed into their culinary traditions. It is an essential ingredient in the Bengali spice mixture panch phoron and in Chinese five-spice powders. It is known as saunf or moti saunf in Hindi and Urdu, mouri in Bengali, and shombu in the Tamil language. In the west, fennel seed is a very common ingredient in Italian sausages and northern European rye breads. Satellite image of the Indian subcontinent Map of South Asia (see note) The Indian subcontinent is a peninsular landmass of the Asian continent occupying the Indian Plate and extending into the Indian Ocean, bordered on the north by the Eurasian Plate. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Bengali cuisine is a style of food preparation that originated in Bengal, a region in the northeast of South Asia which is now divided between the independent country of Bangladesh and the Indian state of West Bengal. ... Panch Phoron (also called Panch Phoran, Panch Puran, or Bengali Five-Spice Mix) is an Indian spice mixture, consisting of equal parts of five spices: fenugreek (methi) nigella seed (kalo jira) mustard seed (rai or shorshe) fennel seed (mouri) cumin seed (jeera) In some variations, wild onion is used in... Five-spice powder (五香粉, wǔxiāngfěn in hanyu pinyin) is a convenient seasoning for Chinese cuisine, particularly Cantonese cuisine. ... Hindi (हिन्दी hind), an Indo-European language spoken mainly in North, Central, and West India, is the official language of the Indian Union. ... The phrase Zaban-e Urdu-e Mualla written in Urdu Urdu () is an Indo-European language of the Indo-Aryan family that developed under Persian, Turkish, and Arabic influence in South Asia during the Delhi Sultanate and Mughal Empire (1200-1800). ... Bengali or Bangla (বাংলা ) is an Indo-Aryan language of South Asia that evolved as a successor to Sanskrit, Pali, and Prakrit. ... Tamil (தமிழ் ) is a classical language and one of the major languages of the Dravidian language family. ...


Many egg, fish, and other dishes employ fresh or dried fennel leaves. Florence fennel is a key ingredient in some Italian and German salads, often tossed with chicory and avocado, or it can be braised and served as a warm side dish. One may also blanch and/or marinate the leaves, or cook them in risotto. In all cases, the leaves lend their characteristically mild, anise-like flavour. A carton of free-range chicken eggs Ostrich egg Bird eggs are a common food source. ... Orders See text. ... A salad is a food item generally served either before or after the main dish as a separate course, as a main course in itself, or as a side dish accompanying the main dish. ... Species C. endivia - cultivated endive - wild endive - common chicory Chicory is the common name given to the flowering plants in genus Cichorium of the family Asteraceae. ... Binomial name Persea americana Mill. ... Braising is cooking with moist heat, typically in a covered pot with a small amount of liquid. ... Wikibooks Cookbook has more about this subject: Blanching Blanching is a cooking term that describes a process of food preparation wherein the food substance is rapidly plunged into boiling water and then removed after a brief, timed interval and then plunged into iced water or placed under cold running water. ... Marination, also known as marinating, is the process of soaking foods in a seasoned, often acidic, liquid before cooking. ... Risotto prepared with mushrooms and scallions. ...


Medicinal uses

Essential oil of Fennel is included in European and some national pharmacopoeias. It is traditionally used in drugs to treat chills and stomach problems. An essential oil is a concentrated, hydrophobic liquid containing volatile aromatic compounds extracted from plants. ... Pharmacopoeia (literally, the art of the drug compounder), in its modern technical sense, is a book containing directions for the identification of samples and the preparation of compound medicines, and published by the authority of a government or a medical or pharmaceutical society. ...


Perfumery

Fennel essential oil is used in soaps, and some perfumes. Soap most commonly appears in bar form. ... Perfume is a mixture of fragrant essential oils and aroma compounds, fixatives, and solvents used to give the human body, objects, and living spaces a pleasant smell. ...


Etymology and history

Etymologically, the word fennel developed from Middle English fenel, fenyl; Anglo-Saxon fenol, finol, from Latin feniculum, fœniculum, diminutive of fenum, fœnum, "hay". Etymology is the study of the origins of words. ... Middle English is the name given by historical linguistics to the diverse forms of the English language spoken between the Norman invasion in 1066 and the mid-to-late 15th century, when the Chancery Standard, a form of London-based English, began to become widespread, a process aided by the... Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ...


In Ancient Greek fennel was called μάραθον marathon. This is the origin of the placename Marathon (meaning place of fennel), site of the Battle of Marathon in 490 BC. Greek mythology claims Prometheus used the stalk of a fennel plant to steal fire from the gods. Note: This article contains special characters. ... Marathon (Greek, Modern: Μαραθώνας Marathona or Marathonas, Ancient/ Katharevousa: Μαραθών, Marathon) is a town in Greece, the site of the battle of Marathon in 490 BC, in which the Athenian army defeated the Persians. ... Combatants Athens and Plataea Persia Commanders Miltiades, Callimachus† Darius I of Persia, Artaphernes Strength About 10,000 Athenians and 1,000 Plataeans 20,000-60,000 by modern estimates 1 Casualties 192 Athenians and 11 Plateans dead 6,400 dead, 7 ships captured 1 Ancient sources give numbers ranging from... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 540s BC 530s BC 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC - 490s BC - 480s BC 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC Years: 495 BC 494 BC 493 BC 492 BC 491 BC - 490 BC - 489 BC 488 BC... // Greek mythology consists in part in a large collection of narratives that explain the origins of the world and detail the lives and adventures of a wide variety of gods, goddesses, heroes, and heroines. ... This article is about the mythological figure. ...


In medieval times fennel was used in conjunction with St John's wort to keep away witchcraft and other evil things. This might have originated because fennel can be used as an insect repellent. The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Binomial name Hypericum perforatum L. St Johns wort (pronounced ...wurt) used alone refers to the species Hypericum perforatum, also known as Klamath weed or Goat weed, but is used with qualifiers to refer to any species of the genus Hypericum. ... Witchcraft, in various historical, religious and mythical contexts, is the use of certain kinds of alleged supernatural or magical powers. ... Commercial insect repellents. ...


Fennel is thought to be one of the nine herbs held sacred by the Anglo-Saxons. The others are still not totally certain, but they seem to include mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris), greater plantain (Plantago major), watercress (Nasturtium officinale), wild chamomile (Matricaria recutita), stinging nettle (Urtica dioica), crab apple (Malus sylvestris), chervil (Anthriscus cerefolium), and viper's bugloss (Echium vulgare). The identity of the ninth remains a mystery. A herb (pronounced hurb in Commonwealth English and urb in American English) is a plant grown for culinary, medicinal, or in some cases even spiritual value. ... The famous parade helmet found at Sutton Hoo, probably belonging to King Raedwald of East Anglia circa 625. ... Binomial name Artemisia vulgaris L. Mugwort or Common Wormwood (Artemisia vulgaris) is a species from the daisy family Asteraceae. ... Binomial name Plantago major L. The Broadleaf Plantain or Greater Plantago (Plantago major) is a member of the plantago family, Plantaginaceae. ... Species Nasturtium nasturtium-aquaticumL. Nasturtium microphyllumBoenn ex Rchb. ... Chamomile flowers The name Chamomile or Camomile is ambiguous and can refer to several distinct species. ... Binomial name Urtica dioica L. Detail of flowering stinging nettle The stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) is a herbaceous flowering plant native to Europe, Asia, northern Africa, and North America, and is the best known member of the nettle genus Urtica. ... Species - Southern Crab - Siberian Crabapple - Sweet Crabapple - Apple - Japanese Crabapple - Oregon Crab - Chinese Crabapple - Prairie Crab - Asian Wild Apple - European Wild Apple Malus, the apples, is a genus of about 30-35 species of small deciduous trees or shrubs in the family Rosaceae, including most importantly the domesticated Orchard or... Binomial name Anthriscus cerefolium (L.) Hoffm. ... Binomial name Echium vulgare L. Vipers Bugloss (Echium vulgare) is a short to medium perennial with rough, hairy, lanceolate leaves. ...

Herbs, Seasonings and Spices
Seasonings (applied on or cooked in food) cardamom · cayenne pepper · chile powder · chili powder · cinnamon · curry powder · garlic powder · cumin · ginger · ground pepper · lemon · liquorice · onion powder · red pepper · saccharin · salt · stevia · sugar · tamarind · tarragon · vanilla · vinegar · white mustard ·
Herbs & Spices (applied on or cooked in food) anise · basil · bay leaf · fenugreek · fennel · marjoram · mint · nutmeg · oregano · paprika · parsley · peppermint · rosemary · saffron · sage · sarsaparilla · sassafras · spearmint · savory · turmeric · thyme ·

A herb (pronounced hurb in Commonwealth English and urb in American English) is a plant grown for culinary, medicinal, or in some cases even spiritual value. ... Seasoning is the process of adding flavours, or enhancing natural flavour of any type of food. ... Shop with spices in Morocco A spice is a dried seed, fruit, root, bark or vegetative substance used in nutritionally insignificant quantities as a food additive for the purpose of flavouring. ... Genera Aframomum Amomum Elettaria The name cardamom (sometimes written cardamon) is used for species within three genera of the Ginger family (Zingiberaceae), namely Elettaria, Amomum and Aframomum. ... A large red cayenne Cayenne pepper is a very hot red powder used to flavor dishes; its name comes from the city of Cayenne in French Guiana. ... Chile Powder for sale in Bolivia Chile powder is the ground, dried fruit of one or more varieties of chile pepper, most commonly red pepper or cayenne pepper, both of the species Capsicum Annuum. ... Chili powder (also called chili mix) is a spice mix consisting of various ratios of dried ground chile peppers, cumin, garlic and oregano. ... Binomial name Cinnamomum verum J.Presl Cassia (Indonesian cinnamon) is also commonly called (and sometimes sold as) cinnamon. ... Curry powder is a mixture of spices of widely varying composition developed by the British during their colonial rule of India as a means of approximating the taste of Indian cuisine at home. ... Garlic powder is a spice, or powder, made from pounding garlic. ... Binomial name Cuminum cyminum L. Cumin (Cuminum cyminum) is a flowering plant in the family Apiaceae, native to the eastern Mediterranean region east to India. ... Binomial name Zingiber officinale Roscoe Ginger root is used extensively as a spice in many if not most cuisines of the world. ... Binomial name Piper nigrum L. Black pepper (Piper nigrum) is a flowering vine in the family Piperaceae, cultivated for its fruit, which is usually dried and used as a spice and seasoning. ... Binomial name Citrus × limon (L.) Burm. ... Binomial name Glycyrrhiza glabra L. Liquorice (Br. ... Wikibooks Cookbook has more about this subject: Onion powder Onion powder is a spice used in cooking. ... Species C. annuum (incl. ... The chemical structure of saccharin. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Species About 150 species, including: Stevia eupatoria Stevia ovata Stevia plummerae Stevia rebaudiana Stevia salicifolia Stevia serrata Stevia (also called sweetleaf, sweet leaf or sugarleaf) is a genus of about 150 species of herbs and shrubs belonging to the Asteraceae (sunflower) family, native to subtropical and tropical South America and... Magnified view of refined sugar crystals. ... Binomial name Tamarindus indica The Tamarind (alternative name Indian date, translation of Arabic تمر هندي tamr hindī) is a tropical tree, originally from east Africa but now introduced into most of tropical Asia as well as Latin America. ... Binomial name Artemisia dracunculus L. Tarragon or dragon (Artemisia dracunculus) is a perennial herb, a member of the daisy family (Asteraceae) and a close relative of wormwood. ... For other uses, see vanilla (disambiguation). ... Vinegar is often infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Binomial name Sinapis alba White mustard (Sinapis alba) is a plant of the family Cruciferae. ... Binomial name Pimpinella anisum L. Anise or Aniseed, less commonly anís (stressed on the second syllable) (Pimpinella anisum) is a flowering plant in the family Apiaceae, native to the eastern Mediterranean region and southwest Asia. ... Binomial name Ocimum basilicum L. Basil (Ocimum basilicum) of the Family Lamiaceae is also known as Albahaca, St. ... bay leaves Bay leaf (plural bay leaves) are the aromatic leaves of several species of the Laurel family (Lauraceae). ... Binomial name Trigonella foenum-graecum L. Fenugreek, also called methi, is a crop plant grown as a potherb and for the spice made from its seeds. ... Binomial name Origanum majorana L. Marjoram (Origanum majorana, Lamiaceae) is a cold-sensitive perennial herb or undershrub with sweet pine and citrus flavors. ... Species See text The true mints (genus Mentha) are perennial herbs in the Family Lamiaceae. ... Species About 100 species, including: Myristica argentea Myristica fragrans Myristica malabarica The nutmegs Myristica are a genus of evergreen trees indigenous to tropical southeast Asia and Australasia. ... Binomial name Origanum vulgare L. Oregano (Origanum vulgare) (Catalan: orenga, Spanish: orégano, Portuguese: orégão, Italian: origano) is a spicy, Mediterranean, perennial herb, particularly common in Greek and Italian cuisines. ... Binomial name Capsicum annuum L. Paprika, Capsicum annuum, is a sweet-to-mildly hot cultivar of the chile pepper of the family Solanaceae. ... Species Parsley (Petroselinum crispum) is a bright green, biennial herb that is very common in Middle Eastern, European, and American cooking. ... Binomial name Mentha × piperita L. Peppermint (Mentha × piperita) is a (usually) sterile hybrid mint, a cross between Watermint (Mentha aquatica) and Spearmint (Mentha spicata). ... Binomial name Rosmarinus officinalis L. Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) is a woody, perennial herb with fragrant evergreen needle-like leaves. ... Binomial name Crocus sativus L. Saffron (IPA: ) is a spice derived from the flower of the saffron crocus (Crocus sativus), a species of crocus in the family Iridaceae. ... Binomial name Salvia officinalis L. Common sage (Salvia officinalis) is a small evergreen subshrub, with woody stems, grayish leaves, and blue to purplish flowers native to southern Europe and the Mediterranean region. ... Binomial name Smilax regelii Killip & Morton Sarsaparilla (Smilax regelii and other closely related species of Smilax) is a vine that bears roots with many useful properties. ... Species Sassafras albidum Sassafras tzumu Sassafras is a genus of two species of deciduous trees in the family Lauraceae, native to eastern North America and eastern Asia. ... Binomial name Mentha spicata Crantz Spearmint (Mentha spicata, syn ), yields an aromatic and carminative oil, referred to as oil of spearmint. Many people use the name scotch spearmint for gingermint (Mentha x gracilis, syn ), a hybrid of spearmint and wild mint (Mentha arvensis). ... Species hortensis (summer savory) montana (winter savory) viminea (serpentine savory) Savory is an herb, of the genus Satureja, best known for flavoring beans. ... Binomial name Curcuma longa Linnaeus Turmeric (Curcuma longa, also known as tumeric) is a spice commonly used in curries and other South Asian cooking. ... Species About 350 species, including: Thymus adamovicii Thymus bracteosus Thymus broussonetii Thymus caespititius Thymus camphoratus Thymus capitatus Thymus capitellatus Thymus carnosus Thymus cephalotus Thymus cherlerioides Thymus ciliatus Thymus cilicicus Thymus cimicinus Thymus comosus Thymus comptus Thymus doerfleri Thymus glabrescens Thymus herba-barona Thymus hirsutus Thymus hyemalis Thymus integer Thymus lanuginosus...

External link

  • Fennel Foeniculm vulgare - History, Organic growing advice, companion planting, container growing, Medicinal and culinary uses
  • Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill.) - Katzer's Spice Pages
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Foeniculum vulgare

  Results from FactBites:
 
Fennel - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (829 words)
Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) is the most important species in the genus Foeniculum (treated as the sole species by many botanists), and is native to southern Europe (especially by the Mediterranean) and southwestern Asia.
Fennel is widely cultivated both in its native range and elsewhere of for its edible, strongly flavoured leaves and seeds.
Fennel is thought to be one of the nine herbs held sacred by the Anglo-Saxons.
Fennel (654 words)
Culpeper recommended fennel to break kidney stones, to relieve gout, as an antidote for mushroom poisoning, a detoxifyer of the liver, to cure colic in infants, and to relieve congestion of the lungs.
Fennel was one of the four "warming seeds" and declared by the Anglo-Saxons to be one of the nine sacred herbs that would cure the nine causes of medieval diseases.
Fennel, a native to the Mediterranean, was introduced to Europe in the eighth century by the emperor Charlemagne, who cultivated the herb on his imperial farms in Germany.
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