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Encyclopedia > Femoral ring
Femoral ring
The relations of the femoral and abdominal inguinal rings, seen from within the abdomen. Right side. (Femoral ring visible at center.)
Structures passing behind the inguinal ligament. (Femoral ring labeled at top, second from the right.)
Latin anulus femoralis
Gray's subject #157 625
Dorlands/Elsevier a_50/12143696

The femoral ring is the base of the femoral canal. It is directed upward and is oval in form, its long diameter being directed transversely and measuring about 1.25 cm. Image File history File links Gray547. ... Inguinal ring can refer to: Superficial inguinal ring Deep inguinal ring Category: ... Image File history File links Gray546. ... The inguinal ligament is a band running from the pubic tubercle to the anterior superior iliac spine. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... Elseviers logo. ... The lateral compartment of the femoral sheath contains the femoral artery, and the intermediate the femoral vein, while the medial and smallest compartment is named the femoral canal, and contains some lymphatic vessels and a lymph gland imbedded in a small amount of areolar tissue. ...


The femoral ring is bounded in front by the inguinal ligament, behind by the Pectineus covered by the pectineal fascia, medially by the crescentic base of the lacunar ligament, and laterally by the fibrous septum on the medial side of the femoral vein. The inguinal ligament is a band running from the pubic tubercle to the anterior superior iliac spine. ... The pectineus muscle is a muscle in the inner thigh, by the femur. ... The lacunar Ligament (Gimbernat’s ligament) is that part of the aponeurosis of the external oblique muscle which is reflected backward and lateralward, and is attached to the pectineal line of the pubis. ... Grays Fig. ...


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This article was originally based on an entry from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy. As such, some of the information contained herein may be outdated. Please edit the article if this is the case, and feel free to remove this notice when it is no longer relevant. GPnotebook is a British medical database for general practitioners (GPs. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body, commonly known as Grays Anatomy, is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
CHAPTER 15: THE THIGH AND KNEE (5580 words)
13-1 and 15-3) is a gap in the fascia lata inferolateral to the pubic tubercle and overlying the femoral vein.
The medial boundary of the ring is sharp and ligamentous.
15-1 The compartments of the thigh are the anterior, for the quadriceps (femoral nerve); the medial, for the adductors (obturator nerve); and the posterior, for the hamstrings (sciatic nerve).
Med-Lib - Medical Online Library - English Articles - Oxford Textbook of Surgery - Femoral hernia (1249 words)
Femoral hernias are the third most common type of groin hernia, after indirect and direct inguinal hernias and account for approximately 6 per cent of all abdominal wall hernias.
Although a femoral hernia may enlarge in the thigh, the femoral neck is bounded by the unyielding lacunar ligament medially.
Femoral hernias should not be treated conservatively: it is impossible to control the hernial neck with a truss and the incidence of strangulation is high, especially in elderly women.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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