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Encyclopedia > Femoral nerve
Nerve: Femoral nerve
The lumbar plexus and its branches. (Femoral labeled at bottom left.)
Femoral sheath laid open to show its three compartments. (Femoral nerve visible in yellow.)
Latin nervus femoralis
Gray's subject #212 955
Innervates anterior compartment of thigh
MeSH Femoral+nerve
Dorlands/Elsevier n_05/12565782

The femoral nerve, the largest branch of the lumbar plexus, arises from the dorsal divisions of the second, third, and fourth lumbar nerves. It descends through the fibers of the Psoas major, emerging from the muscle at the lower part of its lateral border, and passes down between it and the Iliacus, behind the iliac fascia; it then runs beneath the inguinal ligament, into the thigh, and splits into an anterior and a posterior division. Under the inguinal ligament, it is separated from the femoral artery by a portion of the Psoas major. Image File history File links Gray823. ... Grays Fig. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (500x623, 157 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Wikipedia:Grays Anatomy images with missing articles 11 Abdominal internal oblique muscle Abdominal external oblique... The femoral sheath (crural sheath) is formed by a prolongation downward, behind the inguinal ligament, of the fasciæ which line the abdomen, the transversalis fascia being continued down in front of the femoral vessels and the iliac fascia behind them. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... The anterior fascial compartment of thigh contains the knee extensors and hip flexors: sartorius (the longest muscle in the human body) quadriceps (rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, vastus intermedius, vastus medialis) articularis genu. ... Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) is a huge controlled vocabulary (or metadata system) for the purpose of indexing journal articles and books in the life sciences. ... Elseviers logo. ... Grays Fig. ... The formation of the spinal nerve from the dorsal and ventral roots Grays Fig. ... The psoas major is a muscle of the human abdomen. ... The Iliacus muscle is a muscle of the human body. ... The iliac fascia has the following connections: laterally, to the whole length of the inner lip of the iliac crest. ... The inguinal ligament is a band running from the pubic tubercle to the anterior superior iliac spine. ... In humans the thigh is the area between the pelvis and buttocks and the knee. ... The inguinal ligament is a band running from the pubic tubercle to the anterior superior iliac spine. ... Femoral artery and its major branches - right thigh, anterior view. ... The psoas major is a muscle of the human abdomen. ...

Contents

In the abdomen

Within the abdomen the femoral nerve gives off small branches to the Iliacus, and a branch which is distributed upon the upper part of the femoral artery; the latter branch may arise in the thigh. willy The Iliacus muscle is a muscle of the human body. ...


In the thigh

Anterior division

In the thigh the anterior division of the femoral nerve gives off anterior cutaneous and muscular branches.

  • Anterior cutaneous branches: The anterior cutaneous branches comprise the following nerves: intermediate cutaneous nerve and medial cutaneous nerve.
  • Muscular branches (rami musculares): The nerve to the Pectineus arises immediately below the inguinal ligament, and passes behind the femoral sheath to enter the anterior surface of the muscle; it is often duplicated. The nerve to the Sartorius arises in common with the intermediate cutaneous.

The anterior cutaneous branches of the femoral nerve consist of the following nerves: intermediate cutaneous nerve and medial cutaneous nerve. ... The pectineus muscle is a muscle in the inner thigh, by the femur. ... For the muscle, see sartorius muscle. ...

Posterior division

The posterior division of the femoral nerve gives off the saphenous nerve, and muscular and articular branches.

  • The saphenous nerve (n. saphenus; long or internal saphenous nerve) is the largest cutaneous branch of the femoral nerve.
  • The muscular branches supply the four parts of the Quadriceps femoris.
    • The branch to the Rectus femoris enters the upper part of the deep surface of the muscle, and supplies a filament to the hip-joint.
    • The branch to the Vastus lateralis, of large size, accompanies the descending branch of the lateral femoral circumflex artery to the lower part of the muscle. It gives off an articular filament to the knee-joint.
    • The branch to the Vastus medialis descends lateral to the femoral vessels in company with the saphenous nerve. It enters the muscle about its middle, and gives off a filament, which can usually be traced downward, on the surface of the muscle, to the knee-joint.
    • The branches to the Vastus intermedius, two or three in number, enter the anterior surface of the muscle about the middle of the thigh; a filament from one of these descends through the muscle to the Articularis genu and the knee-joint. The articular branch to the hip-joint is derived from the nerve to the Rectus femoris.
  • The articular branches to the knee-joint are three in number.
    • One, a long slender filament, is derived from the nerve to the Vastus lateralis; it penetrates the capsule of the joint on its anterior aspect.
    • Another, derived from the nerve to the Vastus medialis, can usually be traced downward on the surface of this muscle to near the joint; it then penetrates the muscular fibers, and accompanies the articular branch of the highest genicular artery, pierces the medial side of the articular capsule, and supplies the synovial membrane.
    • The third branch is derived from the nerve to the Vastus intermedius.

The Saphenous Nerve (long or internal saphenous nerve) is the largest cutaneous branch of the femoral nerve. ... ... The Rectus femoris muscle is a muscle of the human body. ... The Vastus lateralis muscle is a muscle of the human body. ... The lateral femoral circumflex artery (lateral circumflex femoral artery, external circumflex artery) is an artery in the upper thigh. ... The vastus medialis is the muscle that brings the kneecap inward, holding it in the position it should be. ... The Saphenous Nerve (long or internal saphenous nerve) is the largest cutaneous branch of the femoral nerve. ... The Vastus intermedius muscle is a muscle of the human body. ... The Articularis genu (Subcrureus) is a small muscle, usually distinct from the Vastus intermedius, but occasionally blended with it; it arises from the anterior surface of the lower part of the body of the femur, and is inserted into the upper part of the synovial membrane of the knee-joint. ... An x-ray of a human knee Grays Fig. ... Bones of the Hip In anatomy, the hip is the bony projection of the femur, known as the greater trochanter, and the overlying muscle and fat. ... The Rectus femoris muscle is a muscle of the human body. ... The Vastus lateralis muscle is a muscle of the human body. ... The vastus medialis is the muscle that brings the kneecap inward, holding it in the position it should be. ... The descending genicular artery (highest genicular artery) arises from the femoral just before it passes through the opening in the tendon of the Adductor magnus, and immediately divides into a saphenous and a musculo-articular branch. ... The synovium or synovial membrane is a thin, weak layer of tissue which lines the non-cartilaginous surfaces within the joint space, sealing it from the surrounding tissue. ... The Vastus intermedius muscle is a muscle of the human body. ...

Additional images

External links

This article was originally based on an entry from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy. As such, some of the information contained herein may be outdated. Please edit the article if this is the case, and feel free to remove this notice when it is no longer relevant. GPnotebook is a British medical database for general practitioners (GPs. ... Duke University is a private coeducational research university located in Durham, North Carolina, USA. Founded by Methodists and Quakers in the present-day town of Trinity in 1838, the school moved to Durham in 1892. ... MedlinePlus (medlineplus. ... The State University of New York Health Science Center at Brooklyn, better known as SUNY Downstate Medical Center, is an academic medical center and is the only one of its kind in the Borough of Brooklyn in New York City. ... The Medical University of Vienna , formerly the faculty of medicine of the University of Vienna, became an independent university on January 1, 2004. ... Memorial University of Newfoundland, (popularly known as Memorial University or MUN) is a comprehensive university located primarily in St. ... The Medical University of Vienna , formerly the faculty of medicine of the University of Vienna, became an independent university on January 1, 2004. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, in the United States. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body (or Grays Anatomy as it has more commonly become known) is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Chapter 30: Blood vessels, lymphatic drainage and nerves of the abdomen (2919 words)
The lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (chiefly from L2), which is frequently bound with the femoral nerve, enters the thigh posterior to the inguinal ligament.
The femoral nerve (L2 to 4) emerges from the lateral side of the psoas major, descends between the psoas and iliacus, and enters the thigh posterior to the inguinal ligament.
The genitofemoral nerve (chiefly L2) divides into 1) a genital branch, which enters the inguinal canal through the deep ring and supplies the cremaster and scrotum (or labium majus), and (2) a femoral branch, which enters the femoral sheath and supplies the skin of the femoral triangle.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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