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Encyclopedia > Felice and Boudleaux Bryant
Boudleaux and Felice Bryant

Felice Bryant (August 7, 1925April 22, 2003) and Boudleaux Bryant (February 13, 1920June 26, 1987) were an American wife and husband country music songwriting team who were also at the forefront of the evolution of pop music. They are perhaps best known for their song "Rocky Top", plus the Everly Brothers' hits "All I Have to Do Is Dream" and "Bye Bye Love". Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... A songwriter is someone who writes either the lyrics or the music for songs. ... Bold text For popular forms of music in general, see Popular music. ... Rocky Top is an official state song of the state of Tennessee, as well as a popular fight song for the University of Tennessee Volunteers. ... Don (born February 1, 1937 in Brownie, a small coal-mining town (now defunct) near Central City, Muhlenberg County, Kentucky) and Phil Everly (born January 18, 1939 in Chicago, Illinois) are country-influenced rock and roll performers who had their greatest success in the 1950s. ... All I Have to Do Is Dream is a popular song. ... Bye Bye Love is a popular song. ...

Contents

Beginnings

Boudleaux was born Diadorius Boudleaux Bryant in Shellman, Georgia and was trained as a classical violinist. During the 1937–38 season he performed with the Atlanta Philharmonic Orchestra but had more interest in country fiddling and joined a western music band. In 1945 he met Matilda Genevieve Scaduto while performing at a hotel in her hometown of Milwaukee, Wisconsin and their meeting resulted in a marriage of two future Hall of Fame songwriters. Shellman is a city located in Randolph County, Georgia. ... Classical music is a broad, somewhat imprecise term, referring to music produced in, or rooted in the traditions of, European art, ecclesiastical and concert music, encompassing a broad period from roughly 1000 to the present day. ... A violinist is an instrumentalist who plays the violin. ... Nickname: Location in Fulton County and the state of Georgia Coordinates: , Country State Counties Fulton, DeKalb Government  - Mayor Shirley Franklin (D) Area  - City  132. ... For other places with the same name, see Milwaukee (disambiguation). ...


Felice, as Matilda Genevieve Scaduto's husband affectionately called her, came from an Italian family of music lovers and although she had done some singing, she was a poet at heart with a natural gift for writing songs that combined with her husband's music expertise, led to them becoming one of the most successful writing teams in modern music.


Songwriting career

During the first years of their marriage, the Bryants struggled to make a living and, living in a mobile home, Felice passed some of her spare time writing songs, eventually accumulating a collection of upwards of eighty tunes. They solicited a number of country music artists in an attempt to sell their compositions but were either ignored or politely rejected until singer Little Jimmy Dickens recorded "Country Boy". The song went to No. 7 on the 1948 country charts but more importantly, its success opened the door to a working relationship with Fred Rose at Acuff-Rose Music in Nashville, Tennessee. In 1950, the Bryants moved to Nashville to work full time at song writing. A modern double-wide manufactured home. ... James Cecil Dickens (born December 19, 1920 from Bolt, West Virginia), Hillbilly singers never will come any hillbilly-er than Little Jimmy Dickens. ... Fred Rose (August 24, 1898 - December 1, 1954) was an American Hall of Fame songwriter and music publishing executive. ... Acuff-Rose Music was a Nashville, Tennessee music publishing firm. ... Nickname: Location in Davidson County and the state of Tennessee Coordinates: , Country United States State Tennessee Counties Davidson County Founded: 1779 Incorporated: 1806 Government  - Mayor Bill Purcell (D) Area  - City  526. ...


The Bryants wrote more songs for Little Jimmy Dickens as well as for popular country artist Carl Smith and at the same time released four 45 rpm singles of their own that met with modest success. In 1957 the Bryants came to national prominence in both country music and pop music when they wrote a string of hugely successful songs for the Everly Brothers followed by successes for others such as Roy Orbison and Buddy Holly. Their prolific and quality compositions would produce hit records for many stars from a variety of musical genres including Tony Bennett, Sonny James, Eddy Arnold, Charley Pride, Nazareth, Jim Reeves, Leo Sayer, Simon and Garfunkel, Sarah Vaughan, Grateful Dead, Elvis Costello, Count Basie, Dean Martin, Ray Charles, Bob Dylan (Self Portrait has one of her tracks and one co-write with her husband) and others. Note: This article is about a musician. ... A collection of various CD singles In music, a single is a short recording of one or more separate tracks. ... Bold text For popular forms of music in general, see Popular music. ... Don (born February 1, 1937 in Brownie, a small coal-mining town (now defunct) near Central City, Muhlenberg County, Kentucky) and Phil Everly (born January 18, 1939 in Chicago, Illinois) are country-influenced rock and roll performers who had their greatest success in the 1950s. ... Roy Kelton Orbison (April 23, 1936 – December 6, 1988), nicknamed The Big O, was an influential American singer-songwriter, guitarist and a pioneer of rock and roll whose recording career spanned more than four decades. ... Charles Hardin Holley (September 7, 1936 – February 3, 1959),[1] better known as Buddy Holly, was an American singer, songwriter, and a pioneer of rock and roll. ... For other persons named Tony Bennett, see Tony Bennett (disambiguation). ... Sonny James (born James Loden on May 1, 1929 in Hackleburg, Alabama) is an American country music singer and songwriter. ... Eddy Arnold (May 15, 1918) is an American country music singer. ... Charley Frank Pride (born March 18, 1938) is a country music artist. ... Nazareth is a Scottish rock band that had several hard rock hits, as well as scoring with the Felice and Boudleaux Bryant penned ballad, Love Hurts, in the middle of the 1970s. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Leo Sayer (born Gerard Hugh Sayer on 21 May 1948 in Shoreham-by-Sea, Sussex) is an English performing artist, now based in Australia, whose singing career has spanned four decades. ... The duo of Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel are American popular musicians known collectively as Simon and Garfunkel. ... Sarah Lois Vaughan (nicknamed Sassy and The Divine One) (March 27, 1924, Newark, New Jersey – April 3, 1990, Los Angeles, California) was an American jazz singer, described as one of the greatest singers of the 20th century [1]. // Sarah Vaughans father, Asbury Jake Vaughan, was a carpenter and amateur... This article is about the band. ... Elvis Costello (born Declan Patrick McManus August 25, 1954) is an English musician, singer, and songwriter. ... William Count Basie (August 21, 1904 – April 26, 1984) was an American jazz pianist, organist, bandleader, and composer. ... Dean Martin (born Dino Paul Crocetti, June 7, 1917 – December 25, 1995) was an Italian American singer, film actor, and comedian. ... For the composer and conductor of the Ray Charles Singers, see Ray Charles (composer). ... This article is about the recording artist. ...


The Bryants eventually moved to a home not far from Nashville on Old Hickory Lake in Hendersonville, Tennessee near friends Roy Orbison and Johnny Cash. In 1978, they moved to Gatlinburg, Tennessee where they purchased the "Rocky Top Village Inn" in the Great Smoky Mountains. In 1979 they released their own album called A Touch of Bryant. "Rocky Top", one of their more than 1,500 recorded songs, was adopted as a State song of Tennessee in 1982 and the unofficial fight song for the University of Tennessee sports teams. The Old Hickory Lock and Dam forms Old Hickory Lake. ... Hendersonville is a large town in Sumner County, Tennessee, USA, on Old Hickory Lake. ... For the song of the same name, recorded by Tracy Byrd and later by Jason Aldean, see Johnny Cash (song). ... Gatlinburg is a city in Sevier County, Tennessee, with a total population of 3,828, as of the 2000 U.S. census. ... A rainy day in the Great Smoky Mountains, Western North Carolina Appalachian Mountain system The Great Smoky Mountains are a major mountain range in the southern part of the Appalachian Mountains, the second ridge line forming a north-south running mountain chain from the Eastern United States and bordering the... Rocky Top is an official state song of the state of Tennessee, as well as a popular fight song for the University of Tennessee Volunteers. ... Each state in the United States (except New Jersey) has a state song, selected by the state legislature as a symbol of the state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... The University of Tennessee (UT), sometimes called the University of Tennessee at Knoxville (UT Knoxville or UTK), is the flagship institution of the statewide land-grant University of Tennessee public university system in the American state of Tennessee. ...


During their distinguished career, Felice and Boudleaux Bryant earned a total of 59 BMI Country, Pop, and R&B music awards. In 1972 they were inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame, in 1986 into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1991, the Country Music Hall of Fame and the Rockabilly Hall of Fame. Broadcast Music Incorporated (BMI) is a collecting society that protects composers intellectual property in the communications business, especially radio. ... Rhythm and blues (or R & B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. ... The Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame was established by the Nashville Songwriters Foundation, Inc. ... The Songwriters Hall of Fame is an arm of the National Academy of Popular Music. ... This official history of the Country Music Hall of Fame skirts the scandals well-documented by veteran Music Row historian Stacy Harris. ... The Rockabilly Hall of Fame was established on March 21, 1997 to present early rock and roll history and information relative to the artists and personalities involved in this pioneering American music genre. ...


Deaths

Boudleaux Bryant died in 1987. Felice Bryant remained active writing songs and in 1991 the Nashville Arts Foundation honored her with their "Living Legend Award." She died in 2003. They are interred together in the Woodlawn Memorial Park Cemetery in Nashville. Woodlawn Memorial Park Cemetery is located at 660 Thompson Lane in Nashville, Tennessee. ...


One artist not mentioned as a voice of Felice Bryant; Bob Dylan (Self Portrait has one of her tracks and one co-write with her husband.)


Selected list of songs

Little Jimmy Dickens

  • 1948 "Country Boy"

Everly Brothers

  • "Bye Bye, Love"
  • "Wake Up, Little Susie"
  • "All I Have To Do Is Dream"
  • "Bird Dog"
  • "Devoted to You"
  • "Problems"
  • "Poor Jenny"
  • "Take A Message To Mary"
  • "Like Strangers"
  • "Always It's You"
  • "Love Of My Life"
  • "Love Hurts"

NOTE: These songs all scored high on Billboard's 'Hot 100' Pop, C&W, and R&B lists. "Wake Up, Little Susie" and "All I Have To Do Is Dream" both charted at #1 in all three categories. [1]


Buddy Holly

  • "Raining In My Heart"

Gram Parsons

  • "Love Hurts"
  • "Sleepless Nights"
  • "Brand New Heartache"

Other artists

Emmylou Harris (b. ... This article is about Cher, the entertainer. ... Roy Kelton Orbison (April 23, 1936 – December 6, 1988), nicknamed The Big O, was an influential American singer-songwriter, guitarist and a pioneer of rock and roll whose recording career spanned more than four decades. ... Johnny Logan can refer to a number of different people. ... Nazareth is a Scottish rock band that had several hard rock hits, as well as scoring with the Felice and Boudleaux Bryant penned ballad, Love Hurts, in the middle of the 1970s. ... Keith Richards (born 18 December 1943) is an English guitarist, songwriter, singer and a founding member of The Rolling Stones in 1962. ... Norah Jones (born Geethali Norah Jones Shankar on March 30, 1979 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American singer-songwriter, musician and occasional actress. ...

References

  1. ^ BPI Communications and Joel Whitburn's Record Research Publications
  • Kingsbury, Paul. (1998). "Felice and Boudleaux Bryant". In The Encyclopedia of Country Music. Paul Kingsbury, Editor. pp. 63-64.

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Felice & Boudleaux Bryant (1388 words)
Felice Bryant was born at St. Mary's Hospital and raised on the east side on Humboldt Avenue.
"Boudleaux was working in the cocktail lounge at the Schroeder and he was on the wagon, so he'd have to walk over to the water fountain by the elevator," she recalls.
In 1958, the Bryants gave the Everly Brothers the hit that was to be the signature song of their careers.
[Exotica] obit Felice Bryant (450 words)
Bryant, who collaborated with her husband, Boudleaux Bryant, on some of the most popular songs in rock 'n' roll and country music, died at her home in Gatlinburg, Tennessee.
Felice Bryant was born Matilda Genevieve Scaduto on Aug. 7, 1925, in Milwaukee.
Felice Bryant usually collaborated with her husband, but earned a huge hit on her own with "We Could," which was recorded by Dickens, Jim Reeves, George Jones and Tammy Wynette, Kitty Wells, George Morgan, the Louvin Brothers, Charley Pride, Al Martino and John Prine.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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