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Encyclopedia > Federalist Society
The Federalist Society logo, depicting James Madison's silhouette

The Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy Studies, most frequently called simply the Federalist Society, began at Yale Law School, Harvard Law School, and the University of Chicago Law School in 1982 as a student organization that challenged the perceived orthodox American liberal ideology found in most law schools. The Federalist Society states that it is founded on the principles that "the state exists to preserve freedom," that "the separation of governmental powers is central to our Constitution," and that the duty of the judicial branch is "to say what the law is, not what the law should be."[1] Image File history File links Fedsoc_logo. ... Image File history File links Fedsoc_logo. ... James Madison (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836), an American politician and fourth President of the United States of America (1809–1817), was one of the most influential Founders of the United States. ... A silhouette is a view of an object or scene consisting of the outline and a featureless interior. ... The Sterling Law Building Sculptural ornamentation on the Sterling Law Building Yale Law School, or YLS, is the law school of Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. ... Harvard Law School, often referred to in shorthand as Harvard Law or HLS, is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University. ... The University of Chicago Law School, having recently celebrated its centennial in the 2002-2003 school year, has established itself as a high profile part of the University of Chicago. ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... American liberalism—that is, liberalism in the United States of America—is a broad political and philosophical mindset, favoring individual liberty, and opposing restrictions on liberty, whether they come from established religion, from government regulation, from the existing class structure, or from multi-national corporations. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


The Society currently has chapters at approximately 180 United States law schools, including all of those U.S. News & World Report ranks among the top 20.[2] The Society also boasts a membership of over 20,000 practicing attorneys (organized as "alumni chapters" within the Society's "Lawyers Division") in sixty cities.[3] The Federalist Society also serves as a parent organization for conservatives and libertarians who are interested in the current state of the legal order. Its headquarters are in Washington, D.C. U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... This article deals with conservatism as a political philosophy. ... See also Libertarianism and Libertarian Party Libertarian,is a term for person who has made a conscious and principled commitment, evidenced by a statement or Pledge, to forswear violating others rights and usually living in voluntary communities: thus in law no longer subject to government supervision. ... Nickname: Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - City Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2: Jack...

Contents

Background

The Society’s name is a reference to the Federalist Papers. These were published as a series of articles intended to explain the new Constitution to the residents of New York state and persuade them to ratify it. A compilation of the Papers, called The Federalist, was published in 1788. The articles were secretly written under the pseudonym "Publius" by James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, and John Jay. Hamilton wrote 51 of the Federalist papers, Jay five, and Madison 29. An advertisement for The Federalist The Federalist Papers are a series of 85 articles arguing for the ratification of the United States Constitution. ... NY redirects here. ... Ratification includes the process of adopting an international treaty by the legislature, a constitution, or another nationally binding document (such as an amendment to a constitution) by the agreement of multiple sub-national entities. ... James Madison (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836), an American politician and fourth President of the United States of America (1809–1817), was one of the most influential Founders of the United States. ... Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757–July 12, 1804) was an Army officer, lawyer, Founding Father, American politician, leading statesman, financier and political theorist. ... John Jay (December 12, 1745 – May 17, 1829) was an American politician, statesman, revolutionary, diplomat, writer, and a jurist. ...


The Society also looks to Federalist Paper Number 78 for an articulation of the virtue of judicial restraint, as written by Alexander Hamilton: "It can be of no weight to say that the courts, on the pretense of a repugnancy, may substitute their own pleasure to the constitutional intentions of the legislature.... The courts must declare the sense of the law; and if they should be disposed to exercise WILL instead of JUDGMENT, the consequence would equally be the substitution of their pleasure to that of the legislative body." An advertisement for The Federalist The Federalist Papers are a series of 85 articles arguing for the ratification of the United States Constitution. ... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ...


Due to the strong influence of Madison on the Society’s philosophy, the Federalist Society considers Madison to be its patriarch—hence the use of Madison’s silhouette in the Society’s official logo. Madison is generally credited as the father of the Constitution and became the fourth President of the United States. This article is about the office in the United States. ...


Funding

The Federalist Society is funded by its modest members dues and other grants. It has received over $12 million in grants from conservative foundations, such as the Earhart, Bradley, Simon, and Olin foundations, as well as the Carthage, Koch, and Scaife Foundations.[4] The Earhart Foundation is a foundation that funds research and scholarship. ... The Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation, based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, is a large and influential foundation with about half a billion US dollars in assets. ... William Edward Simon (November 27, 1927–June 3, 2000) became the 63rd Secretary of the Treasury on May 8, 1974, during the Nixon administration. ... John M. Olin Foundation was a grant-making foundation established in 1953 by John M. Olin, president of the Olin Industries chemical and munitions manufacturing businesses. ... The Carthage Foundation is one of the American Scaife Foundations. ... Charles de Ganahl Koch (born November 1, 1935) is chairman of the board and chief executive officer of Koch Industries, Inc. ... Richard Mellon Scaife Richard Mellon Scaife (born July 3, 1932) is an American billionaire philanthropist and owner–publisher of the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. ...


Aims and membership

The Society seeks to promote the ideology set forth in its "Statement of Principles" through its activities. In working to achieve these goals, the Society has created a network of intellectuals that extends to all levels of the legal community. The Student Division has more than 5,000 law students as members and, through the national office's network of legal experts, the Society provides speakers for differing viewpoints at law school events. The activities of the Student Division are complemented by the activities of the Lawyers Division, which comprises more than 20,000 legal professionals, and the Faculty Division, which includes many in the academic legal community. Political Ideologies Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      An ideology is an organized collection of ideas. ... An intellectual is one who tries to use his or her intellect to work, study, reflect, speculate on, or ask and answer questions with regard to a variety of different ideas. ...


Under United States Code, the Federalist Society is legally organized as a tax-exempt nonprofit organization and is expressly forbidden[5] to engage in "political and lobbying activities."[6]. The United States Code (U.S.C.) is a compilation and codification of the general and permanent federal law of the United States. ... A tax exemption is an exemption to the tax law of a state or nation in which part of the taxes that would normally be collected from an individual or an organization are instead forgone. ... A non-profit organization (often called non-profit org or simply non-profit or not-for-profit) can be seen as an organization that doesnt have a goal to make a profit. ...


Members of the society have debated the abolition of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, limiting the power of the Environmental Protection Agency and other agencies, limiting the reach of gender equity laws (Title IX) and voting rights laws, and expanded powers of war-time presidents. The organization also hosts panels discussing recent Supreme Court decisions, the constitutionality of school vouchers, and the scope of the commerce clause.[7] The Federalist Society does not officially lobby and does not litigate cases. The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, commonly referred to as the SEC, is the United States governing body which has primary responsibility for overseeing the regulation of the securities industry. ... EPA redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) is the highest judicial body in the... An education voucher, commonly called a school voucher, is a certificate by which parents are given the ability to pay for the education of their children at a school of their choice, rather than the public school to which they were assigned. ... Article I, Section 8, Clause 3 of the United States Constitution, known as the Commerce Clause, empowers the United States Congress To regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States, and with the Indian Tribes. ...


The Federalist Society is an organization that seeks to debate constitutional issues and public policy questions, a commitment which extends to inviting speakers who do not agree with the society's principles; past invitees include Justice Stephen Breyer and law professor Alan Dershowitz, as trenchant opponents of the Federalist Society's goals as could be imagined. UCLA law professor Eugene Volokh explains this openness to dissenting voices by saying that "we think that a fair debate between us and our liberal adversaries will win more converts for our positions than for the other side’s."[8] Stephen Gerald Breyer (born August 15, 1938) is an American attorney, political figure, and jurist. ... Alan Morton Dershowitz (born September 1, 1938) is a Jewish-American political figure and criminal law professor at Harvard Law School, known for his extensive published works, support for Zionism and Israel and work as an attorney in several high-profile law cases. ... Eugene Volokh Eugene Volokh (born February 29, 1968) is an American legal commentator and law professor at the UCLA School of Law (located on the campus of the University of California, Los Angeles). ...


"Dedicated to reforming the current legal order," the Federalist Society hopes to transform the American legal system by developing and promoting conservative positions and influencing who will become judges, top government officials, and decision-makers.[9] The Federalist Society’s guide to forming and running a chapter of the society claims that the organization “creates an informal network of people with shared views which can provide assistance in job placement.”[10]


Federalist Society members helped to encourage President Bush’s decision to terminate the American Bar Association’s nearly half-century-old monopoly on rating judicial nominees' qualifications for office. Since the Eisenhower administration, the American Bar Association has provided the service to presidents of both parties and the nation by vetting the qualifications of those under consideration for lifetime appointment to the federal judiciary. The process has been accused by some (including the Federalist Society) of having a liberal bias.[1][2][3] For example, the ABA gave Ronald Reagan's judicial nominees Richard Posner and Frank H. Easterbrook low "qualified/not qualified" ratings; later, the ABA gave Bill Clinton judicial nominees with similar resumes "well qualified" ratings.[11] Meanwhile, Judges Posner and Easterbrook have gone on to become the two most highly-cited judges in the federal appellate judiciary.[4] American liberalism—that is, liberalism in the United States of America—is a broad political and philosophical mindset, favoring individual liberty, and opposing restrictions on liberty, whether they come from established religion, from government regulation, from the existing class structure, or from multi-national corporations. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981 – 1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967 – 1975). ... Richard A. Posner Richard Allen Posner (born January 11, 1939 in New York City) is currently a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit. ... Frank Hoover Easterbrook (born 1948) is Chief Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ...


Members

The Society has many prominent conservative members, including United States Supreme Court Justices Antonin Scalia (who served as the original faculty advisor to the organization), Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas, former United States Circuit Court Judge Robert Bork, former United States Attorney General Edwin Meese, former United States Solicitor General Ted Olson, Senator Orrin Hatch, former United States Solicitor General Kenneth Starr and Congressman Dan Lungren. Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) is the highest judicial body in the... Antonin Gregory Scalia (born March 11, 1936[1]) is an American jurist and the second most senior Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. ... Samuel Anthony Alito, Jr. ... Clarence Thomas (born June 23, 1948) is an American jurist and has been an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States since 1991. ... The United States courts of appeals (or circuit courts) are the mid-level appellate courts of the United States federal court system. ... Robert Bork Robert Heron Bork (born March 1, 1927 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) is a conservative American legal scholar who advocates the judicial philosophy of originalism. ... Seal of the United States Department of Justice The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice (see 28 U.S.C. Â§ 503) concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... Edwin Meese III Edwin Ed Meese III (born December 2, 1931 in Oakland, California) served as the seventy-fifth Attorney General of the United States (1985-1988). ... The United States Solicitor General is the individual appointed to argue for the Government of the United States in front of the Supreme Court of the United States, when the government is party to a case. ... Theodore Bevry Olson (born September 11, 1940) was the 42nd United States Solicitor General, serving from June 2001 to July 2004. ... Orrin Grant Hatch (born March 22, 1934) is a Republican United States Senator from Utah, serving since 1977. ... The United States Solicitor General is the individual appointed to argue for the Government of the United States in front of the Supreme Court of the United States, when the government is party to a case. ... Kenneth Winston Starr Kenneth Winston Starr (born July 21, 1946) is an American lawyer and former judge who was appointed to the Office of the Independent Counsel to investigate the death of the deputy White House counsel Vince Foster and the Whitewater land transactions by President Bill Clinton. ... Dan Lungren Daniel Edward Lungren (born September 22, 1946), a Republican from California, was elected to the United States House of Representatives in 2004, representing the states 3rd Congressional district (map). ...


The Society also has many prominent libertarians who are members and frequent speakers at Society events, such as Professor Richard Epstein of the University of Chicago Law School; Professor Randy Barnett of Georgetown University Law Center; Bradley Smith, a professor at Capital University Law School who formerly served as Chairman of the Federal Election Commission; and Roger Pilon, Director of Constitutional Studies at the Cato Institute. See also Libertarianism and Libertarian Party Libertarian,is a term for person who has made a conscious and principled commitment, evidenced by a statement or Pledge, to forswear violating others rights and usually living in voluntary communities: thus in law no longer subject to government supervision. ... Richard Epstein Richard A. Epstein, born in 1943, is currently the James Parker Hall Distinguished Service Professor of Law at the University of Chicago Law School. ... The University of Chicago Law School, having recently celebrated its centennial in the 2002-2003 school year, has established itself as a high profile part of the University of Chicago. ... Randy Barnett Randy E. Barnett (born February 5, 1952) is a lawyer, a law professor at Georgetown University Law Center, and a legal theorist in the United States. ... The schools original sign, preserved on the north quad of the present-day campus. ... Willmcw 17:12, July 20, 2005 (UTC) Categories: Possible copyright violations ... The Cato Institute is a libertarian think tank headquartered in Washington, D.C. The Institutes stated mission is to broaden the parameters of public policy debate to allow consideration of the traditional American principles of limited government, individual liberty, free markets, and peace by seeking greater involvement of the...


Other members include Secretary of Homeland Security Michael Chertoff, United States Ambassador to the European Union C. Boyden Gray, and Columbia Law School Dean David Schizer. The United States Secretary of Homeland Security is the head of the United States Department of Homeland Security, the body concerned with protecting the American homeland and the safety of American citizens. ... Michael Chertoff (born November 28, 1953) is the current United States Secretary of Homeland Security. ... This is a list of United States ambassadors to the European Union. ... Clayland Boyden Gray is a partner with the law firm Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr. ... Columbia Law School, located in the New York City borough of Manhattan, is one of the professional schools of Columbia University, a member of the Ivy League, and one of the leading law schools in the United States. ... David Schizer (born c1969) was named the fourteenth dean of Columbia Law School at Columbia University in 2004. ...


Chief Justice of the United States John Roberts was reported to be a member of the Federalist Society during the 2005 confirmation process, but Roberts's membership status was never definitively established. Deputy White House press secretary Dana Perino said, "He [Roberts] has no recollection of ever being a member." [12]. The Washington Post later located the Federalist Society Lawyers' Division Leadership Directory, 1997-1998, which listed Roberts as a member of the Washington chapter steering committee.[13] Membership in the Society is not a necessary condition for being listed in the "leadership directory."[14] Like other private organizations, including the NAACP and the National Rifle Association, the Federalist Society does not publish a membership list or otherwise disclose the identity of its members, preferring instead to let members publicly identify themselves with the Society if they so choose. Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch of... John Glover Roberts Jr. ... The White House Press Secretary is a senior White House official with a rank one step below Presidential Cabinet level. ... Dana Marie Perino (born May 9, 1972) is the deputy White House Press Secretary, and director of communications for the press team. ... ...


The Bush administration has appointed a number of Society members nominated to federal District and Appeals courts.[15]


See also

Wikisource has original text related to this article: Constitution of the United States of America Page one of the original copy of the Constitution. ...

External links

August 1 is the 213th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (214th in leap years), with 152 days remaining. ... July 29 is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... July 18 is the 199th day (200th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 166 days remaining. ...

References

  1. ^ Batkins, Sam (2004-08-12). ABA Retains Little Objectivity in Nomination Process. Center for Individual Freedom. Retrieved on 2006-08-20.
  2. ^ Lindgren, James. "Yes, the ABA Rankings Are Biased", Wall Street Journal, 2001-08-06. Retrieved on 2006-08-21. 
  3. ^ ABA Ratings of Judicial Nominees. ABA Watch. Federalist Society (1996-07). Retrieved on 2006-08-20.
  4. ^ Choi, Stephen; Gulati, Mitu (2003). "Who Would Win a Tournament of Judges (Draft)". Boalt Working Papers in Public Law (19): 96. Retrieved on 2006-08-20. 

shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 12 is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... August 20 is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Wall Street Journal is an influential international daily newspaper published in New York City, New York with an average daily circulation of 1,800,607 (2002). ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 6 is the 218th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (219th in leap years), with 147 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... August 21 is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... August 20 is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... August 20 is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • Official website
  • Harvard Law Federalist Society
  • University of Chicago Federalist Society
  • Wayne State Federalist Society
  • Yale Law Federalist Society
  • Georgetown Law Federalist Society
  • Columbia Law Federalist Society
  • Stanford Law Federalist Society
  • 26th Annual Student Symposium Homepage, hosted by Northwestern University School of Law
  • 25th Annual Student Symposium Homepage, hosted by Columbia Law School

  Results from FactBites:
 
Federalist Society: Information from Answers.com (870 words)
The Federalist Society also serves as a parent organization for conservatives and libertarians who are interested in the current state of the legal order, though there is no official "litmus test" for membership [2].
The Society’s name is a reference to the principle of Federalism, as stated in Federalist Paper Number 78: "It can be of no weight to say that the courts, on the pretense of a repugnancy, may substitute their own pleasure to the constitutional intentions of the legislature....
The Federalist Society is an organization that seeks to debate constitutional issues and public policy questions, a commitment which extends to inviting speakers who do not agree with the society's principles; past invitees include Justice Stephen Breyer and law professor Alan Dershowitz, as trenchant opponents of the Federalist Society's goals as could be imagined.
Federalist Society - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1466 words)
The Federalist Society states that it is founded on the principles that "the state exists to preserve freedom," that "the separation of governmental powers is central to our Constitution," and that the duty of the judicial branch is "to say what the law is, not what the law should be."[1]
Due to the strong influence of James Madison on the Society’s philosophy, the Federalist Society considers Madison to be their patriarch—hence the use of Madison’s silhouette in the Society’s official logo.
Under United States Code, the Federalist Society is legally organized as a tax-exempt nonprofit organization and is expressly forbidden[5] to engage in "political and lobbying activities"[6].
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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