FACTOID # 14: North Carolina has a larger Native American population than North Dakota, South Dakota and Montana combined.
 
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Encyclopedia > Federalist

The term "federalist" refers to several sets of political beliefs around the world. It usually has reference to the concept of federalism or the type of government called a federation. Sometimes it refers to an advocate of a type of government more properly called a confederation. At the core, political federalism is a political philosophy in which a group or body of members are bound together (Latin: foedus, covenant) with a governing representative head. ... A map displaying todays federations. ... A confederation is an association of sovereign states or communities, usually created by treaty but often later adopting a common constitution. ...

World map showing the location of Europe. ... An autonomous (subnational) entity is a subnational entity that has a certain amount of autonomy. ... Centralization is the process by which the activities of an organization, particularly those regarding decision-making, become concentrated within a particular location and/or group. ... Supranationalism is a method of decision-making in international organizations, wherein power is held by independent appointed officials or by representatives elected by the legislatures or people of the member states. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... In Quebec, federalists, in regards to the future of the Quebec people, defend the concept of Quebec remaining within Canada, as opposed to Quebec sovereigntists, proponents of Quebec independence (most often, but not for all followers, along with an economic union with Canada similar to the European Union). ... In Canadian English, a Québécois (IPA: ), or in the feminine Québécoise (IPA: ), is a francophone native or resident of the province of Quebec, Canada. ... In Quebec, the National Question (in French la Question nationale) is an expression referring to the reflexion over the status and autonomy of the Quebec State. ... Status Quo are an English rock band whose music is characterised by a strong boogie line. ... Distinct society (in French la société distincte) was a political neologism used during a constitutional debate in Canada, in the second half of the 1980s and in the early 1990s. ... The Quebec sovereignty movement is a political movement aimed at attaining independent statehood (sovereignty) for the Canadian province of Quebec. ... In the United States, Federalism is a label applied to at least three distinct political movements: During the 1780s, Federalism was a movement whose governing philosophy was that national government under the Articles of Confederation was too weak. ... Page I of the Constitution of the United States of America Page II of the United States Constitution Page III of the United States Constitution Page IV of the United States Constitution The Syng inkstand, with which the Constitution was signed The Constitution of the United States is the supreme... Year 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... An advertisement for The Federalist The Federalist Papers are a series of 85 articles arguing for the ratification of the United States Constitution. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732–December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and was later elected the first President of the United States. ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... John Adams (October 30, 1735 – July 4, 1826) was a politician and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States of America. ... 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... The Federalist Party was an American political party during the First Party System, in the period 1793 to 1816, with remnants lasting into the 1820s. ... Nixon redirects here. ... The New federalism is a policy theme which became popular in the 1980s and 1990s in the United States that refers to the transfer of certain powers from the federal government to the states. ... At the core, political federalism is a political philosophy in which a group or body of members are bound together (Latin: foedus, covenant) with a governing representative head. ... Same-sex marriage is a term for a legally, socially and/or religiously recognized marriage in which two people of the same sex live together as a family. ... For the program to kill people with disabilities in Nazi Germany, see Action T4. ... Cannabis sativa extract. ... The term gun politics refers to the various public policy debates surrounding the freedom or restriction (gun rights versus gun control) of private ownership and usage of firearms, and to what extent such policy influences crime, capacity for self-defense, and the balance of power between the individual and the... Property designates those things that are commonly recognized as being the possessions of a person or group. ... The Federalist Society logo, depicting James Madisons silhouette The Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy Studies, most frequently called simply the Federalist Society, began at Yale Law School, Harvard Law School, and the University of Chicago Law School in 1982 as a student organization that challenged the perceived... It has been suggested that World Federation be merged into this article or section. ...

See also

At the core, political federalism is a political philosophy in which a group or body of members are bound together (Latin: foedus, covenant) with a governing representative head. ... Anti-Federalism was the name given to two distinct counter-movements in the late 18th Century American politics: The first Anti-Federalist movement formed in reaction to the Federalist movement of the 1780s. ... A map displaying todays federations. ... A confederation is an association of sovereign states or communities, usually created by treaty but often later adopting a common constitution. ... World federation is the act of politically, economically, militarily, and/or culturally joining all of the worlds nations into one superstate. ...

External links

  • World Federalist Movement

  Results from FactBites:
 
Federalist Party - LoveToKnow 1911 (466 words)
FEDERALIST PARTY, in American politics, the party that organized the national government of the United States under the constitution of 1787.
The Federalist Party, which may be regarded as definitely organized practically from 1791, was led, leaving Washington aside, by Alexander Hamilton and John Adams.
The Federalists were charged by the Republicans with being aristocrats and monarchists, and it is certain that their leaders 1 Even the Democratic party has generally been liberal; although less so in theory (hardly less so in practice) than its opponents.
"The Federalist Society" by Jerry Landay (2961 words)
It is the annual lawyers¹ meeting of the Federalist Society--a conservative legal fellowship to which Starr belongs--and he is in his element.
The Federalists were (and remain) "originalist" in their approach to the Constitution--meaning that they favored strict textual readings that tended to shear back constitutional principles developed during the more liberal Warren Court era.
The Federalist Society¹s student founders acquired conservative polish from the leading politicos of the Reagan and Bush eras, and have gone on to become political powers in their own right.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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