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Encyclopedia > Federal Reserve note
Various Federal Reserve Notes - Observe that they are missing serial number imprints
Various Federal Reserve Notes - Observe that they are missing serial number imprints

A Federal Reserve Note (FRNs or ferns, not to be confused with "Federal Reserve Bank Note") is a type of banknote issued by the Federal Reserve System and is the main type of paper currency in the United States. It is the only type of American banknotes that still circulates today. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links Gnome_globe_current_event. ... FRN is a TLA that may refer to: Federal Republic of Nigeria Fearn railway station (UK station code: FRN) Federal Reserve Note Floating rate note Forum pour la Redressement National, see Politics of Comoros French language, (SIL code: FRN) Friendlys, (AMEX ticker symbol: FRN) Fucking Rail Nut, a derogatory... money File links The following pages link to this file: United States dollar Federal Reserve note Wikipedia:Selected anniversaries/July Wikipedia:Selected anniversaries/July 6 Wikipedia:Selected anniversaries/All Massachusetts ... money File links The following pages link to this file: United States dollar Federal Reserve note Wikipedia:Selected anniversaries/July Wikipedia:Selected anniversaries/July 6 Wikipedia:Selected anniversaries/All Massachusetts ... Federal Reserve bank notes were United States currency issued by individual Federal Reserve banks. ... A £20 Bank of England banknote. ... The Fed redirects here. ...


Federal Reserve Notes are fiat currency, with the words "this note is legal tender for all debts, public and private" printed on each bill. (See generally 31 U.S.C. § 5103.) They are issued by the Federal Reserve Banks and have replaced United States Notes, which were once issued by the Treasury Department. Look up fiat in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Legal tender or forced tender is payment that cannot be refused in settlement of a debt denominated in the same currency by virtue of law. ... Title 31 of the United States Code outlines the role of the money and finance in the United States Code. ... Federal Reserve Districts The United States Federal Reserve System consists of twelve Federal Reserve Banks, each responsible for a particular district, and some with branches. ... 1880 United States Notes A United States Note is a fiat paper currency that was issued directly into circulation by the United States Department of the Treasury. ... The U.S. Treasury building today. ...


The paper that Federal Reserve Notes are printed on is made by the Crane Paper Company of Dalton, Massachusetts. Crane Paper Company, based in Dalton, Massachusetts, makes rag based paper for the Federal Reserve Note. ... Dalton is a town in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, United States. ...

Contents

History

The first institution with responsibilities of a central bank in the U.S. was the First Bank of the United States, chartered in 1791 by Alexander Hamilton. Its charter was not renewed in 1811. In 1816, the Second Bank of the United States was chartered; its charter was not renewed in 1836, after it became the object of a major attack by president Andrew Jackson. From 1837 to 1862, in the Free Banking Era there was no formal central bank. From 1862 to 1913, a system of national banks was instituted by the 1863 National Banking Act. A series of bank panics, in 1873, 1893, and 1907 provided strong demand for the creation of a centralized banking system. The first printed notes were Series 1914. The First Bank of the United States was a bank chartered by the United States Congress on February 25, 1791. ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757 - July 12, 1804) was an Army officer, lawyer, Founding Father, American politician, leading statesman, financier and political theorist. ... For the US Federal Agent designation, see Special agent. ... Year 1816 (MDCCCXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Second Bank of the United States was a bank chartered in 1816, five years after the expiration of the First Bank of the United States. ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The National Bank Act (ch. ...


Value

The authority of the Federal Reserve Banks to issue notes comes from the Federal Reserve Act of 1913. Legally, they are liabilities of the Federal Reserve Banks and obligations of the United States government. Although not issued by the Treasury Department, Federal Reserve Notes carry the (engraved) signature of the Treasurer of the United States and the United States Secretary of the Treasury. The Federal Reserve Act (ch. ... The Treasurer of the United States is the only position within the United States Department of the Treasury older than the Department itself. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ...


Federal Reserve Notes are fiat currency, which means that the government is not obligated to give the holder of a note gold, silver, or any specific tangible property in exchange for the note. Before 1971, the notes were "backed" by gold—i.e., the law provided that holders of Federal Reserve notes could exchange them on demand for a fixed amount of gold (though from 1934–1971 only foreign holders of the notes could exchange the notes on demand).[1] Since 1971, federal reserve notes have not been backed by any specific asset. While 12 U.S.C. § 411 states that "Federal Reserve Notes . . . shall be redeemed in lawful money on demand" this means only that Federal Reserve banks will exchange the notes on demand for new Federal Reserve notes. Thus today the notes are backed only by the "full faith and credit of the U.S. government"—the government's ability to levy taxes to pay its debts. In another sense, because the notes are legal tender, they are "backed" by all the goods and services in the economy; they have value because the public accepts them in exchange for valued goods and services. Intrinsically they are worth the value of their ink and paper components. Look up fiat in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... This article is about the chemical element. ... Commodity money is money whose value comes from a commodity out of which it is made. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ... Title 12 of the United States Code outlines the role of Banks and Banking in the United States Code. ... ... “Taxes” redirects here. ... The U.S. public debt, commonly called the national debt or the gross federal debt, is the amount of money owed by the United States federal government. ... In general, the economic value of something is how much a product or service is worth to someone relative to other things (often measured in money). ...


Production and distribution

Federal Reserve Notes are printed by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP), a bureau of the Department of the Treasury.[2] The Federal Reserve Banks pay the BEP only the cost of printing the notes (about 4¢ a note), but to circulate the note as new currency rather than merely replacing worn notes, they must pledge collateral for the face value, primarily in Federal securities. the bomb. ... Treasury securities are government bonds issued by the United States Department of the Treasury through the Bureau of the Public Debt. ...


Federal Reserve notes, on average, remain in circulation for the following periods of time:[3]

$1 21 months
$5 16 months
$10 18 months
$20 24 months
$50 55 months
$100 89 months

The Federal Reserve does not publish an average life span for the $2 bill. This is likely due to the fact that it is treated as a collector's item by the general public, and therefore is not subjected to normal circulation.[4] Federal Reserve Districts The United States Federal Reserve System consists of twelve Federal Reserve Banks, each responsible for a particular district, and some with branches. ...


In contrast, the Fed pays the United States Mint—another Treasury bureau—face value for coins, as coins are direct obligations of the Treasury.[5] Seal of the U.S. Mint Denver United States mint building The United States Mint primarily produces circulating coinage for the United States to conduct its trade and commerce. ... This article is about monetary coins. ...


A commercial bank that maintains a reserve account with the Federal Reserve can obtain notes from the Federal Reserve Bank in its district whenever it wishes. The bank must pay for the notes in full, dollar for dollar, by debiting (drawing down) its reserve account. Smaller banks without a reserve account at the Federal Reserve can maintain their reserve accounts at larger "correspondent banks" which themselves maintain reserve accounts with the Federal Reserve.[5] This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Nicknames

U.S. paper currency has had many nicknames and slang terms, some of which ("sawbuck" and "double-sawbuck") are now obsolete. The notes themselves are generally referred to as bills (as in "five-dollar bill") and any combination of U.S. notes and coins as bucks (as in "fifty bucks"). Obverse of the $5 bill Reverse of the $5 bill The United States five-dollar bill ($5) is a denomination of United States currency. ...

See tables below for nicknames for individual denomination
  • Greenbacks, any amount in any denomination of Federal Reserve Note (from the green ink used on the back)
  • Dead presidents, any amount in any denomination of Federal Reserve Note (from the portrait of a U.S. president on most denominations)
  • One hundred dollar bills are sometimes called "Benjamins" (in reference to their portrait of Benjamin Franklin) or C-Notes (the letter "C" stands for the Roman Numeral 100).
  • One thousand dollars ($1000) can be referenced as "Large", "K", "Grand" or "Stack", and previously as a "G" (short for "grand").

Many more slang terms refer to money in general (fishes, buckaroo, bucks, bankroll, coin, moolah, cheddar, ducats, C.R.E.A.M., cabbage, dough, greenies, lettuce, smackers, simoleons, clams, big ones, bread, paper, yaper, cheese, cash, gouda, sheets, chips, scrilla, scratch, etc.). Benjamin Franklin (January 17 [O.S. January 6] 1706 – April 17, 1790) was one of the most well known Founding Fathers of the United States. ... The system of Roman numerals is a numeral system originating in ancient Rome, and was adapted from Etruscan numerals. ...


Criticisms

Security

Despite the relatively late addition of color and other anti-counterfeiting features to U.S. currency, critics hold that it is still a straightforward matter to counterfeit these bills. They point out that the ability to reproduce color images is well within the capabilities of modern color printers, most of which are affordable to many consumers. These critics suggest that the Federal Reserve should incorporate holographic features, as are used in most other major currencies, such as the pound sterling, Canadian dollar and euro banknotes, which are more difficult and expensive to forge. Another robust technology, the polymer banknote, has been developed for the Australian dollar and adopted for the New Zealand dollar, Romanian leu, Thai baht, Papua New Guinea kina and other circulating, as well as commemorative, banknotes of a number of other countries. Polymer banknotes are a deterrent to the counterfeiter, as they are much more difficult and time consuming to reproduce. They are more secure, cleaner and more durable than paper notes.[6] A counterfeit is an imitation that is made with the intent to deceptively represent its content or origins. ... A computer printer, or more commonly a printer, produces a hard copy (permanent human-readable text and/or graphics) of documents stored in electronic form, usually on physical print media such as paper or transparencies. ... This article is about the photographic technique. ... GBP redirects here. ... C$ redirects here. ... The euro (EUR or €) is the single currency for the European Union and currently 13 of its member states. ... The first Guardian polymer banknote in circulation. ... ISO 4217 Code AUD User(s) Australia, Kiribati, Nauru, Tuvalu, Christmas Island, Cocos (Keeling) Islands, and Norfolk Island Inflation 1. ... ISO 4217 Code NZD User(s) New Zealand, Cook Islands, Niue, Pitcairn Islands, Tokelau Inflation 2. ... For the Moldovan currency, see Moldovan leu. ... ISO 4217 Code THB User(s) Thailand Inflation 4. ... Kina (currency code PGK) is the currency of Papua New Guinea. ... The first Guardian polymer banknote in circulation. ...


However, U.S. currency may not be as vulnerable as it is said to be. Two of the most critical anti-counterfeiting features of U.S. currency are the paper and the ink. The exact composition of the paper is confidential, as is the formula for the ink. The ink and paper combine to create a distinct texture, particularly as the currency is circulated. The paper and the ink alone have no effect on the value of the dollar until post print. These characteristics can be hard to duplicate without the proper equipment and materials. U.S. notes, however, remain less secure than most other notes, and while a bank might be able to detect fine differences in paper and ink technology, counterfeit notes generally receive far less scrutiny at a point of sale.


The differing sizes of other nations' banknotes are a security feature that eliminates one form of counterfeiting to which U.S. currency is prone: Counterfeiters can simply bleach the ink off a low-denomination note, typically a single dollar, and reprint it as a higher-value note, such as a $100 bill. To counter this, the U.S. government has considered making lower-denomination notes slightly smaller than those of higher denomination. Current proposals suggest making the $1 and $5 bills an inch shorter in length and a half-inch shorter in height.[citation needed]


Differentiation

Critics also note that U.S. bills are often hard to tell apart: they use very similar designs, they are printed in the same colors (until the 2003 banknotes), and they are all the same size. Advocates for the blind have argued that American paper currency design should use increasing sizes according to value and/or raised or indented features to make the currency more usable by the vision-impaired, since the denominations cannot currently be distinguished from one another non-visually. Use of Braille codes on currency is not considered a desirable solution because (1) these markings would only be useful to people who know how to read braille, and (2) one braille symbol can become confused with another if even one bump is rubbed off. Though some blind individuals say that they have no problems keeping track of their currency because they fold their bills in different ways or keep them in different places in their wallets, they nevertheless must rely on sighted people or currency-reading machines to determine the value of each bill before filing it away using the system of their choice. This means that no matter how organized they are, blind Americans still have to trust sighted people or machines each time they receive change for their purchases or each time they receive cash from their customers. Nor does this help blind or partially sighted tourists. This article is about the visual condition. ... Braille code where the word (, French for first) can be read. ...


By contrast, other major currencies, such as the pound sterling and euro, feature notes of differing sizes: the size of the note increases with the denomination and are printed in different colors. This is useful not only for the vision-impaired; they nearly eliminate the risk that, for example, someone might fail to notice a high-value note among low-value ones, a common problem in the United States. Tourists also frequently encounter difficulties with U.S. money, as they are less familiar with the design cues that distinguish the various denominations. GBP redirects here. ... For other uses, see Euro (disambiguation). ... A tourist boat travels the River Seine in Paris, France Tourism can be defined as the act of travel for the purpose of recreation, and the provision of services for this act. ...


Although the redesigned banknotes are more varied, they still lack enough contrast (compared to the euro, for example) to be rapidly differentiated from each other. This slows the process of counting bills or searching for a specific value. Also, the risk of using a wrong value note still exists.[citation needed] The euro (EUR or €) is the single currency for the European Union and currently 13 of its member states. ...


Multiple currency sizes were considered for U.S. currency, but makers of vending machines and change machines successfully argued that implementing such a wide range of sizes would greatly increase the cost and complexity of such machines. Similar arguments were unsuccessfully made in Europe prior to the introduction of multiple note sizes. A typical U.S. snack vending machine A vending machine is a machine that provides various snacks, beverages and other products to consumers. ... A change machine is a device that accepts large denominations of currency and returns an equal amount of currency in smaller bills or coins. ...

Canadian banknotes incorporate a braille-like feature, allowing the blind to determine the value of the note.
Canadian banknotes incorporate a braille-like feature, allowing the blind to determine the value of the note.

Alongside the contrasting colors and increasing sizes, many other countries' currencies contain tactile features missing from U.S. banknotes to assist the blind. For example, Canadian banknotes have a series of raised dots (not Braille) in the upper right corner to indicate denomination. Mexican peso banknotes also have raised patterns of dashed lines. Image File history File links Canadian_Tactile_Bills. ... Image File history File links Canadian_Tactile_Bills. ... Current Canadian banknotes (the Canadian Journey series) have a tactile feature to indicate denomination in the upper right corner of the face side of the bill. ... Current Canadian banknotes (the Canadian Journey series) have a tactile feature to indicate denomination in the upper right corner of the face side of the bill. ... ISO 4217 Code MXN User(s) Mexico Inflation 3. ...


Suit by sightless over U.S. banknote design

On November 28, 2006, U.S. District Judge James Robertson ruled that the American bills gave an undue burden to the blind and denied them "meaningful access" to the U.S. currency system. is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Judge Robertson James Robertson (born 1938) is a judge for the United States District Court for the District of Columbia. ...


Ruling on a lawsuit filed in 2002 by the American Council of the Blind, Judge Robertson accepted the plaintiff's argument that current practice violates Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. (Ruling as PDF file) The Treasury is appealing the decision. The judge has ordered the Treasury Department to begin working on a redesign within 30 days.[7] The American Council of the Blind (ACB) is a nation wide organisation in the United States. ... Section 504 of the 1973 Rehabilitation Act or, more formally, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Pub. ... The U.S. Treasury building today. ...


The plaintiff's attorney was quoted as saying "It's just frankly unfair that blind people should have to rely on the good faith of people they have never met in knowing whether they've been given the correct change."


Government attorneys estimated that the cost of such a change ranges from $75 million in equipment upgrades and $9 million annual expenses for punching holes in bills to $178 million in one-time charges and $50 million annual expenses for printing bills of varying sizes.[8]


Series detail

Series overview
Large-size notes
Series $1 $2 $5 $10 $20 $50 $100 $500 $1000 $5000 $10 000 Obligation clause[9] Remarks
1914 v v v v v This note is receivable by all national and member banks and Federal Reserve Banks and for all taxes, customs and other public dues. It is redeemable in gold on demand at the Treasury Department of the United States in the city of Washington, District of Columbia or in gold or lawful money at any Federal Reserve Bank.
1918 v v v v
Small-size notes
Series $1 $2 $5 $10 $20 $50 $100 $500 $1000 $5000 $10 000 Obligation clause Remarks
1928 v v v v v v v v v Redeemable in gold on demand at the United States Treasury, or in gold or lawful money at any Federal Reserve Bank Branch ID in numerals
1934 This note is legal tender for all debts, public and private, and is redeemable in lawful money at the United States Treasury, or at any Federal Reserve Bank Branch ID in letters; after the Great Depression in 1929
1950 v v v v v Slight design changes: branch logo; placements of signatures, "Series xxxx", and "Washington, D.C.",
1963, 1969, 1974 v v v v v v This note is legal tender for all debts, public and private First FRN $1; "Will pay to the bearer on demand" removed; Seal in Latin replaced by seal in English in 1969[4]
1976 v First FRN $2, Bicentennial
1977, 1981, 1985, 1988 v v v v v v
1990 v v v v
1993 v v v v v v
1995 v v v v v
Large-portrait ($1 and $2 remain small-portrait)
Series $1 $2 $5 $10 $20 $50 $100 $500 $1000 $5000 $10 000 Obligation clause Remarks
1996 v v v This note is legal tender for all debts, public and private
1999, 2001 v v v v v v
2003 v v v v v
Color notes ($1 remains unchanged)
2004 v v v This note is legal tender for all debts, public and private
2006 v v v v v v

For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... The United States Bicentennial was celebrated on Sunday, July 4, 1976, the 200th anniversary of the adoption of the Declaration of Independence. ...

Series 1928–2003

Small size notes
Image Value Description Date of
Obverse Reverse Obverse Reverse first series last series
$1 George Washington Great Seal of the United States 1963 current
$2 Thomas Jefferson Trumbull's Declaration of Independence 1976 current
$5 Abraham Lincoln Lincoln Memorial 1928 1995
$10 Alexander Hamilton United States Department of Treasury Building
$20 Andrew Jackson White House
$50 Ulysses S. Grant United States Capitol 1993
[1] $100 Benjamin Franklin Independence Hall
$500 William McKinley Value 1934
$1000 Grover Cleveland
$5000 James Madison
$10 000 Salmon P. Chase
Large portrait
$5 As small-size, small-portrait notes 1999 2003
$10
$20 1996 2001
[2] [3] $50
$100 2003
These images are to scale at 0.7 pixels per millimeter, a Wikipedia standard for world banknotes. For table standards, see the banknote specification table.

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 365 pixelsFull resolution (7440 × 3392 pixel, file size: 17. ... Image File history File linksMetadata United_States_one_dollar_bill,_reverse. ... For the US one-dollar coin, see United States dollar coin. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Obverse The Great Seal of the United States is used to authenticate certain documents issued by the United States government. ... Image File history File linksMetadata US_$2_obverse. ... Image File history File linksMetadata US_$2_reverse. ... Face of the Series 1995 $2 bill Back of the Series 1995 $2 bill The United States two-dollar bill ($2) is a current denomination of U.S. currency. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence is an iconic 12- by 18-foot painting in the U.S. Capitol Rotunda depicting the presentation of the draft of the Declaration to Congress. ... Image File history File links 5_28abf. ... Obverse of the $5 bill Reverse of the $5 bill The United States five-dollar bill ($5) is a denomination of United States currency. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... The Lincoln Memorial, in Washington, D.C., is a United States Presidential memorial built to honor 16th President Abraham Lincoln. ... Obverse of the current $10 bill, which entered circulation March 2, 2006 Reverse of the current $10 bill The United States ten-dollar bill ($10) is a denomination of United States currency. ... Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757 - July 12, 1804) was an Army officer, lawyer, Founding Father, American politician, leading statesman, financier and political theorist. ... The United States Department of the Treasury is a Cabinet department, a treasury, of the United States government established by an Act of U.S. Congress in 1789 to manage the revenue of the United States government. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 329 pixelsFull resolution (913 × 376 pixel, file size: 122 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Series 1995 United States $20 bill. ... The United States twenty-dollar bill ($20) is a denomination of United States currency. ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... 2004 Federal Reserve Note - Obverse 2004 Federal Reserve Note - Reverse The United States fifty-dollar bill ($50) is a denomination of United States currency. ... Ulysses S. Grant,[2] born Hiram Ulysses Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885), was an American general and the eighteenth President of the United States (1869–1877). ... The United States Capitol is the capitol building that serves as the location for the United States Congress, the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. ... Obverse of the Series 2003A $100 bill Reverse of the Series 2003A $100 bill The United States one hundred-dollar bill ($100) is a denomination of United States currency. ... Benjamin Franklin (January 17 [O.S. January 6] 1706 – April 17, 1790) was one of the most well known Founding Fathers of the United States. ... Independence Hall is a U.S. national landmark located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on Chestnut Street between 5th and 6th Streets. ... Image File history File links 500-2f. ... Image File history File links 500-2b. ... Today, the currency of the United States, the U.S. dollar, is printed in bills in denominations of $1, $2, $5, $10, $20, $50, and $100. ... This article is about the 25th President of the United States; for other people named William McKinley, see William McKinley (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links 1000-2f. ... Image File history File links 1000-2b. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908), the twenty-second and twenty-fourth President of the United States, was the only President to serve non-consecutive terms (1885–1889 and 1893–1897). ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... James Madison (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836), was an American politician and the fourth President of the United States (1809–1817), and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. ... Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808 – May 7, 1873) was an American politician and jurist in the Civil War era who served as Senator from Ohio, Governor of Ohio, as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Abraham Lincoln, and Chief Justice of the United States. ... Image File history File linksMetadata US_$5_obverse. ... Image File history File linksMetadata US_$5_reverse. ... Obverse of the $5 bill Reverse of the $5 bill The United States five-dollar bill ($5) is a denomination of United States currency. ... ImageMetadata File history File links US_$10_Series_2003_obverse. ... ImageMetadata File history File links US_$10_Series_2003_reverse. ... Obverse of the current $10 bill, which entered circulation March 2, 2006 Reverse of the current $10 bill The United States ten-dollar bill ($10) is a denomination of United States currency. ... The United States twenty-dollar bill ($20) is a denomination of United States currency. ... 2004 Federal Reserve Note - Obverse 2004 Federal Reserve Note - Reverse The United States fifty-dollar bill ($50) is a denomination of United States currency. ... This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... ImageMetadata File history File links US_$100_reverse. ... Obverse of the Series 2003A $100 bill Reverse of the Series 2003A $100 bill The United States one hundred-dollar bill ($100) is a denomination of United States currency. ...

Post-2004 Redesigned Series

Beginning in 2003, the Federal Reserve introduced a new series of bills, featuring images of the symbols of freedom. The new $20 bill was first issued on October 9, 2003; the new $50 on September 28, 2004; the new $10 bill on March 2, 2006; the new $5 scheduled on March 13, 2008 and the new $100 in later 2008.[10] is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...

Color series
Image Value Main Color Description Date of
Obverse Reverse Obverse Reverse Watermark first series Issue
$5 Purple President Abraham Lincoln; Great Seal of the United States Lincoln Memorial Two Watermarks of the Number "5" 2006 13 March 2008
$10 Orange Secretary Alexander Hamilton; parts of the United States Constitution and the torch of the Statue of Liberty United States Department of Treasury Building As portrait 2004 A 2 March 2006
$20 Green President Andrew Jackson; Eagle White House 2004 9 October 2003
$50 Blue President Ulysses S. Grant; Flag of the United States United States Capitol 2004 28 September 2004
These images are to scale at 0.7 pixels per millimeter, a Wikipedia standard for world banknotes. For table standards, see the banknote specification table.

All small-sized bills measure 6.14 × 2.61 in = 155.956 × 66.294 mm. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Obverse of the $5 bill Reverse of the $5 bill The United States five-dollar bill ($5) is a denomination of United States currency. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Obverse The Great Seal of the United States is used to authenticate certain documents issued by the United States government. ... The Lincoln Memorial, in Washington, D.C., is a United States Presidential memorial built to honor 16th President Abraham Lincoln. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links US10dollarbill-Series_2004A.jpg New US 10 bill (front) Series 2004A Source: United States Treasury Bureau of Engraving and Printing The image above depicts a unit of currency issued by the United States of America. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 356 pixelsFull resolution (7727 × 3436 pixel, file size: 18. ... Obverse of the current $10 bill, which entered circulation March 2, 2006 Reverse of the current $10 bill The United States ten-dollar bill ($10) is a denomination of United States currency. ... Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757 - July 12, 1804) was an Army officer, lawyer, Founding Father, American politician, leading statesman, financier and political theorist. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The United States Constitution The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... For other monuments to freedom, see Monument of Liberty. ... The United States Department of the Treasury is a Cabinet department, a treasury, of the United States government established by an Act of U.S. Congress in 1789 to manage the revenue of the United States government. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This file has been listed on Wikipedia:Images and media for deletion. ... This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... The United States twenty-dollar bill ($20) is a denomination of United States currency. ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... Genera Several, see below. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Downloaded from U.S. Bureau of Engraving and Printing | New Money | Media Center: http://www. ... Downloaded from U.S. Bureau of Engraving and Printing | New Money | Media Center: http://www. ... 2004 Federal Reserve Note - Obverse 2004 Federal Reserve Note - Reverse The United States fifty-dollar bill ($50) is a denomination of United States currency. ... Ulysses S. Grant,[2] born Hiram Ulysses Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885), was an American general and the eighteenth President of the United States (1869–1877). ... Union Jack. ... The United States Capitol is the capitol building that serves as the location for the United States Congress, the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


See also

the bomb. ...

References

  1. ^ Answers.com. Gold standard. Retrieved on 2008-02-17.
  2. ^ United States Department of the Treasury. Organization chart of the Department of the Treasury. Retrieved on 2008-02-17.
  3. ^ Federal Reserve System (2005-06-27). Currency: Notes and Coin - Frequently Asked Questions. Retrieved on 2008-02-17.
  4. ^ a b USPaperMoney.info. History of Currency Designs - A last few changes, and then stability. Retrieved on 2008-02-19.
  5. ^ a b Federal Reserve Bank of New York (April 2007). How Currency Gets into Circulation. Retrieved on 2008-02-17.
  6. ^ Note Printing Australia (March 2008). Polymer substrate - the foundation for a secure banknote=2008-03-15.
  7. ^ CNNMoney.com (2006-11-29). Judge rules paper money unfair to blind. Retrieved on 2008-02-17.
  8. ^ Article about the Court Order from the San Francisco Chronicle
  9. ^ Devoted to Truth. Evolution from Gold to Fiat Money. Retrieved on 2008-02-19.
  10. ^ Bureau of Engraving and Printing. The Redesigned Currency: Safer, Smarter, More Secure. Retrieved on 2008-02-17.

This article incorporates text from the website of the US Treasury, which is in the public domain. Answers. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The U.S. Treasury building today. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Fed redirects here. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Federal Reserve Bank of New York is the most important of the twelve Federal Reserve Banks of the United States. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Note Printing Australia (NPA), which is located in Craigieburn, Melbourne, is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Reserve Bank of Australia and was corporatised in July 1998. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Todays San Francisco Chronicle was founded in 1865 as The Daily Dramatic Chronicle by teenage brothers Charles de Young and Michael H. de Young. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... the bomb. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...


External links

Numismatics Portal
  • Bureau of Engraving and Printing
  • Six Kinds of United States Paper Currency
Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (910x910, 596 KB)Media:Example. ... The Fed redirects here. ... USD redirects here. ... Seal of the U.S. Mint Denver United States mint building The United States Mint primarily produces circulating coinage for the United States to conduct its trade and commerce. ... Top row: Sacagawea Dollar, Lincoln Cent, and Roosevelt Dime. ... The United States one-cent coin is a unit of currency equaling one-hundredth of a United States dollar. ... The United States five-cent coin, commonly called a nickel, is a unit of currency equaling one-twentieth, or five hundredths, of a United States dollar. ... For other uses, see Dime. ... A quarter is a coin worth one-quarter of a United States dollar, or 25 cents. ... The Half Dollar of the United States has been produced nearly every year since the inception of the United States Mint in 1794. ... Dollar coins have been minted in the United States in gold, silver, and base metal versions. ... Reverse of Presidential dollar coin The Presidential $1 Coin Program is part of an Act of Congress, Pub. ... The American Buffalo is a 24 karat gold bullion coin first released by the United States Mint in June 2006. ... For the US one-dollar coin, see United States dollar coin. ... Face of the Series 1995 $2 bill Back of the Series 1995 $2 bill The United States two-dollar bill ($2) is a current denomination of U.S. currency. ... Obverse of the $5 bill Reverse of the $5 bill The United States five-dollar bill ($5) is a denomination of United States currency. ... Obverse of the current $10 bill, which entered circulation March 2, 2006 Reverse of the current $10 bill The United States ten-dollar bill ($10) is a denomination of United States currency. ... The United States twenty-dollar bill ($20) is a denomination of United States currency. ... 2004 Federal Reserve Note - Obverse 2004 Federal Reserve Note - Reverse The United States fifty-dollar bill ($50) is a denomination of United States currency. ... Obverse of the Series 2003A $100 bill Reverse of the Series 2003A $100 bill The United States one hundred-dollar bill ($100) is a denomination of United States currency. ... Today, the currency of the United States, the U.S. dollar, is printed in bills in denominations of $1, $2, $5, $10, $20, $50, and $100. ... Quarter bicentennial reverse Half dollar bicentennial reverse Dollar bicentennial reverse All quarter, half dollar and dollar coins produced by the United States Mint during the years 1975 and 1976 bore special designs on their reverse, commemorating the 200th anniversary (bicentennial) of the independence of the United States. ... Commemorative coinage of the United States consists of coins that have been minted to commemorate a particular event, person or organization. ... Six Confederate notes The Confederate States of America dollar was first issued into circulation in April, 1861, when the Confederacy was only two months old, and on the eve of the outbreak of the Civil War. ... Fake $200 bill featuring George W. Bush Fake denominations of United States currency have been created by individuals as practical jokes, by money artists like J. S. G. Boggs, or as genuine attempts at counterfeiting. ... Production values for each year are the sum of all facility outputs of business strike coins. ... For other uses, see In God We Trust (disambiguation). ... The Fed redirects here. ... The Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC), a component of the Federal Reserve System, is charged under U.S. law with overseeing open market operations in the United States, and is the principal tool of US national monetary policy. ... The Chairman of the Board of Governors of the United States Federal Reserve is the head of the central bank of the United States and one of the more important decision-makers in American economic policies. ... The Fed redirects here. ... Federal Reserve bank notes were United States currency issued by individual Federal Reserve banks. ... ... The Federal Reserve of the United States gathers and publishes certain economic data and releases them as a Federal Reserve Statistical Release. ... The Rainbow Books are a collection of standards defining the allowed formats of Compact Discs. ... Federal Funds transactions redistribute bank reserves. ... The federal funds rate is the interest rate at which private depository institutions lend balances (federal funds) at the Federal Reserve to other depository institutions overnight. ... The Federal Reserve Act (ch. ... The Depository Institutions Deregulation and Monetary Control Act, a United States federal financial statute law passed in 1980, gave the Federal Reserve greater control over non-member banks. ... This article is about the history of central banking in the United States, from the 1790s to the present. ... The Aldrich-Vreeland Act of 1908 established a National Monetary Commission which recommended the Federal Reserve Act of 1913. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Federal Reserve Note - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1318 words)
Federal Reserve Notes (FRNs, "ferns") is the official comma for the type of banknote used in the United States, more commonly known as a bill (as in "twenty-dollar bill").
Federal Reserve Notes are currency, with the words "this note is legal tender for all debts, public and private" printed on each bill.
Federal Reserve Notes are fiat currency, which means that they are not redeemable in gold, silver or any other form of lawful money (even though U.S.C. states "Federal Reserve Notes...shall be redeemed in lawful money on demand").
Federal Reserve Note - definition of Federal Reserve Note in Encyclopedia (407 words)
Federal Reserve note is the official name for the kind of banknote used in the United States, more commonly known as dollar bills.
Despite no longer being issued by Treasury Department, Federal Reserve notes must be signed by the Treasurer of the United States and the United States Secretary of the Treasury before becoming legal currency.
Federal Reserve Banks obtain the notes from the United States Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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