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Encyclopedia > Federal Hill, Baltimore
Federal Hill Park seen from the Observation deck of the World Trade Center, Baltimore.

Federal Hill is a neighborhood in Baltimore, Maryland, United States that lies just to the south of the city's central business district. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixels Full resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 546 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixels Full resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 546 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Nickname: Motto: The Greatest City in America,[3] Get in on it. ...

Contents

Location

The neighborhood is named for the prominent hill that is easily viewed from the Inner Harbor area, to which the neighborhood forms the physical south boundary. The hillside is a lush green and serves as a community park. The neighborhood occupies the northwestern part of a peninsula that extends along two branches of the Patapsco River—the Northwest Branch (ending at the Inner Harbor) and the Middle Branch. This peninsula is generally referred to as the South Baltimore Peninsula, and includes the neighborhoods of Federal Hill, Locust Point, South Baltimore, and Sharp-Leadenhall. While not physically a part of the peninsula, Otterbein is also included in the collection of neighborhoods which make up greater South Baltimore. Traditionally, Federal Hill was roughly triangular, bordered by Hanover Street to the west; Hughes Street, the harbor, and Key Highway to the north and east; and Fort Avenue to the south. The Inner Harbor is a historic seaport, tourist attraction, and iconic landmark of the City of Baltimore. ... The Patapsco is a river in central and coastal Maryland. ... The Inner Harbor is a historic seaport, tourist attraction, and iconic landmark of the City of Baltimore. ... Locust Point is a pennisular neighborhood in Baltimore, Maryland. ... Otterbein is a small neighborhood of historic rowhouses in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. ...


Amenities

View of Baltimore's Inner Harbor from Federal Hill.

The Cross Street Market, a recently-renovated historic marketplace built in the 19th century, continues to serve residents and is the primary social and commercial hub for the neighborhood. The primary business district is bounded by Montgomery, Ostend, Light, and Hanover Streets, and is home to a large number of restaurants of a wide range of taste, quality, and price, and many small shops as well as a few larger, more practical stores. The neighborhood is a popular destination for tavern goers and music lovers, with street festivals several times a year. These are organized through a very active neighborhood organization and business organization, as is the annual Shakespeare on the Hill series of summer performances in the park atop the actual Federal Hill. The neighborhood is also home to the American Visionary Art Museum and Maryland Science Center. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 189 pixels Full resolution (6695 × 1584 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 189 pixels Full resolution (6695 × 1584 pixel, file size: 3. ... The Cross Street Market is a historic marketplace built in the 19th century in Federal Hill, Baltimore, United states. ... The American Visionary Art Museum (AVAM) is an art museum located in Baltimore, Maryland. ... The Maryland Science Center opened to the public in 1976, with 3 levels of exhibits and a planetarium. ...

Charles Street entrance to the Cross Street Market

Significant and historic houses of worship include Christ Lutheran Church, Ebenezer African Methodist Episcopal Church, Light Street Presbyterian Church, Lee Street Baptist Church, Holy Cross Roman Catholic Church, and St. Mary's Star of the Sea Roman Catholic Church. Federal Hill is served by Federal Hill Elementary School, Francis Scott Key Elementary and Middle School, and Digital Harbor High School. The public library is the Light Street Branch of the famous Enoch Pratt Free Library. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixels Full resolution (3072 × 2048 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixels Full resolution (3072 × 2048 pixel, file size: 2. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Front View of the school Digital Harbor High School is located in Baltimore City, Maryland. ... The Enoch Pratt Free Library, located in Baltimore, Maryland, USA, is one of the oldest free public libraries in the United States. ...


Transportation

Federal Hill is located conveniently to Interstate 95, Interstate 395, the Baltimore-Washington Parkway, and Charles and Light Streets, which provide the major north-south surface route through Baltimore. The western portions of the neighborhood are within walking distance of the Hamburg Street and Camden Yards stops on the Baltimore Light Rail. Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 95 Interstate 95 (abbreviated I-95) is a well-known, important, and heavily traveled highway in the United States Interstate Highway System. ... The 2 mile long Interstate 395 is a spur of Interstate 95 that travels from Interstate 95 to downtown Baltimore. ... The Baltimore-Washington Parkway The Baltimore-Washington Parkway (B-W Parkway) is a federally owned freeway, operated by the National Park Service, running parallel to Interstate 95 approximately five miles to its east between Baltimore, Maryland and Washington, DC. Signs at its termini dedicate it to Gladys Noon Spellman. ... Light rail at BWI station The Baltimore Light Rail is a small light rail network serving Baltimore, Maryland and the surrounding suburbs. ...


Early history

Early in the colonial period the area known as Federal Hill was the site of a paint pigment mining operation. The hill has several tunnels beneath its present parklike setting. On occasion a part of a tunnel will collapse causing the need to infill the area if the depression is near the surface of the edges of the hill.


From early in the history of the city, the hill was a public gathering place and civic treasure. The hill itself was given the name in 1789 after serving as the location for the end of a parade and a following civic celebration of the ratification of the new "Federal" constitution of the United States of America. For much of the early history of Baltimore, the hill was know as Signal Hill because it was home to a maritime observatory serving the merchant and shipping interests of the city by observing the sailing of ships up the Patapsco River and signalling their impending arrival to downtown businesspeople. The Patapsco is a river in central and coastal Maryland. ...


Following the Baltimore riot of 1861, the hill was occupied (against orders from Washington) in the middle of the night by Union troops under the command of General Benjamin F. Butler, who had entered the city stealthily from Annapolis via the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. During the night, Butler and his men erected a small fort, with cannon pointing towards the central business district. Their goal was to guarantee the allegiance of the city and the state of Maryland to the Federal Government under threat of force. This fort and the Union occupation persisted for the duration of the Civil War. A large flag, a few cannon, and a small Grand Army of the Republic monument remain to testify to this period of the hill's history. Baltimore on April 19, 1861 The Baltimore riot of 1861 (also called the Pratt Street Riot and the Pratt Street Massacre) was an incident that took place on April 19, 1861 in Baltimore, Maryland between Confederate sympathizers and infantrymen of the United States Army. ... Benjamin Franklin Butler (November 5, 1818 – January 11, 1893) was an American lawyer and politician who represented Massachusetts in the United States House of Representatives and later served as its governor. ... The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad or B&O was a 19th century railroad which operated in the east coast of the United States and was the first railroad to offer commercial transportation of both people and freight. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 90 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37°53N to 39°43N  - Longitude 75°4W to 79°33... This article is becoming very long. ... Stephenson GAR Memorial, Washington, D.C. For the fictional Star Wars military force, see Army of the Republic The Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) was a fraternal organization composed of veterans of the Union Army who had served in the American Civil War. ...


Recent history: A study in gentrification

In the 20th century, Federal Hill was a working class neighborhood, and by the late 1970s was yet another struggling Baltimore inner-city neighborhood, with increasing crime, racial tension, depressed property values, and an aging and decaying housing stock. Many of the industrial jobs, particularly in the shipyards and factories along the south shore of the Patapsco River, which had long provided the main source of employment for neighborhood residents were in the process of disappearing. The Bethlehem Steel shipyards on the east side of the hill were one of the last to close, in the early 1980s. The nationally-recognized urban homesteading program in nearby Otterbein, begun in 1975, helped spur interest among individuals and businesses in rehabilitating homes in Federal Hill, and it soon became a hotbed of investment and rehabilitation, particularly by young professional baby boomers who had grown up in the suburbs but worked downtown and longed for the excitement and community of urban living.


The investment and growth throughout downtown and especially at the Inner Harbor through the 1980s and 1990s only increased the popularity of Federal Hill living over the decades following the initial reinvestment period. A second period of intense investment and rising property values began in the mid 1990s as the neighborhood was again "discovered" by a new generation of young professionals, which now included many of the children of the baby boomers. This second stage of neighborhood investment has included not just single-family home rehabilitation but increasingly large development projects on former industrial sites, particularly on the edges of the neighborhood around the water's edge. Within the core of the neighborhood itself, there has been an influx of new restaurants and shops.


Much of working class South Baltimore to the south of Cross Street has been redefined as part of Federal Hill particularly by those in the real estate business. This distinction is not shared by the city government, academic observers, many neighborhood residents, or official neighborhood organization boundaries. One resident noted in an interview with the Baltimore Sun that he "lived all his life in South Baltimore and then woke up one day in Federal Hill." This remark is characteristic of the tension along lines of class, race, and neighborhood identity that exists in many gentrifying communities, and is particularly true of the so-called "South Federal Hill" and Locust Point areas, along with the rest of the South Baltimore peninsula. The same real estate-driven, gentrifying expansion of Federal Hill is already pressing on on the borders of the most blighted neighborhood in South Baltimore, the historic African-American community of Sharp-Leadenhall, one of the earliest African-American communities in Baltimore. Residents there fear the loss of cultural and neighborhood identity while at the same time hope for some share of the improvement that has come to Federal Hill and other surrounding communities. Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ...


The City of Baltimore, similar to other municipal governments, struggles to develop policy to address gentrification in Federal Hill and elsewhere. The need for increased tax revenue and desire for investment dollars, when balanced against concerns and needs of long-term residents within rapidly-gentrifying areas, often results in inaction. As a result, in Baltimore as elsewhere, long term families and especially elderly residents are forced out of their generations-old homes due to rising property values and the accompanying increase in property taxes. This double-edged and continuing effect of gentrification is part of the ongoing legacy and reality of Federal Hill and similar neighborhoods.


Demographics

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 2,400 people residing in the neighborhood. The racial makeup of Federal Hill was 87.3% White, 9.0% African American, 0.2% Native American, 2.1% Asian, 0.6% from other races, and 1.3% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.3% of the population. 55.6% of occupied housing units were owner-occuped. 8.8% of housing units were vacant. 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... Occupancy is a defined legal term in building construction and building codes. ...


75.9% of the population were employed, 1.4% were unemployed, and 22.7% were not in the labor force. The median household income was $62,466. About 1.0% of families and 7.0% of the population were below the poverty line. Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


21.8% of Federal Hill residents walked to work.


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Live in Baltimore - Federal Hill (1077 words)
Federal Hill Park, one of the city's prime landmarks, is on the northern edge of the neighborhood.
Federal troops occupied the hill and trained their cannon on the city, whose loyalty to the North was in some doubt.
Federal Hill itself was mined for sand for a nearby glassworks, leaving behind some caverns which exist to this day and are a favorite subject of legends.
Mothers Federal Hill Grille - South Baltimore Bar and Restaurant plus live music (355 words)
Mother's Federal Hill Grille is a neighborhood bar and restaurant that serves breakfast, lunch, and dinner.
Mothers is in downtown Baltimore within walking distance from the Inner Harbor, the Convention Center, MandT Bank Stadium (home of the Baltimore Ravens) and Oriole Park at Camden Yards.
Baltimore's Best Crabcakes plus Outside Dining and an outstanding carry-out menu that can be downloaded online, Mother's Federal Hill Grille is a neighborhood bar and restaurant that serves breakfast, lunch, and dinner.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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