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Encyclopedia > Federal Aviation Administration
Federal Aviation Administration
Federal Aviation Administration
Agency overview
Formed August 23, 1958
Preceding Agency Civil Aeronautics Administration
Jurisdiction Federal government of the United States
Agency Executive Robert A. Sturgell (Acting), Administrator
Parent agency United States Department of Transportation
Website
faa.gov
Footnotes
[1][2][3]

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is an agency of the United States Department of Transportation with authority to regulate and oversee all aspects of civil aviation in the U.S. The Federal Aviation Act of 1958 created the group under the name "Federal Aviation Agency", and adopted its current name in 1967 when it became a part of the United States Department of Transportation. The FAA is the single most influential governmentally-ran aviation agency in the world, with the European Aviation Safety Agency in a close second. FAA may refer to: Federal Aviation Administration, a United States government agency Federal Arbitration Act, a United States federal law Fetch-and-add, a special CPU instruction that atomically modifies the contents of a memory location Fleet Air Arm, part of the United Kingdoms Royal Navy Fuerza Aérea... Image File history File links US-FederalAviationAdmin-Seal. ... {| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jan. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the federal government of the United States. ... The United States Department of Transportation (DOT) is a federal Cabinet department of the United States government concerned with transportation. ... The United States Department of Transportation (DOT) is a federal Cabinet department of the United States government concerned with transportation. ... Civil airliner - Air India Boeing 747-400 Civil aviation is one of two major categories of flying, representing all non-Military aviation, both private and commercial. ... The United States Department of Transportation (DOT) is a federal Cabinet department of the United States government concerned with transportation. ... Agency of the European Union Location: Cologne, Germany Formation: - Signed - Established September 28, 2003 Superseding pillar: European Community Director: Patrick Goudou Website: easa. ...


The Federal Aviation Administration's major roles include:

  • Regulating U.S. commercial space transportation
  • Encouraging and developing civil aeronautics, including new aviation technology
  • Regulating civil aviation to promote safety
  • Developing and operating a system of air traffic control and navigation for both civil and military aircraft
  • Researching and developing the National Airspace System and civil aeronautics
  • Developing and carrying out programs to control aircraft noise and other environmental effects of civil aviation

Contents

Activities

FAA Headquarters, Washington, DC
FAA Headquarters, Washington, DC

In December 2000 an organization within the FAA called the Air Traffic Organization, or ATO, was set up by presidential executive order. This became the Air Navigation Service Provider for the airspace of the United States and for the New York (Atlantic) and Oakland (Pacific) oceanic areas. It is a full member of the Civil Air Navigation Services Organization. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 256 × 197 pixelsFull resolution (256 × 197 pixel, file size: 16 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)FAA Headquarters, Washington, DC courtesy of the FAA FAA File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 256 × 197 pixelsFull resolution (256 × 197 pixel, file size: 16 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)FAA Headquarters, Washington, DC courtesy of the FAA FAA File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to... An Air Navigation Service Provider (ANSP) is a body that manages aviation related traffic in a block of airspace on behalf of a company, region or country. ...


The FAA issues a number of awards to holders of its licenses. Among these are demonstrated proficiencies as a mechanic, an instructor, a 50-year aviator, or as a safe pilot. The latter, the FAA "Wings Program", provides a series of ten badges for pilots who have undergone several hours of training since their last award. A higher level can be claimed each year. For more information see "FAA Advisory Circular 61-91H". An award is something given to a person or group of people to recognize excellence in a certain field. ... The FAAs Pilot Proficiency Award Program (Wings) promotes air safety and encourages general aviation pilots to continue training and provides an opportunity to practice selected maneuvers in a minimum of instruction time. ...


The FAA exercises surprise Red Team drills on national airports annually. In wargaming, the opposing force in a simulated military conflict is known as the Red Team, and is used to reveal weaknesses in current military readiness. ...


In 2006, the FAA certified the PhostrEx fire suppression system for use in aircraft engines. Halon was previously the only choice for fire suppression on aircraft. However, it is heavy, expensive, and is a greenhouse gas and extremely harmful to the ozone layer. PhostrEx meets the requirements of both the Montreal Protocol and the Clean Air Act, and is the first commercially viable FAA & EPA certified halon replacement fire extinguishing agent. Halon 1211 and Halon 1301 are special-purpose fire extiguishing agents that were banned by the Montreal Protocol. ... Top: Increasing atmospheric CO2 levels as measured in the atmosphere and ice cores. ... The ozone layer is a layer in Earths atmosphere which contains relatively high concentrations of ozone (O3). ... The largest Antarctic ozone hole recorded as of September 2006 For other similarly-named agreements, see Montreal Convention (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... EPA redirects here. ...


History

The Air Commerce Act of May 20, 1926, is the cornerstone of the federal government's regulation of civil aviation. This landmark legislation was passed at the urging of the aviation industry, whose leaders believed the airplane could not reach its full commercial potential without federal action to improve and maintain safety standards. The Act charged the Secretary of Commerce with fostering air commerce, issuing and enforcing air traffic rules, licensing pilots, certifying aircraft, establishing airways, and operating and maintaining aids to air navigation. A new aeronautics branch of the Department of Commerce assumed primary responsibility for aviation oversight. Governments have played an important part in shaping air transportation. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The office of the U.S. Secretary of Commerce in the mid-20th century. ... The United States Department of Commerce is a Cabinet department of the United States government concerned with promoting economic growth. ...


In fulfilling its civil aviation responsibilities, the Department of Commerce initially concentrated on such functions as safety regulations and the certification of pilots and aircraft. It took over the building and operation of the nation's system of lighted airways, a task that had been begun by the Post Office Department. The Department of Commerce improved aeronautical radio communications and introduced radio beacons as an effective aid to air navigation. The Post Office Department was the former name of the United States Postal Service when it was a cabinet department. ...


The Aeronautics Branch was renamed the Bureau of Air Commerce in 1934 to reflect its enhanced status within the Department. As commercial flying increased, the Bureau encouraged a group of airlines to establish the first three centers for providing air traffic control (ATC) along the airways. In 1936, the Bureau itself took over the centers and began to expand the ATC system. The pioneer air traffic controllers used maps, blackboards, and mental calculations to ensure the safe separation of aircraft traveling along designated routes between cities. For the Canadian musical group, see Air Traffic Control (band). ... Year 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1938, the Civil Aeronautics Act transferred the federal civil aviation responsibilities from the Commerce Department to a new independent agency, the Civil Aeronautics Authority. The legislation also expanded the government's role by giving them the authority and the power to regulate airline fares and to determine the routes that air carriers would serve. Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... ...


President Franklin D. Roosevelt split the authority into two agencies in 1940, the Civil Aeronautics Administration (CAA) and the Civil Aeronautics Board (CAB). CAA was responsible for ATC, airman and aircraft certification, safety enforcement, and airway development. CAB was entrusted with safety regulation, accident investigation, and economic regulation of the airlines. Both organizations were part of the Department of Commerce. Unlike CAA, however, CAB functioned independently of the Secretary. FDR redirects here. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On the eve of America's entry into World War II, CAA began to extend its ATC responsibilities to takeoff and landing operations at airports. This expanded role eventually became permanent after the war. The application of radar to ATC helped controllers in their drive to keep abreast of the postwar boom in commercial air transportation. In 1946, meanwhile, Congress gave CAA the added task of administering the federal-aid airport program, the first peacetime program of financial assistance aimed exclusively at promoting development of the nation's civil airports. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... For other uses, see Radar (disambiguation). ...


The approaching era of jet travel, and a series of midair collisions, prompted passage of the Federal Aviation Act of 1958. This legislation gave the CAA's functions to a new independent body, the Federal Aviation Agency. The act transferred air safety regulation from the CAB to the new FAA, and also gave the FAA sole responsibility for a common civil-military system of air navigation and air traffic control. The FAA's first administrator, Elwood R. Quesada, was a former Air Force general and adviser to President Eisenhower. Jet aircraft are aircrafts with jet engines. ... Elwood Richard Quesada (1904 - 1993), U.S. administrator and air force general; 1st administrator of Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) from 1959 to 1961. ... “The U.S. Air Force” redirects here. ... Dwight David Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969), nicknamed Ike, was a five-star General in the United States Army and U.S. politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ...


The same year witnessed the birth of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), created in the wake of the Soviet launching of the first artificial satellite. NASA assumed NACA's role of aeronautical research while achieving world leadership in space technology and exploration. NASA Logo Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-09-01, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ...


In 1967, a new U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) combined major federal responsibilities for air and surface transport. FAA's name changed to the Federal Aviation Administration as it became one of several agencies within DOT. At the same time, a new National Transportation Safety Board took over the CAB's role of investigating aviation accidents. The United States Department of Transportation (DOT) is a Cabinet department of the United States government concerned with transport. ...


The FAA gradually assumed additional functions. The hijacking epidemic of the 1960s had already brought the agency into the field of civil aviation security. In response to the hijackings on September 11, 2001, this responsibility is now primarily taken by the Department of Homeland Security. The FAA became more involved with the environmental aspects of aviation in 1968 when it received the power to set aircraft noise standards. Legislation in 1970 gave the agency management of a new airport aid program and certain added responsibilities for airport safety. During the 1960s and 1970s the FAA also started to regulate high altitude (over 500 feet) kite and balloon flying. DHS redirects here. ...


By the mid-1970s, the FAA had achieved a semi-automated air traffic control system using both radar and computer technology. This system required enhancement to keep pace with air traffic growth, however, especially after the Airline Deregulation Act of 1978 phased out the CAB's economic regulation of the airlines. A nationwide strike by the air traffic controllers union in 1981 forced temporary flight restrictions but failed to shut down the airspace system. During the following year, the agency unveiled a new plan for further automating its air traffic control facilities, but progress proved disappointing. In 1994, the FAA shifted to a more step-by-step approach that has provided controllers with advanced equipment. For other uses, see Radar (disambiguation). ... The Professional Air Traffic Controllers Organization or PATCO was a labor union that once represented air traffic controllers in the United States in matters relating to wages, hours, and other terms and conditions of employment. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ...


In 1979 the Congress authorized the FAA to work with major commercial airports to define noise pollution contours and investigate the feasibility of noise mitigation by residential retrofit programs. Throughout the 1980s these charters were implemented. Noise pollution (or environmental noise in technical venues) is displeasing human or machine created sound that disrupts the environment. ... Contour map A contour line (also isopleth, level set, isogram or isarithm) for a function of two variables is a curve connecting points where the function has a particular value. ... Noise mitigation is a set of strategies to reduce unwanted environmental sound. ...


In the 1990s, satellite technology received increased emphasis in the FAA's development programs as a means to improvements in communications, navigation, and airspace management. In 1995, the agency assumed responsibility for safety oversight of commercial space transportation, a function begun eleven years before by an office within DOT headquarters. The FAA was responsible for the decision to ground flights on 9/11. Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... The date that commonly refers to the attacks on United States citizens on September 11, 2001 (see the September 11, 2001 Attacks). ...


FAA ordered its inspectors March 18, 2008 to reconfirm that airlines are complying with federal rules after revelations that Southwest Airlines flew dozens of aircraft without certain mandatory inspections.[2] is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... An Airbus A380 of Emirates Airline An airline provides air transport services for passengers or freight. ... This article is about the American airline. ...


List of FAA Administrators

Elwood Richard Quesada (1904 - 1993), U.S. administrator and air force general; 1st administrator of Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) from 1959 to 1961. ... Photo courtesy of AUB Najeeb Halaby (Arabic: ‎; September 19, 1915 - July 2, 2003) was a U.S. businessman, government official, and the father of Queen Noor of Jordan. ... Alexander Porter Butterfield (born April 6, 1926) was the deputy assistant to Richard Nixon from 1969 until 1973. ... Langhorne M. Bond (born c1941) was the Administrator of the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration from 1977 to 1981 under President Jimmy Carter. ... David Hinson is an aircraft pilot and former head of Midway Airlines (ML). ... Jane F. Garvey was appointed Federal Aviation Administration Administrator by President Bill Clinton. ... Marion Clifton Blakey (born March 26, 1948) was the 15th Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration. ... In law, when someone is said to be acting in a position it can mean one of three things. ...

See also

Aircraft noise is defined as sound produced by any aircraft on run-up, taxiing, take off, over flying or landing. ... This Vans Aircraft RV-7 displays the registration G-KELS. The G- prefix denotes that it is registered in the United Kingdom. ... For the Canadian musical group, see Air Traffic Control (band). ... Archie William League (August 19, 1907 – October 1, 1986) is generally considered the first air traffic controller. ... Ben Sliney was the FAA Director of Operations on Sept. ... The Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) is the name for the national body governing civil aviation in a number of countries. ... The Federal Air Marshal Service is a U.S. federal agency. ... The Federal Aviation Regulations, or FARs, are rules prescribed by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) governing all aviation activities in the United States. ... Free flight is a developing air traffic control method that uses no centralized control (e. ... Flight training is a course of study used when learning to pilot an aircraft. ... The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), an agency of the United Nations, develops the principles and techniques of international air navigation and fosters the planning and development of international air transport to ensure safe and orderly growth. ... The National Air Traffic Controllers Association (NATCA) is a labor union in the United States. ... NextGen or Next Generation Air Transportation System is the name given to the project which is set to completely overhaul the national airspace system(NAS). ... Noise regulation includes statutes or guidelines relating to sound transmission established by national, state or provincial and municipal levels of government. ... The Office of Commercial Space Transportation is a division of the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) that approves any commercial rocket launches—that is, any launches that are not classified as model, amateur, or by and for the government. ... The Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) is a joint project between the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), along with local airports and aviation authorities. ... TSA emblem The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is a U.S. government agency that was created as part of the Aviation and Transportation Security Act passed by the U.S. Congress and signed into law by President George W. Bush on November 19, 2001. ...

References

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ F.A.A. Chief to Lead Industry Group - New York Times
  3. ^ FAA Chief To Become Aerospace Lobbyist - washingtonpost.com

External links

  • FAA
  • FOCUS FAA
  • ATO News
  • Jane's Airport news on user fees, April 2006
Image File history File links US-DeptOfTransportation-Seal. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Federal Aviation Administration: Information from Answers.com (2609 words)
The FAA is authorized to test and evaluate aviation systems, subsystems, equipment, devices, materials, concepts, and procedures at any phase in their development, from conception to acceptance and implementation.
The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is an agency of the United States Department of Transportation with authority to regulate and oversee all aspects of civil aviation in the U.S. Activities
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Federal Aviation Administration - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1170 words)
The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is an agency of the United States Department of Transportation with authority to regulate and oversee all aspects of civil aviation in the U.S. Contents
This landmark legislation was passed at the urging of the aviation industry, whose leaders believed the airplane could not reach its full commercial potential without federal action to improve and maintain safety standards.
The FAA was responsible for the Decision to Ground flights on 9/11.
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