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Encyclopedia > Feast of the Lemures

In Roman religion, the Feast of the Lemures, called the Lemuralia or Lemuria, was a feast during which the ancient Romans performed rites to exorcise the malevolent and fearful ghosts of the dead from their homes. The unwholesome and malevolent sprectres of the restless dead (lemures) were propitiated with offerings of beans. On those days, the Vestals would prepare sacred mola salsa (salt cake) from the first ears of wheat of the season. Religion in ancient Rome combined several different cult practices and embraced more than a single set of beliefs. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that existed in Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East between 753 BC and its downfall in AD 476. ... A rite is an established, ceremonious, usually religious act. ... Exorcism is the practice of evicting or destroying demons or other evil spiritual entities which are supposed to have possessed (taken control of) a person or a building. ... Larvae are the plural of larva, juvenile form of animals with indirect development. ... Green beans Bean is a common name for large plant seeds of several genera of Fabaceae (formerly Leguminosae) used for food or feed. ... A vestal Virgin, engraving by Sir Frederick Leighton, ca 1890: Leightons artistic sense has won over his passion for historical accuracy in showing the veil over the Vestals head at sacrifices, the suffibulum, as translucent, instead of fine white wool. ... Species T. boeoticum T. durum T. monococcum T. spelta References:   ITIS 42236 2002-09-22 Wheat (Triticum spp. ...

Topics in Roman mythology
Important Gods:
Legendary History
Roman religion
Greek/Roman myth compared
Other minor Roman deities:

In the Julian calendar the three days of the feast were 9, 11, and 13 May. The myth of origin of this ancient festival was that it had been instituted by Romulus to appease the spirit of Remus (Ovid, Fasti, verse 473ff.). Ovid notes that at this festival it was the custom to appease or expel the evil spirits by walking barefoot and throwing black beans over the shoulder at night. It was the head of the household who was responsible for getting up at midnight and walking around the house with bare feet throwing out black beans and repeating the incantation, "With these beans I redeem me and mine" nine times. The household would then clash bronze pots while repeating, "Ghosts of my fathers and ancestors, be gone!" nine times. Roman mythology can be considered as two parts. ... Jupiter In Roman mythology, Jupiter (sometimes shortened to Jove) held the same role as Zeus in the Greek pantheon. ... Mars was Roman god of war, the son of Juno and a magical flower (or Jupiter). ... In Roman mythology, Quirinus was a mysterious god. ... Vesta was the virgin goddess of the hearth, home, and family in Roman mythology, analogous to Hestia in Greek mythology. ... In the Olympian pantheon of classical Greek Mythology, Hêra (Greek or ) was the wife and sister of Zeus. ... In Roman mythology, Fortuna (Greek equivalent Tyche) was the personification of luck, hopefully of good luck. ... Minerva was a Roman goddess of crafts and wisdom. ... This article treats Mercury in cult practice and in archaic Rome. ... Vulcan, in Roman mythology, is the son of Jupiter and Juno, and husband of Maia and Venus. ... For other uses, see Ceres (disambiguation). ... Venus is the Roman goddess of love, equivalent to Greek Aphrodite and Etruscan Turan. ... Lares (pl. ... For the son of Napoleon I of France, styled the King of Rome, see Napoleon II of France. ... Religion in ancient Rome combined several different cult practices and embraced more than a single set of beliefs. ... A flamen was a priest of the Roman religion. ... Roman mythology was strongly influenced by Greek mythology and Etruscan mythology. ... In Roman mythology, the Di Penates or briefly Penates were originally patron gods (really geniuses) of the storeroom, later becoming household gods guarding the entire household. ... In Roman mythology, every man had a genius and every woman a juno (Juno was also the name for the queen of the gods). ... In Roman mythology, the Manes (good ones) were similar to the Lares, Genii and Di Penates. ... Larvae are the plural of larva, juvenile form of animals with indirect development. ... In Roman mythology, Terminus was the god of boundaries. ... The Julian calendar was introduced by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, taking force in 45 BC or 709 ab urbe condita. ... May 9 is the 129th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (130th in leap years). ... May 11 is the 131st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (132nd in leap years). ... May 13 is the 133rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (134th in leap years). ... Romulus and Remus, (771 BC¹-717 BC Romulus, 771 BC-753 BC Remus), the legendary founders of Rome in Roman mythology, were the twin sons of the priestess Rhea Silvia, fathered by the god of war Mars. ... Romulus and Remus, founders of Rome in Roman mythology, were the supposed sons of the god Mars and the priestess Rhea Silvia. ... Engraved frontispiece of George Sandyss 1632 London edition of Publius Ovidus Naso, (Sulmona, March 20, 43 BC â€“ Tomis, now Constanta AD 17) Roman poet known to the English-speaking world as Ovid, wrote on topics of love, abandoned women, and mythological transformations. ... Fasti, a Latin word, refers to the Roman calendar and almanac; and especially, to a long, unfinished poem on the religious festivals of the Roman year and their mythological underpinnings, by the poet Ovid. ... Healthy feet and ideal footprints of a girl who regularly goes barefoot Going barefoot is the practice of walking without shoes or socks. ...


Because of this annual exorcism of the restless malevolent spirits of the dead, the whole month of May was rendered unlucky for marriages, whence the proverb Mense Maio malae nubent ('They wed ill who wed in May'), and thus the rush of June weddings "because the weather is so nice" in our own day. Exorcism is the practice of evicting or destroying demons or other evil spiritual entities which are supposed to have possessed (taken control of) a person or a building. ...


On the culminating day of the Lemuralia, May 13 in 609 or 610— the day being recorded as more significant than the year—, Pope Boniface IV consecrated the Pantheon at Rome to the Blessed Virgin and all the martyrs, and the feast of the dedicatio Sanctae Mariae ad Martyres has been celebrated at Rome ever since. Boniface IV (ca. ... The Pantheon, Rome The Pantheon is a building in Rome which was originally built as a temple to all the gods of the Roman state religion, but has been a Christian church since the 7th century AD. It is the only building from the Greco-Roman world which is completely...


This ancient custom was Christianized in the feast of All Saints' Day, established in Rome first on May 13, in order to de-paganize the Roman Lemuria. In the 8th century, as the popular observance of the Lemuria had safely faded over time, the feast of All Saints was shifted to November 1, coinciding with the similar Celtic propitiation of the spirits at Samhain. Pope Gregory III (731-741) consecrated a chapel in the Basilica of St. Peter to all the saints and fixed the anniversary, not by chance, for 1 November. All Saints in Poland The festival of All Saints, also sometimes known as All Hallows, or Hallowmas, is a feast celebrated in honour of all the saints and martyrs, known or unknown. ... Samhain (Irish samhain, Scots Gaelic samhuinn, pronounced [sāvīn]) is the word for November in the Gaelic. ... Saint Gregory III, pope (731-741), a Syrian by birth, succeeded Gregory II in March 731. ... Interior view, with the Nave of the Cattedra in the back St. ...


The idea that this festival was the origin of that of All Saints, which was moved later to November 1, has now been abandoned by Roman Catholics, though not by cultural historians. All Saints in Poland The festival of All Saints, also sometimes known as All Hallows, or Hallowmas, is a feast celebrated in their honour. ...


See also the history of Halloween, and Larvae. hello andy Halloween is a holiday celebrated on the night of October 31, usually by children dressing in costumes and going door-to-door collecting candy. ... Larvae are the plural of larva, juvenile form of animals with indirect development. ...


Sources

  • http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Roman/Texts/secondary/SMIGRA*/Lemuralia.html Smith, William, 1875. Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Feast of the Lemures (254 words)
The Feast of the Lemures, called the Lemuralia or Lemuria was a feast during which the ancient Romans performed rites to exorcise the malevolent and fearful ghosts of the dead from their homes.
In the Julian calendar the three days of the feast were the 9th, 11th, and 13th of May. The myth of origin of this ancient festival was that it had been instituted by Romulus to appease the spirit of Remus (Ovid, Fasti, verse 473ff.).
Ovid notes that at this festival it was the custom to appease or expel the evil spirits by walking barefoot and throwing fl beans over the shoulder at night.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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