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Encyclopedia > Feast of the Cross
Eastern Orthodox Icon of the Exaltation of the Cross
Liturgical year
Western
Eastern

In the Christian liturgical calendar, there are several different feasts known as Feasts of the Cross, all of which commemorate the cross used in the crucifixion of Jesus. While Good Friday is dedicated to the Passion of Christ and the Crucifixion, these days celebrate the cross itself, as the instrument of salvation. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Eastern Orthodoxy (also called Greek Orthodoxy and Russian Orthodoxy) is a Christian tradition which represents the majority of Eastern Christianity. ... Look up icon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      This article is about... Advent (from the Latin Adventus, implicitly coupled with Redemptoris, the coming of the Saviour) is a holy season of the Christian church, the period of expectant waiting and preparation for the celebration of the Nativity of Christ, also known as the season of Christmas. ... Christmastide (also Christmas or the Christmas season) is one of the seasons of the liturgical year of some Christian churches. ... The Wise Men (Magi) adoring the infant Jesus. ... It has been suggested that Cuaresma be merged into this article or section. ... Easter Triduum, or Holy Triduum, or Paschal Triduum is a term used by some Christian churches, particularly the Roman Catholic Church, the Lutheran Church, and many Anglicans, to denote, collectively, the three days from the evening of Maundy Thursday (or Holy Thursday) to the evening of Easter Sunday. ... Eastertide, or the Easter Season, begins on Easter Sunday and continues until Pentecost in the Christian liturgical calendar, thus spanning a total of seven weeks. ... This article is about the Ascension of Jesus Christ. ... The Descent of the Holy Spirit in a 15th century illuminated manuscript. ... Ordinary Time is a season of the Christian (especially the Catholic) liturgical calendar. ... The Nativity Fast, practiced by the Eastern Orthodox Church, is believed to enable participants to draw closer to God by denying the body of worldly pleasure in preparation for celebration of the birth of Jesus Christ, which is held on December 25th (Julian Calendar). ... For the Nativity of Jesus, see Nativity of Jesus. ... Look up theophany in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Great Lent is the greatest fasting period in the church year in Eastern Christianity, which prepares Christians for the greatest feast of the church year, Easter (or Holy Pascha). Although it is in many ways similar to Lent in Western Christianity, there are important differences in the timing of Lent... This article is about the Christian festival. ... The Descent of the Holy Spirit in a 15th century illuminated manuscript. ... The upper part of The Transfiguration (1520) by Raphael, depicting Christ miraculously discoursing with Moses and Elijah The word Transfiguration means a changing of appearance or form. ... Dormition of the Virgin redirects here. ... The Intercession of Our Most Holy Lady Theotokos and Ever-Virgin Mary (Russian Pokrov, Покров) is one of the most important Russian Orthodoxy feasts (maybe the most important after the Twelve Great Feasts). ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... The liturgical year, also known as the Christian year, consists of the cycle of liturgical seasons in some Christian churches which determines when Feasts, Memorials, Commemorations, and Solemnities are to be observed and which portions of Scripture are to be read. ... According to Christian tradition, the True Cross is the cross upon which Jesus was crucified. ... Crucifixion is an ancient method of execution, where the condemned is tied or nailed to a large wooden cross and left to hang until dead. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Good Friday is the Friday before Easter (Easter always falls on a Sunday). ... The Passion is the technical term for the suffering and Agony of Jesus that led directly to the Crucifixion, a central Christian event. ... In theology, salvation can mean three related things: being saved from something, such as suffering or the punishment of sin - also called deliverance; being saved for something, such as an afterlife or participating in the Reign of God - also called redemption Salvation can also be understood in terms of social...

Contents

September 14

The original nam of this feast was the Feast of the Exaltation of the Cross, by which name it is still known by the Orthodox Church and the Eastern Rites of the Catholic Church. Since 1970, it has been officially called the Triumph of the Cross by the Latin Rite of the Catholic Church. In some parts of the Anglican Communion it is called Holy Cross Day, a name also used by Lutherans. In Jewish folklore the feast was established by Saint Peter for converted Jews to observe instead of Rosh Hashana. Eastern Orthodoxy (also called Greek Orthodoxy and Russian Orthodoxy) is a Christian tradition which represents the majority of Eastern Christianity. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... In the Christian liturgical calendar, there are several different feasts known as Feasts of the Cross, all of which commemorate the cross used in the crucifixion of Jesus. ... The Latin Rite is one of the 23 sui iuris particular Churches within the Catholic Church. ... “Catholic Church” redirects here. ... Main article: Anglicanism The Anglican Communion is a world-wide affiliation of Anglican Churches. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... “St Peter” redirects here. ...


The feast commemorates the finding of the True Cross in 325 during a pilgrimage to Jerusalem by St. Helena, the mother of the Roman emperor Constantine I . The Church of the Holy Sepulchre was then built at the site of the discovery, by order of Helena and Constantine. The church was dedicated nine years later, with a portion [1] of the cross placed inside it. In 614, that portion of the cross was carried away from the church by the Persians, and remained missing until it was recaptured by the Byzantine Emperor Heraclius in 628. The cross was returned to the church the following year after initially having been taken to Constantinople by Heraclius. According to Christian tradition, the True Cross is the cross upon which Jesus was crucified. ... Events May 20 - First Council of Nicaea - first Ecumenical Council of the Christian Church: The Nicene Creed is formulated, the date of Easter is discussed. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... Head of Constantines colossal statue at Musei Capitolini Gaius Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus[1] (February 27, 272–May 22, 337), commonly known as Constantine I, Constantine the Great, or (among Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholic[2] Christians) Saint Constantine, was a Roman Emperor, proclaimed Augustus by his troops on... The Church of the Holy Sepulchre, called the Church of the Resurrection (Greek: Ναός της Αναστάσεως, Naos tis Anastaseos; Georgian: აგდგომის ტადზარი Agdgomis Tadzari; Armenian: Surp Harutyun) by Eastern Christians, is a Christian church within the walled Old City of Jerusalem. ... Events The Persian Empire under general Shahrbaraz captures and sacks Jerusalem; the Church of the Holy Sepulchre is damaged by fire and the True Cross is captured. ... The Persians of Iran (officially named Persia by West until 1935 while still referred to as Persia by some) are an Iranian people who speak Persian (locally named Fârsi by native speakers) and often refer to themselves as ethnic Iranians as well. ... This is a list of Byzantine Emperors. ... Heraclius or Herakleios or (Latin: ; Greek: , Hērakleios), (c. ... Events Khusro II of Persia overthrown Pippin of Landen becomes Mayor of the Palace Brahmagupta writes the Brahmasphutasiddhanta Births Deaths Empress Suiko of Japan Theodelinda, queen of the Lombards Categories: 628 ... This article is about the city before the Fall of Constantinople (1453). ...


The date used for the feast marks the dedication of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in 335. This was a two-day festival: although the actual Consecration of the church was on September 13, the cross itself was brought outside the church on September 14 so that the clergy and faithful could pray before it. The Church of the Holy Sepulchre, called the Church of the Resurrection (Greek: Ναός της Αναστάσεως, Naos tis Anastaseos; Georgian: აგდგომის ტადზარი Agdgomis Tadzari; Armenian: Surp Harutyun) by Eastern Christians, is a Christian church within the walled Old City of Jerusalem. ... Events November 7 - Athanasius is banished to Trier, on the charge that he prevented the corn fleet from sailing to Constantinople. ... To consecrate an inanimate object is to dedicate it in a ritual to a special purpose, usually religious. ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Western practices

Exaltation of the Cross from the Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry (Musée Condé, Chantilly)

In Roman Catholic liturgical observance, red vestments are worn at church services conducted on this day, and if the day falls on a Sunday, its Mass is used instead of that for the occurring Sunday in Ordinary Time or after Pentecost which would otherwise fall thereon. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 362 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1219 × 2020 pixel, file size: 450 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Les Très Riches Heures du duc de Berry, Folio 193r - The Exaltation of the Cross the Musée Condé, Chantilly. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 362 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1219 × 2020 pixel, file size: 450 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Les Très Riches Heures du duc de Berry, Folio 193r - The Exaltation of the Cross the Musée Condé, Chantilly. ... An illuminated page from the Très Riches Heures showing the day for exchanging gifts from the month of January The Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry (or simply the Très Riches Heures) is probably the most important illuminated manuscript of the 15th century, le roi des... The front entrance and courtyard at the Château de Chantilly The Château de Chantilly is a historic château located in the town of Chantilly, France. ... Chantilly may refer to: Chantilly, a French city located in the Oise département in the Picardie région. ... Vestments are liturgical garments and articles associated primarily with the Christian religions, especially the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox and Anglican Churches. ... Ordinary Time is a season of the Christian (especially the Catholic) liturgical calendar. ...


Until 1962, the Wednesday, Friday and Saturday of the calendar week after the one in which September 14 falls were designated as one of each year's four sets of Ember days by the church in the West. In more recent years, there have been permissions to move these observances for local reasons. Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... In the liturgical calendar of the Western Christian churches, Ember days are four separate sets of three days within the same week - specifically, the Wednesday, Friday and Saturday - roughly equidistant in the circuit of the year, that were formerly set aside for fasting and prayer. ...


September 14 is the titular feast of the Congregation of Holy Cross. The Congregation of Holy Cross (C.S.C.) is a Roman Catholic congregation of priests and brothers founded in 1837 by the Venerable Father Basil Anthony-Marie Moreau, CSC in Le Mans, France. ...


Eastern practices

In Eastern Orthodox practice, the Exaltation of the Cross commemorates both the finding of the Cross in 326 and its recovery from the Persians in 628, and is considered to be one of the Great Feasts of the church year. One of the high points of the celebration is when the priest or bishop brings the Cross out of the sanctuary, where it has been reposing on the Holy Table (altar). The cross is lying on a tray that has been covered with an Aër (liturgical veil) and decorated with basil leaves and flowers. He sets the cross on a table in the center of the church as the choir sings of the festal Troparion of the Cross: "Save, O Lord, Thy people, and bless Thine inheritance, granting unto Orthodox Christians victory over enemies, and by the power of Thy Cross, do Thou preserve Thy commonwealth." Then, all the members of the congregation prostrate themselves on the ground as all sing, "Before Thy Cross, we bow down in worship, O Master, and Thy holy Resurrection we glorify" three times (at the words "Thy holy Resurrection" all stand up again on their feet). Then all come forward to venerate the cross and receive the priest's blessing. // Great Feasts of the Orthodox Church Easter/Pascha The feast of the Resurrection of Jesus, called Easter or Pascha, is the greatest of the feasts of the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... Look up Altar in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Aër covering a Chalice and Diskos on the Prothesis. ... Binomial name L. Basil (Ocimum basilicum) (pronounced BAY-zl or BAZZ-il), of the Family Lamiaceae, is also known as Sweet Basil. ... Troparion (also tropar, plural: troparia) in Byzantine music and in the religious music of Eastern Orthodoxy is a short hymn of one stanza, or one of a series of stanzas (this may carry the further connotation of a hymn interpolated between psalm verses). ...


In cathedrals and monasteries, a special "Exaltation" is performed by the bishop or abbot, standing in the center of the church. This consists of his taking the cross in his hands and raising it above his head. He makes an exclamation, to which the choir responds, chanting, Kyrie eleison 100 times. As they chant, he makes the sign of the cross with it three times, then slowly bows down to the ground, and stands up again raising the cross above his head as before. This process is repeated four more times to the four points of the compass.[2] A Cathedral is a Christian church building, specifically of a denomination with an episcopal hierarchy, which serves as the central church of a bishopric. ... Monastery of St. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      This article is about a title... Abbots coat of arms The word abbot, meaning father, has been used as a Christian clerical title in various, mainly monastic, meanings. ... Kyrie is a Greek word that means Lord or Oh, Lord. ... For other uses, see Sign of the cross (disambiguation). ...

  • Icon and Synaxarion of the Feast

The Armenian Apostolic Church observes a five-day fast, called the Fast of the Holy Cross from September 10 through September 14, in preparation for the Feast of the Holy Church in view of the Holy Cross, which they celebrate on September 15. September 16 is observed as the Feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross, a feast which continues for several days thereafter. Official standard of Karekin II Catholicos of Armenia The Armenian Apostolic Church (Armenian: Հայ Առաքելական Եկեղեցի, Hay Arakelagan Yegeghetzi), sometimes called the Armenian Orthodox Church or the Gregorian Church, is the worlds oldest national church[1] [2] and one of the most ancient Christian communities [3]. // Baptism of Tiridates III. The earliest... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // 1400 - Owain Glyndŵr declared Prince of Wales by his followers. ...


September 26

The Assyrian Church of the East celebrates the finding of the Cross on September 26, and considers it to be a major feast. The Assyrian Church considers the Sign of the Cross to be a seventh Sacrament, by which all of the other Sacraments are sealed and perfected (it takes the place of Marriage, which they do not name in their traditional list of Sacraments). Church of the East related to those churches under the dominion of the first Patriarchate of Jerusalem which was first transferred from Jerusalem to Pella as following the 135CE Roman ban on Jews the city was given over to Antiochs jurisdiction. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Sign of the cross (disambiguation). ...


October 12

In the Russian Orthodox Church, October 12 is the commemoration of the Translation of a Portion of the Life-Giving Cross from Malta to Gatchina. The Russian Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate (Russian: ), also known as the Orthodox Christian Church of Russia, is a body of Christians who are united under the Patriarch of Moscow, who in turn is in communion with the other patriarchs and primates of the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Gatchina is the city of 84900 inhabitants in the Leningrad oblast of the Russian Federation, 45 km south of St Petersburg by the road leading to Pskov. ...

  • Photo of Relic

March 6

On the liturgical calendar of the Eastern Othodox Church, this day commemorates the Uncovering of the Precious Cross and the Precious Nails by Empress Saint Helen—that is to say, the anniversary of the actual discovery; the date for the September 14 feast was determined by the Consecration of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. This is a lesser feast, and does not have any of the liturgical peculiarities of the September 14 feat.

  • Icon and Synaxarion

May 3

In the Gallican usage, beginning about the seventh century, the Feast of the Cross was celebrated on May 3, and called "Crouchmas" (for "Cross Mass"). According to the Catholic Encyclopedia, when the Gallican and Roman practices were combined, the September date was used to commemorate the rescue from the Persians and the May date was kept as the Finding of the Holy Cross or Invention of the True Cross to commemorate the finding. (The word comes from the Latin invenire, "to find", and should not be understood in the modern sense of creating something new.) This date is that used in the Church of England's Book of Common Prayer liturgy, but the new Common Worship liturgy has followed the Roman Catholic Church's lead, and Holy Cross Day is now celebrated on 14 September. The term Gallican Church usually refers to the Roman Catholic Church in France from the time of the Declaration of the Clergy of France (1682) to that of the Civil Constitution of the Clergy (1790) during the French Revolution. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... The Church of England logo since 1998 The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... For the novel by Joan Didion, see A Book of Common Prayer. ... Common Worship is a series of books of services and prayers, known as a liturgy, published by the Church of England. ...


This feast was removed from the General Roman Calendar effective in 1970 by the Second Vatican Council as part of its policy of either moving or abolishing feasts that would typically occur during Advent or Lent, or in the time between Christmas and the Epiphany or in the time between Easter and Pentecost (May 3 always falls during the latter), as well as removing feasts which celebrate a particular saint or occurrence twice. However, it is still commemorated in some Catholic parishes, and some churches of the Anglican Communion (such as the Church of England) still recognize it as an optional observance. Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, or Vatican II, was the twenty-first Ecumenical Council of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Advent (from the Latin Adventus, implicitly coupled with Redemptoris, the coming of the Saviour) is a holy season of the Christian church, the period of expectant waiting and preparation for the celebration of the Nativity of Christ, also known as the season of Christmas. ... It has been suggested that Cuaresma be merged into this article or section. ... Christmas is an annual holiday that celebrates the birth of Jesus. ... This article is about the Christian feast. ... This article is about the Christian festival. ... The Descent of the Holy Spirit in a 15th century illuminated manuscript. ... Main article: Anglicanism The Anglican Communion is a world-wide affiliation of Anglican Churches. ...


August 1

The Orthodox commemorate the Feast of the Procession of the Venerable Wood of the Cross on August 1st. This day marks the beginning of the Dormition Fast. The propers of the feast are combined with those of the Holy Macabean Martyrs, the commemoration of whose endurance is deemed appropriate for the first day of a fast. Unlike the September 14 observance, this commemoration is considered to be a minor feast, but it does have the bringing out of the cross and veneration by the faithful like the September feast. is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Dormition of the Virgin redirects here. ... The Proper (Latin proprium) is that part of the Christian liturgy that varies according to the date, either representing an observance within the Liturgical Year, or of a particular saint or significant event. ... Wojciech Stattlers Machabeusze (Maccabees), 1844 The Maccabees (Hebrew: מכבים or מקבים, Makabim) were Jewish rebels who fought against the rule of Antiochus IV Epiphanes of the Hellenistic Seleucid dynasty, who was succeeded by his infant son Antiochus V Eupator. ...


The history of this feast begins in Constantinople (modern-day Istanbul, Turkey). It was the custom there to carry the relic of the True Cross through the streets and squares of the city to ask for God's blessing, and for relief from sickness. On the eve of the feast (July 31), which is observed as a Forefeast, it was taken out of the imperial treasury, and laid upon the altar of the "Great Church" (Hagia Sophia). On August 1 it was solemly placed in the center of the Great Church for all the faithful to venerate. The relic was taken in procession daily throughout the city, offering it to the people to venerate until the Feast of the Dormition of the Theotokos (August 15), when it was returned again to the imperial treasury. This article is about the city before the Fall of Constantinople (1453). ... Istanbul (Turkish: , Greek: , historically Byzantium and later Constantinople; see other names) is Turkeys most populous city, and its cultural and financial center. ... A relic is an object, especially a piece of the body or a personal item of someone of religious significance, carefully preserved with an air of veneration as a tangible memorial, Relics are an important aspect of Buddhism, some denominations of Christianity, Hinduism, shamanism, and many other personal belief systems. ... According to Christian tradition, the True Cross is the cross upon which Jesus was crucified. ... An Afterfeast is a period of celebration attached to one of the Great Feasts celebrated by the Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholic Churches (roughly equivalent to what in the West would be called an Octave). ... Look up Altar in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Hagia Sophia The patriarchal basilica Hagia Sophia (Greek: ; Holy Wisdom), now known as the Ayasofya Museum, was the culmination of early Christian architecture. ... Veneration is a religious symbolic act giving honor to someone by honoring an image of that person, particularly applied to saints. ... Dormition of the Virgin redirects here. ...


In commemoration of this tradition, it is customary to have a crucession (a procession headed by the cross) and celebrate the Lesser Blessing of Water on August 1. It is the first of three "Feasts of the Saviour" in the month of August, the other two being the Transfiguration (August 6) and the Icon of Christ "Not Made by Hands" (August 16). Because of the blessing of holy water, this holy day is sometimes called "Savior of the Water." There may also be celebrated on this day the Rite of Blessing New Honey, for which reason the day is also referred to as "Savior of the Honey." It has been suggested that Krestny khod be merged into this article or section. ... A procession (via Middle English processioun, French procession, derived from Latin, processio, itself from procedere, to go forth, advance, proceed) is, in general, an organized body of people advancing in a formal or ceremonial manner. ... St. ... The word Transfiguration means a changing of appearance or form. ... Look up icon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Image of Edessa. ... St. ... The word holiday has related but different meanings in English-speaking countries. ...


According to St. Nikolaj Velimirović, this feast was instituted by mutual agreement of the Greeks and Russians to commemorate the simultaneous victories of the Byzantine Emperor Manuel I Komnenos over the Bulgarians and the Russian Prince Andrei Bogolyubsky over the Saracens in the 12th century.[3] Nikolai Velimirović Photo courtesy of freesrpska. ... This is a list of Byzantine Emperors. ... For the eldest son of Andronikos I Komnenos and father of Alexios I of Trebizond, see Manuel Komnenos (born 1145). ... Andrei Bogolyubsky (Андрей Боголюбский) (ca. ... In older Western historical literature, the Saracens were the people of the Saracen Empire, another name for the Arab Caliphate under the rule of the Umayyad and Abbasid dynasties. ...


In the Russian Orthodox Church, this feast also celebrates the Baptism of Rus, which occurred on August 1, 988. The Russian Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate (Russian: ), also known as the Orthodox Christian Church of Russia, is a body of Christians who are united under the Patriarch of Moscow, who in turn is in communion with the other patriarchs and primates of the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... Clandestine Christian communities existed in Kiev for decades before the official baptism. ... Events Vladimir I, Prince of Kiev marries Anna, sister of Byzantine emperor Basil II and converts to Christianity. ...

  • Synaxarion

Moveable Feasts

In addition to celebrations on fixed days, there are certain days of the variable cycle when the Cross in celebrated. In Christianity, a moveable feast or movable feast is a holy day — a feast or a fast — whose date is not fixed to a particular day of the calendar year but moves in response to the date of Easter, the date of which varies according to a complex formula. ...


The Roman Catholic and Orthodox Churches have a formal Adoration of the Cross during the services for Good Friday. Good Friday is the Friday before Easter (Easter always falls on a Sunday). ...


In the Roman Breviary before the 1961 reform, a Commemoration of the Cross was made during Eastertide except when the Office or Commemoration of a Double or Octave occurs, replacing the Suffrage of the Saints said outside Eastertide. Breviary of Cologne, 12th or 13th century (Helsinki University Library) A breviary (from Latin brevis, short or concise) is a liturgical book containing the public or canonical prayers, hymns, the Psalms, readings, and notations for everyday use, especially for priests, in the Divine Office (i. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Eastertide, or the Easter Season, begins on Easter Day and continues until Pentecost in the Christian liturgical calendar, thus spanning a total of seven weeks. ...


Orthodox Christians celebrate an additional Veneration of the Cross on the third Sunday of Great Lent. The services for this day are modelled on the Feast that falls on September 14, including bringing the cross out into the center of the church and its veneration by the faithful. Then, on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday of the Fourth Week of Great Lent, a Veneration of the Cross takes place at the First Hour (repeating a portion of the service from the All-night Vigil of the previous Sunday). Great Lent is the greatest fasting period in the church year in Eastern Christianity, which prepares Christians for the greatest feast of the church year, Easter (or Holy Pascha). Although it is in many ways similar to Lent in Western Christianity, there are important differences in the timing of Lent... Prime is a fixed time of prayer of the traditional Divine Office, said at 6 a. ... The All-Night Vigil (Russian: ), Opus 37, is an a cappella choral composition by Sergei Rachmaninoff, written and premiered in 1915. ...

  • Icon and Synaxarion

Wednesday and Friday

In addition to all of the above commemorations, Orthodox also hold Wednesday and Friday throughout the year as a commemoration of the Cross.


Veneration of the Cross

Feast Days

In the Eastern Orthodox Church, on several of the feast days metioned above, there is a public veneration of the cross. It may take place at Matins, after the cross is brought out, at the end of the celebration of the Divine Liturgy, or at the end of one of the Little Hours, depending upon the particular feast, and local custom. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Coptic Orthodox Pope · Roman Catholic Pope Archbishop of Canterbury · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Faith... For the Anglican service of Mattins see Morning Prayer Matins is the early morning prayer service in the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox liturgies of the canonical hours. ... The Divine Liturgy is the common term for the Eucharistic service of the Byzantine tradition of Christian liturgy. ... The Little Hours are the fixed daytime hours of prayer in the Liturgy of the Hours of the Roman Catholic Church. ...


The faithful come forward and make two prostrations, make the sign of the cross on themselves, and kiss the feet of Christ on the cross, and then make a third prostration. After this, they will often receive a blessing from the priest, and bow towards their fellow worshippers on each side of the church (this latter practice is most commonly observed in monasteries). Poyasny (little bow) and zemnoy poklon (great bow) are different kinds of bows used in an Eastern Orthodox worship service. ... For other uses, see Sign of the cross (disambiguation). ... Monastery of St. ...


End of Services

At the end of the Divine Liturgy, and at some other services as well, it is customary for the faithful to come forward and venerate the "Blessing Cross" (hand-cross) which is held by the bishop or priest, and to kiss his hand. This practice is also called the "Veneration of the Cross", though it does not involve making prostrations. The cross which is venerated is small (typically 10-16 inches). This cross is usually metal, often gold or gold-plated, and can be enameled and/or decorated with jewels. The figure of Jesus on the Cross (the soma) is usually engraved, enameled, or painted on the cross, rather than being a separate three-dimensional figure as is found on a crucifix. This is due to the Orthodox practice of using icons rather than statues in church. The Divine Liturgy is the common term for the Eucharistic service of the Byzantine tradition of Christian liturgy. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      This article is about a title... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... Plating is the general name surface-covering techniques in which a metal is deposited onto a conductive surface. ... In a discussion of art technology, enamel (or vitreous enamel, or porcelain enamel in American English) is the colorful result of fusion of powdered glass to a substrate through the process of firing, usually between 750 and 850 degrees Celsius. ... A selection of gemstone pebbles made by tumbling rough rock with abrasive grit, in a rotating drum. ... The Crucifix, a cross with corpus, a symbol used in Catholicism in contrast with some other Christian communions, which use only a cross. ... The Savior Not Made By Hands (1410s, by Andrei Rublev) An icon (from Greek εικων, eikon, image) is an artistic visual representation or symbol of anything considered holy and divine, such as God, saints or deities. ...


Notes

  1. ^ One-third remained in Jerusalem, one-third was brought to Rome and deposited in the Sessorian basilica Santa Croce in Gerusalemme (Holy Cross in Jerusalem), and one-third was taken back to Constantinople.
  2. ^ Mother Mary, Archimandrite Kallistos Ware (1969), The Festal Menaion, London: Faber and Faber, Ltd., pp. 154, ISBN 0-571-11137-8
  3. ^ Velimirovic, Bishop Nikolai (1985), "August 1: The Procession of the Honorable Cross", Prologue from Ochrid, vol. 4, Lazarica Press, ISBN 978-0948298028, <http://www.westsrbdio.org/prolog/my.html?month=August&day=1> (retrieved on 2007-08-14)

External links

  • "The True Cross" in the 1913 Catholic Encyclopedia.
  • The Elevation of the Venerable and Life-Giving Cross Greek Orthodox
  • Photo of Exaltation of the Cross by a Bishop in Russia

  Results from FactBites:
 
Feast of the Cross - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (888 words)
In 614, the part of the cross was carried away from the church by the Persians, and remained missing until it was recaptured by the Byzantine Emperor Heraclius in 628.
September 14 is the titular feast of the Congregation of Holy Cross.
The Elevation of the Venerable and Life-Giving Cross
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: The True Cross (3959 words)
The Good Friday ceremony of the Adoration of the Cross also had its origin in Jerusalem, as we have seen, and is a faithful reproduction of the rites of Adoration of the Cross of the fourth century in Jerusalem which have been described above, in accordance with the description of the author of the "Peregrinatio".
The cross is prepared before the altar; priests, deacons, subdeacons, clerics of the inferior grades, and lastly the people, each one comes in his turn; they salute the cross, during the singing of the anthem, "Ecce lignum crucis in quo salus mundi pependit.
It is probable that Gregory the Great was acquainted with this feast during his stay in Constantinople, and that the station of Santa Croce in Gerusalemme, on Lætare Sunday (the fourth Sunday in Lent), is a souvenir, or a timid effort at imitation, of the Byzantine solemnity.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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