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Encyclopedia > Fauvism
Henri Matisse, Portrait of Madame Matisse (The green line), 1905, Statens Museum for Kunst, Copenhagen, Denmark
Henri Matisse, Portrait of Madame Matisse (The green line), 1905, Statens Museum for Kunst, Copenhagen, Denmark
Henri Matisse, La Danse (second version), 1909 Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia
Henri Matisse, La Danse (second version), 1909 Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia
André Derain, Charing Cross Bridge, London, 1906
André Derain, Charing Cross Bridge, London, 1906

Les Fauves (French for The Wild Beasts) were a short-lived and loose grouping of early 20th century Modern artists whose works emphasized painterly qualities, and the imaginative use of deep color over the representational values retained by Impressionism. Fauvists simplified lines, made the subject of the painting easy to read and exaggerated perspectives. An interesting prescient prediction of the Fauves was expressed in 1888 by Paul Gauguin to Paul Sérusier, Image File history File links Matisse_-_Green_Line. ... Image File history File links Matisse_-_Green_Line. ... Henri Matisse (December 31, 1869 – November 3, 1954) was a French artist, noted for his use of color and his fluid, brilliant and original draughtsmanship. ... For other uses, see 1905 (disambiguation). ... Statens Museum for Kunst is the Danish national art museum situated in Copenhagen. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Matissedance. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Matissedance. ... Henri Matisse (December 31, 1869 – November 3, 1954) was a French artist, noted for his use of color and his fluid, brilliant and original draughtsmanship. ... Matisses second version of the painting. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The State Hermitage Museum (Russian: ) in Saint Petersburg, Russia is one of the largest museums in the world, with 3 million works of art (not all on display at once), [1] and one of the oldest art galleries and museums of human history and culture in the world. ... Saint Petersburg  listen (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991... Charing Cross Bridge, London (1906) by André Derain. ... Charing Cross Bridge, London (1906) by André Derain. ... Charing Cross Bridge, London (1906). ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Dejeuner sur lHerbe by Pablo Picasso At the Moulin Rouge: Two Women Waltzing by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, 1892 The Scream by Edvard Munch, 1893 I and the Village by Marc Chagall, 1911 Fountain by Marcel Duchamp, 1917 Campbells Soup Cans 1962 Synthetic polymer paint on thirty-two... Painterly is a literal translation of German Mälerisch, hence malerisch, one of the opposed categories popularized by the art historian Heinrich Wölfflin (1864 - 1945) in order to help focus, enrich and standardize the terms being used by art historians of his time to characterize works of art. ... This article is about the art movement. ... Eugène Henri Paul Gauguin (7 June 1848 – 8 May 1903) was a leading Post-Impressionist painter. ... Photo of Paul Sérusier Paul Sérusier (1864, Paris – 1927, Morlaix) was a post-impressionist French painter associated with the les Nabis artists. ...


"How do you see these trees? They are yellow. So, put in yellow; this shadow, rather blue, paint it with pure ultramarine; these red leaves? Put in vermilion." Natural ultramarine. ... Vermilion, also spelled vermillion, when found naturally-occurring, is an opaque reddish orange pigment, used since antiquity, originally derived from the powdered mineral cinnabar. ...

Contents

Les Fauves

The name was given,humorously and not as a compliment, to the group by art critic Louis Vauxcelles. The French word, "Fauves" means "wild beasts". Gustave Moreau was the movement's inspirational teacher; a professor at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris, and a Symbolist painter he pushed his students to think outside of the lines of formality and to follow their visions. Louis Vauxcelles (1870-?) was an influential French art critic. ... Self portrait of Gustav Moreau, 1850 Gustave Moreau (April 6, 1826 – April 18, 1898) was a French Symbolist painter. ... École des Beaux-Arts (IPA ) refers to several art schools in France. ... Symbolist painters were part of a 19th century movement in which art became infused with mysticism, and by the closely allied Symbolist movement in literature. ...


The leaders of the movement, Moreau's top students, were Henri Matisse and André Derain — friendly rivals of a sort, each with his own followers. The paintings, for example Matisse's 1909 La Danse or Derain's The Two Barges,[1] use powerful blues, oranges, reds or other forceful colors to draw the eye. Matisse became the yang to Picasso's yin in the 20th century while time has trapped Derain at the century's beginning, a "wild beast" forever. Their disciples included Albert Marquet, Charles Camoin, the Belgian painter Henri Evenepoel, Jean Puy, Maurice de Vlaminck, Raoul Dufy, Othon Friesz, Georges Rouault, the Dutch painter Kees van Dongen, the Swiss painter Alice Bailly and Picasso's partner in Cubism, Georges Braque. Henri Matisse (December 31, 1869 – November 3, 1954) was a French artist, noted for his use of color and his fluid, brilliant and original draughtsmanship. ... Charing Cross Bridge, London (1906). ... A young Pablo Picasso Pablo Picasso, formally Pablo Ruiz Picasso, (October 25, 1881 - April 8, 1973) was one of the recognized masters of 20th century art. ... Albert Marquet (27 March 1875, Bordeaux – 13 June 1947, Paris) was a French painter, associated with the Fauvism current. ... Charles Camoin was born in Marseilles, France in 1879. ... Maurice de Vlaminck (April 4, 1876 - October 11, 1958) was a French painter, print-maker and author. ... Raoul Dufy (June 3, 1877 – March 23, 1953) was a French Fauvist painter. ... [[Image:http://upload. ... Georges Henri Rouault (27 May 1871 – 13 February 1958) was a French Fauvist and Expressionist painter. ... Cornelis Theodorus Maria van Dongen (January 26, 1877 – May 28, 1968), was a Dutch painter born in Delfshaven, in the suburbs of Rotterdam, and is generally known as Kees van Dongen or just van Dongen. He was one of the les Fauves and gained a reputation for his sensuous, at... Alice Bailly (February 25, 1872 - January 1 1938) was a radical Swiss painter, know for her interpretation of cubism and her multimedia wool paintings. ... Pablo Picasso, Le guitariste, 1910 Juan Gris, Portrait of Picasso, 1912, oil on canvas Georges BraqueWoman with a guitar, 1913 Juan Gris, Still Life with Fruit Dish and Mandolin, 1919, oil on canvas Cubist villa in Prague, Czech Republic Cubist House of the Black Madonna, Prague, Czech Republic, 1912 Cubism... Violin and Candlestic --> -->, Paris, spring 1910, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art Georges Braque (May 13, 1882 – August 31, 1963) was a major 20th century French painter and sculptor who, along with Pablo Picasso, developed the art movement known as cubism. ...


Fauvism, as a movement, had no concrete theories, and was short lived, beginning in 1905 and ending in 1907, they only had three exhibitions. Matisse was seen as the leader of the movement, due to his seniority in age and prior self-establishment in the academic art world. He said he wanted to create art to delight; art as a decoration was his purpose and it can be said that his use of bright colors tries to maintain serenity of composition.


Among the influences of the movement were Paul Gauguin and Vincent van Gogh, both of whom had begun using colors in a brighter, more imaginative manner. The pointillism of Georges Seurat, and in particular Paul Signac, and the other Neo-impressionist painters and the work of Paul Cezanne were also central. Eugène Henri Paul Gauguin (7 June 1848 – 8 May 1903) was a leading Post-Impressionist painter. ... van Gogh redirects here. ... Le Chahut was painted by Seurat from 1889 to 1890. ... The Papal Palace, Avignon, oil on canvas, 1900 Paul Signac (November 11, 1863 - August 15, 1935) was a French neo-impressionist painter who, working with Georges Seurat, helped develop the pointillist style. ... Neo-Impressionism is a term coined by the French art critic Félix Fénéon in 1887[1] to characterise the late-19th century art movement led by Georges Seurat and Paul Signac, who first exhibited their work in 1884 at the exhibition of the Société des Artistes... Categories: 1839 births | 1906 deaths | French painters | Post-impressionism | Artist stubs ...

Maurice de Vlaminck, The River Seine at Chatou, 1906.
Maurice de Vlaminck, The River Seine at Chatou, 1906.
Henri Matisse, The Dessert: Harmony in Red, 1908: note use of red, intense colors of Fauvism.
Henri Matisse, The Dessert: Harmony in Red, 1908: note use of red, intense colors of Fauvism.

The River Seine at Chatou in Metropolitan Museum of Art. ... The River Seine at Chatou in Metropolitan Museum of Art. ... Maurice de Vlaminck (April 4, 1876 - October 11, 1958) was a French painter, print-maker and author. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

See also

This article is about the academic discipline of art history. ... Many times, the term art is used to refer to the visual arts. ... // The history of painting reaches back in time to artifacts from pre-historic humans, and spans all cultures. ... See also Western art, History of painting, History of art, Art history, Painting, Outline of painting history Jan Vermeer, Girl with a Pearl Earring, known as the Mona Lisa of the North 1665-1667 Édouard Manet, The Balcony 1868 The history of Western painting represents a continuous, though disrupted, tradition...

Further reading

  • William H. Gerdts (1995). The Color of Modernism: The American Fauves. New York: Hollis Taggart Galleries. 
  • Sarah Whitfield (1991). Fauvism. London: Thames And Hudson. 

External links



For Christian theological modernism, see Liberal Christianity and Modernism (Roman Catholicism). ... For Christian theological modernism, see Liberal Christianity and Modernism (Roman Catholicism). ... Modernity is a term used to describe the condition of being related to modernism. ... Modern history describes the history of the Modern Times, the era after the Middle Ages. ... Modernism in musicis characterized by a desire for or belief in progressand science, surrealism, anti-romanticism, politicaladvocacy, general intellectualism, and/or a breaking with tradition or common practice. ... Modernist literature is the literary form of Modernism and especially High modernism; it should not be confused with modern literature, which is the history of the modern novel and modern poetry as one. ... Mountebanks ... Dejeuner sur lHerbe by Pablo Picasso At the Moulin Rouge: Two Women Waltzing by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, 1892 The Scream by Edvard Munch, 1893 I and the Village by Marc Chagall, 1911 Fountain by Marcel Duchamp, 1917 Campbells Soup Cans 1962 Synthetic polymer paint on thirty-two... Modern dance is often performed in bare feet. ... Modern architecture, not to be confused with contemporary architecture, is a term given to a number of building styles with similar characteristics, primarily the simplification of form and the elimination of ornament. ... Romantics redirects here. ... Postmodernism is a term applied to a wide-ranging set of developments in critical theory, philosophy, architecture, art, literature, and culture, which are generally characterized as either emerging from, in reaction to, or superseding, modernism. ...

The above is a very narrow interpretation of fauvism

Fauvism should not just be seen as a school of painting but more generally as a philosophy.


In some senses fauvism was near the pinnacle of modernism, since the central tenet of the fauvism was essentially primitivism. In fact fauvism primitivism and futurism are all part of the same movement, and share a belief in abandoning or destroying the old and looking for new. Some of the most famous fauvist works involved art through destruction. Seeing war as art is one of the things most of us cant do now, but in the 1900's human life was often cheap and expendable. We should also mention the most famous 'Fauves', fauvism was a huge influence on Adolf Hitler and the whole philosophy of Nazism. The fauvist / futurist interpretation of Nazism is particularly uncomfortable though because it implies the possibility that Hitler actually chose the destruction of Germany as his goal right from the beginning. To build a war machine and ram it into bigger and bigger targets until it is destroyed is an inherently fauvist act. This is why they were called 'beasts'.


[My work and knowledge is very incomplete but this article is even more incomplete. - Needs a few authors who actually know about and understand modernism and art history. Like many histories to present only one version is systematically incorrect. - Lucien86]


  Results from FactBites:
 
fauvism (600 words)
It was the first specific artistic movement of the 20th century, that would transform European art between the turn of the century and World War I. The key figure of fauvism was Henri Matisse, other important members being Maurice de Vlaminck, Georges Braque, Georges Rouault, Raoul Dufy, and Derain.
Fauvism was not an official school with a manifesto, but a group of artists motivated by the same concerns.
Matisse continued to be concerned with the emotional use of colour, as seen in his later paper cut-outs, but Braque had a radical change of direction after meeting Picasso in 1907, going on to develop cubism with him.
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