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Encyclopedia > Fauna

Fauna is a collective term for animal life of any particular region or time. The corresponding term for plants is flora; the term which includes both fauna and flora is biota. Image File history File links Fauna. ... Phyla Subregnum Parazoa Porifera (sponges) Subregnum Agnotozoa Placozoa (trichoplax) Orthonectida (orthonectids) Rhombozoa (dicyemids) Subregnum Eumetazoa Radiata (unranked) (radial symmetry) Ctenophora (comb jellies) Cnidaria (coral, jellyfish, anemones) Bilateria (unranked) (bilateral symmetry) Acoelomorpha (basal) Orthonectida (parasitic to flatworms, echinoderms, etc. ... In Botany a Flora (or Floræ) is a collective term for plant life and can also refer to a descriptive catalogue of the plants of any geographical area, geological period, etc. ... Biota is the plant and animal life of a region or area. ...


Zoologists and paleontologists usually use fauna to refer to a typical collection of animals found in a specific time or place, e.g. the "Sonoran Desert fauna" or the "Burgess shale fauna". Zoology (Greek zoon = animal and logos = word) is the biological discipline which involves the study of animals. ... A paleontologist carefully chips rock from a column of dinosaur vertebrae. ... Sonoran Desert wildlife Mountains in the Sonoran Desert The Sonoran Desert (sometimes also called Gila Desert after Gila River) is a North American desert which straddles part of the U.S.-Mexico border and covers large parts of the U.S. states of Arizona and California and the Mexican state... The Burgess Shale (named after Mount Burgess, close to where the Shale was found) is a black shale exposure found high up in the Canadian Rockies in Yoho National Park near the town of Field, British Columbia. ...


Paleontologists sometimes refer to a sequence of 80 or so faunal stages, which are a series of rocks all containing similar fossils. Faunal stages are a subdivision of geologic time used primarily by paleontologists who study fossils rather than by geologists who study rock formations. ...


The name comes from Fauna, a Roman fertility and earth goddess. Fauna is also the name of a book that catalogues the animals in such a manner. The term was first used by Linnaeus in the title of his 1746 work Fauna Suecica. Fauna is an alternate name for Bona Dea, Ops, Terra and Tellus, ancient Roman goddesses. ... Carolus Linnaeus Carl Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as , (May 23, 1707 – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist[1] who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of nomenclature. ...

Contents


Subdivisions of fauna

Cryofauna

Cryofauna are animals that live in, or very close to, ice. Frozen Waterfall in the Rhön mountains A natural, 4 tonne, block of ice on a beach in Iceland Ice can refer to any of the 14 known solid phases of water. ...


Cryptofauna

Cryptofauna are animals that are rarely seen and may be extinct or mythological. In biology and ecology, extinction is the ceasing of existence of a species or group of taxa. ... The word mythology (Greek: μυθολογία, from μυθος mythos, a story or legend, and λογος logos, an account or speech) literally means the (oral) retelling of myths – stories that a particular culture believes to be true and that use supernatural events or characters to explain the nature of the universe and humanity. ...


Epifauna

Epifauna are non-photosynthetic, benthic organisms that live upon the surface of sediments or soils. Leaf. ... In marine geology and biology, benthos are the organisms and habitats of the sea floor; in freshwater biology they are the organisms and habitats of the bottoms of lakes, rivers, and creeks. ... In biology and ecology, an organism (in Greek organon = instrument) is a complex adaptive system of organs that influence each other in such a way that they function as a more or less stable whole and have properties of life. ... Sediment is any particulate matter that can be transported by fluid flow and which eventually is deposited as a layer of solid particles on the bed or bottom of a body of water or other liquid. ... Soil is material capable of supporting plant life. ...


Infauna

Infauna are aquatic organisms (usually animals, but sometimes algae) that live within particulate media such as sediments or soil. They are most common in the subtidal and deeper zones. Look up aquatic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A seaweed (Laurencia) up close: the branches are multicellular and only about 1 mm thick. ...


Macrofauna

Macrofauna are benthic or soil organisms which are at least several centimeters in length.


Megafauna

Main article: Megafauna

Megafauna are large animals of any particular region or time. For example, Australian megafauna. Megafauna are large animals of any particular region or time. ... Australian megafauna is a term used to describe a number of comparatively large animal species in Australia. ...


Meiofauna

Meiofauna are small benthic invertebrates that live in both marine and fresh water environments. The term Meiofauna loosely defines a group of organisms by their size, larger than microfauna but smaller than macrofauna, rather than a taxonomic grouping. In practice this are organisms that can pass through a 1 mm mesh but will be retained by a 45 μm mesh, but the exact dimensions will vary from researcher to researcher. Whether an organism will pass through a 1 mm mesh will also depend upon whether it is alive or dead at the time of sorting. Invertebrate is a term coined by Jean-Baptiste Lamarck to describe any animal without a spinal column. ... In biology and ecology, an organism (in Greek organon = instrument) is a complex adaptive system of organs that influence each other in such a way that they function as a more or less stable whole and have properties of life. ... A mesh is similar to fabric or a web in that it has many connected or weaved pieces. ...


Mesofauna

Mesofauna are macroscopic soil invertebrates such as arthropods, earthworms, and nematodes. Subphyla and Classes Subphylum Trilobitomorpha Trilobita - trilobites (extinct) Subphylum Chelicerata Arachnida - spiders,scorpions, etc. ... Families Suborder Haplotaxina   Haplotaxidae Suborder Moniligastrina   Moniligastridae Suborder Lumbricina   Alluroididae   Eudrilidae   Glossoscolecidae   Lumbricidae   Sparganophilidae   Acanthodrilidae   Octochaetidae   Exxidae   Megascolecidae   Microchaetidae   Eudrilidae Suborder Tubificina   Dorydrilidae   Enchytraeidae   Naididae   Opistocystidae   Phreodrilidae   Tubificidae Earthworm is the common name for the larger members of the Oligochaeta (which is either a class or subclass depending on the... Classes Adenophora    Subclass Enoplia    Subclass Chromadoria Secernentea    Subclass Rhabditia    Subclass Spiruria    Subclass Diplogasteria The roundworms (Phylum Nematoda) are one of the most common phyla of animals, with over 20,000 different described species. ...


Microfauna

Microfauna are microscopic or very small animals (usually including protozoans and very small animals such as rotifers. Wikisource has original 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica text related to: Protozoa Protozoa (in Greek proto = first and zoa = animal) are single-celled eukaryotes (organisms with nuclei) that show some characteristics usually associated with animals, most notably mobility and heterotrophy. ... Classes Seisonoidea Bdelloidea Monogononta The rotifers make up a phylum of microscopic, and near-microscopic pseudocoelomate animals. ...


Other terms include avifauna, which means "bird fauna" and piscifauna, which means "fish fauna". Orders Many - see section below. ... Atlantic herring, Clupea harengus: one of the most abundant species of fish in the world. ...


Fauna treatises

Classic Faunas

Carolus Linnaeus Carl Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as , (May 23, 1707 – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist[1] who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of nomenclature. ... // Events Catharine de Ricci (born 1522) canonized. ...

See also

Phyla Subregnum Parazoa Porifera (sponges) Subregnum Agnotozoa Placozoa (trichoplax) Orthonectida (orthonectids) Rhombozoa (dicyemids) Subregnum Eumetazoa Radiata (unranked) (radial symmetry) Ctenophora (comb jellies) Cnidaria (coral, jellyfish, anemones) Bilateria (unranked) (bilateral symmetry) Acoelomorpha (basal) Orthonectida (parasitic to flatworms, echinoderms, etc. ... In ecology, a biome is a major regional group of distinctive plant and animal communities best adapted to the regions physical natural environment, latitude, altitude and terrain factors. ... Flora may refer to: Flora (goddess), a goddess in Roman mythology Flora (plants), a collective term for plant life; as distinct from fauna (animals); or, a book or other work that describes the plant species occurring in a particular area or region. ...

References

External links

  • Fauna & Flora International
Look up fauna in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Fauna (46 words)
She is thought to be the wife, sister or daughter of Faunus.
Fauna is identified with Terra, Tellus or Ops.
Article "Fauna" created on 03 March 1997; last modified on 12 March 1997 (Revision 2).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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