FACTOID # 2: Puerto Rico has roughly the same gross state product as Montana, Wyoming and North Dakota combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Fatimid
Part of a series of articles on

Islam
Islam (Arabic:  ) is a monotheistic religion based upon the Quran, its principal scripture, whose followers, known as Muslims (مسلم), believe God (Arabic: الله ) sent through revelations to Muhammad. ...

History of Islam Islam (Arabic:  ) is a monotheistic religion based upon the Quran, its principal scripture, whose followers, known as Muslims (مسلم), believe God (Arabic: الله ) sent through revelations to Muhammad. ... Image File history File links Mosque02. ... The History of Islam involves the history of the Islamic faith as a religion and as a social institution. ...

Beliefs and practices

Oneness of God
Profession of Faith
PrayerFasting
CharityPilgrimage Aqidah, sometimes spelt as Aqeeda, Aqida or Aqeedah. ... TawÄ«d (also Tawheed,Tauheed and other spellings; Arabic: ‎ ; Turkish: Tevhid) is the Islamic concept of monotheism In Islam, TawhÄ«d means to assert the unity of God. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... The shahadah (Arabic:   translit: ) (Turkish: Åžehadet) is the Islamic creed. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This is a sub-article of Islamic economical jurisprudence. ... Arabic pronunciation The Hajj ( translit: ), (Turkish:Hac), (Malay:Haji) is the Pilgrimage to Mecca in Islam. ...

Major figures

Muhammad
Household of Muhammad
Prophets of Islam
Companions of Muhammad
This page is a list of Muslims in various professions and fields. ... This article is becoming very long. ... This is an Arabic phrase literally translated as People of the House, or family. ... Prophets of Islam are human beings who are regarded by Muslims to be prophets. ... In Islam, the Ṣaḥābah (Arabic: ‎ companions) were the companions of Muhammad. ...

Texts & Laws

Qur'anSunnahHadith
FiqhShariaTheology
// Quran Text Surahs Ayah Commentary/Exegesis Tafsir ibn Kathir (by Ibn Kathir) Tafsir al-Tabari (by Tabari) Al Kordobi Tafseer-e-kabir (by Imam Razi) Tafheem-al-Quran (by Maulana Maududi) Sunnah/Hadith Hadith (Traditions of The Prophet) The Siha-e-Sitta al-Bukhari (d. ... The Qurān [1] (Arabic: ‎ , literally the recitation; also called The Noble Quran; also transliterated as Quran, Koran, and Al-Quran), is the central religious text of Islam. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Hadith ( translit: ) are traditions relating to the words and deeds of Muhammad. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Sharia ( translit: ) refers to the body of Islamic law. ... Kalam (علم الكلم)is one of the religious sciences of Islam. ...

Major branches

SunniShi'a The religion of Islam has many divisions, sects, schools, traditions, and related faiths. ... Sunni Muslims are the largest denomination of Islam. ... Shia Islam, also Shiite Islam, or Shiism (Arabic:شيعة, Persian:شیعه translit: )is a denomination of the Islamic faith. ...

Societal aspects

AcademicsHistory
PhilosophyScience
ArtArchitecture • Cities
CalendarHolidaysWomen
LeadersPoliticsIslamism Muslim culture is a term primarily used in secular academia to describe all cultural practices common to historically Islamic peoples. ... Islamic Studies is the academic discipline which focuses on Islamic issues. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Islamic philosophy (الفلسفة الإسلامية) is a part of the Islamic studies, and is a longstanding attempt to create harmony between faith, reason or philosophy, and the religious teachings of Islam. ... This is a subarticle to Islamic studies and science. ... Islamic art is the art of Islamic people, cultures, and countries. ... the interior of the Selimiye Mosque in Edirne. ... // This is a list of cities that various groups regard as holy. ... The Islamic calendar or Muslim calendar (Arabic: التقويم الهجري; at-taqwīm al-hijrī; Persian: تقویم هجری قمری Gāhshomāri-ye Hejri; also called the Hijri calendar) is the calendar used to date events in many predominantly Muslim countries, and used by Muslims everywhere to determine the proper day on which to celebrate Islamic... Friday is an important day in the life of a Muslim and it is believed that any devotional acts done on this day gain a higher reward. ... Islam considers men and women to be equal by nature. ... Islamic religious leaders have traditionally been persons who, as part of the clerisy, mosque, or government, performed a prominent role within their community or nation. ... This article or section needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ... This article is about political Islamism. ...

See also

Vocabulary of Islam
The following list consists of concepts that are derived from both Islam and Arab tradition, which are expressed as words in the Arabic language. ...

This box: view  talk  edit


The Fatimids, Fatimid Caliphate or al-Fātimiyyūn (Arabic الفاطميون) is the Shi'a dynasty that ruled over varying areas of the Maghreb, Egypt, and the Levant from 5 January 910 to 1171. The term Fatimite is sometimes used to refer to the citizens of this caliphate. The ruling elite of the state belonged to the Ismaili branch of Shi'ism. The leaders of the dynasty were also Shia Ismaili Imams, hence, they had a religious significance to Ismaili Muslims. They are also part of the chain of holders of the office of Caliph, as recognized by most Muslims, the only period in which the Shia Imamate and the Caliphate were united to any degree. Shia Islam ( Arabic شيعى follower; English has traditionally used Shiite or Shiite) is the second largest Islamic denomination; some 20-25% of all Muslims are said to follow a Shia tradition. ... The Algerian bay (view from the west). ... January 5 is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Foundation of the Benedictine monastery of Cluny Chinese Zhou dynasty monarch 懿王 yi4 wang2 is succeeded by 孝王 xiao4 wang2 Hashavarman I succeeds Yasovarman I as ruler of the Khmer empire Gabriel I of Alexandria becomes Pope of the Coptic Orthodox Church Garcia I of Leon becomes... Events Saladin abolishes the Fatimid caliphate, restoring Sunni rule in Egypt. ... The IsmāʿīlÄ« (Urdu: اسماعیلی IsmāʿīlÄ«, Arabic: الإسماعيليون al-IsmāʿīliyyÅ«n; Persian: اسماعیلیان Esmāʿīliyān) branch of Islam is part of ShÄ«Ê¿a community after the Twelvers (Ithnāʿashariyya). ... After Jafar al-Sadiq (703-765), the Ismaili consept of Imamah differentiated from the mainstream twelvers conspect of Imamah. ... Caliph is the title for the Islamic leader of the Ummah, or community of Islam. ... Imam is an Arabic word meaning Leader. The ruler of a country might be called the Imam, for example. ... An Anglicized/Latinized version of the Arabic word خليفة or Khalīfah, Caliph (  listen?) is the term or title for the Islamic leader of the Ummah, or community of Islam. ...

Contents

The Rise of Fatimids

The Fatimids had their origins in what is modern Tunisia ("Ifriqiya") but after the conquest of Egypt about 970 CE, they relocated to a new capital, Cairo. In medieval history, Ifriqiya or Ifriqiyah (Arabic: إفريقية) was the area comprising the coastal regions of what are today western Libya, Tunisia, and eastern Algeria. ... Cairos location in Egypt Coordinates: Governor Dr. Abdul Azim Wazir Area    - City 210 km²  - Metro 1,492 km² Population    - City (2005) 7,438,376  - Density 35,420/km²  - Urban 10,834,495  - Metro 15,200,000 Time zone EET (UTC+2) EEST (UTC+3) Cairo (Arabic: ‎ translit: ), It comes...


Under the Fatimids, Egypt became the center of an empire that included at its peak North Africa, Sicily, Palestine, Syria, the Red Sea coast of Africa, Yemen and the Hejaz. Under the Fatimids, Egypt flourished and developed an extensive trade network in both the Mediterranean and the Indian Ocean, which eventually determined the economic course of Egypt during the High Middle Ages. What exactly constitutes an Empire (from the Latin imperium, denoting military command within the ancient Roman government) is a topic of intense debate within the scholarly community. ...  Northern Africa (UN subregion)  geographic, including above North Africa or Northern Africa is the northernmost region of the African continent. ... Sicily (Sicilia in Italian, Sicilian and Spanish, Σικελία in Greek) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,700 km² and 5 million inhabitants. ... Map of the British Mandate of Palestine. ... Location of the Red Sea Image:Red Seaimage. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Western Province (Saudi Arabia). ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... The cathedral Notre Dame de Paris, a significant architectural contribution of the High Middle Ages. ...


The dynasty was founded in 909 by ˤAbdullāh al-Mahdī Billa, who legitimised his claim through descent from the Prophet by way of the Prophet's daughter Fātima as-Zahra and her husband ˤAlī ibn-Abī-Tālib, the first Shīˤa Imām, hence the name al-Fātimiyyūn "Fatimid". This article is for the year 909. ... Ubayd Allah al-Mahdi Billah a. ... This article is becoming very long. ... This article is about Muhammads daughter. ... Ali ibn Abu Talib (Arabic: علي بن أبي طالب translit: ‘AlÄ« ibn Abu Ṭālib Persian: علی پسر ابو طالب) ‎ (599 – 661) is an early Islamic leader. ... Imam (Arabic: إمام ,Persian: امام ) is an Arabic word meaning leader. ...


Abdullāh al-Mahdi's control soon extended over all of central Maghreb, an area consisting of the modern countries of Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia and Libya, which he ruled from Mahdia, his newly-built capital in Tunisia. The Algerian bay (view from the west). ... Mahdia, Arabic: المهدية (al-Mahdiya), is a Tunisian coastal city with 37,000 inhabitants, south of Monastir and southeast of Sousse. ...


The Fatimids entered Egypt in 972, conquering the Ikhshidid dynasty and founding a new capital at al-Qāhirat "The Subduer" (modern Cairo)- a reference to the appearance of the planet Mars. They continued to conquer the surrounding areas until they ruled from Tunisia to Syria and even crossed over into Sicily and southern Italy. Events Otto II marries Theophanu, Byzantine princess. ... The Ikhshidid dynasty of Egypt (sometimes transliterated other ways) ruled Egypt from 935 to 969. ... Cairos location in Egypt Coordinates: Governor Dr. Abdul Azim Wazir Area    - City 210 km²  - Metro 1,492 km² Population    - City (2005) 7,438,376  - Density 35,420/km²  - Urban 10,834,495  - Metro 15,200,000 Time zone EET (UTC+2) EEST (UTC+3) Cairo (Arabic: ‎ translit: ), It comes... Sicily (Sicilia in Italian, Sicilian and Spanish, Σικελία in Greek) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,700 km² and 5 million inhabitants. ...


Unlike other governments in the area, Fatimid advancement in state offices was based more on merit than on heredity. Members of other branches of Islām, like the Sunnis, were just as likely to be appointed to government posts as Shiites. Tolerance was extended even to non-Muslims such as Christians and Jews, who occupied high levels in government based solely on ability (exceptions to this general attitude of tolerance include the "Mad Caliph" Al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah). OFFICE WORK IS SHITE!! NEVER WORK IN ONE! end of. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... Heredity (the adjective is hereditary) is the transfer of characteristics from parent to offspring, either through their genes or through the social institution called inheritance (for example, a title of nobility is passed from individual to individual according to relevant customs and/or laws). ... Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... A Christian is a follower of Jesus of Nazareth, referred to as the Christ. ... Hakim bi-Amr Allah (literally: Ruler by Gods Command), known as the Mad Caliph, was the sixth Fatimid Caliph in Egypt, ruling from 996 to 1021. ...


Decay and Fall

In the 1040s, the Zirids (governors of North Africa under the Fatimids) declared their independence from the Fatimids and their conversion to "orthodox" Sunnī Islām, which led to the devastating Banū Hilal invasions. After about 1070, the Fatimid hold on the Levant coast and parts of Syria was challenged by first Turkish invasions, then the Crusades, so that Fatimid territory shrunk until it consisted only of Egypt. Centuries: 10th century - 11th century - 12th century Decades: 990s - 1000s - 1010s - 1020s - 1030s - 1040s - 1050s - 1060s - 1070s - 1080s - 1090s 1039 1040 1041 1042 1043 1044 1045 1046 1047 1048 1049 1050 Significant people King Macbeth of Scotland (d. ... The Zirids were a Berber dynasty, originating in Petite Kabylie among the Kutama tribe, that ruled Ifriqiya (roughly, modern Tunisia), initially on behalf of the Fatimids, for about two centuries, until weakened by the Banu Hilal and finally destroyed by the Almohads. ... The Banu Hilal were an Arab tribe that migrated from Arabia into North Africa in the 11th century, having been sent by the Fatimids to punish the Zirids for abandoning Shiism. ... Events Hereward the Wake begins a Saxon revolt in the Fens of eastern England. ... The Levant Levant is an imprecise geographical term historically referring to a large area in the Middle East south of the Taurus Mountains, bounded by the Mediterranean Sea on the west, and by the northern Arabian Desert and Upper Mesopotamia to the east. ... The Crusades were a series of military campaigns conducted in the name of Christendom[1] and usually sanctioned by the Pope. ...


After the decay of the Fatimid political system in the 1160s, the Zengid ruler Nūr ad-Dīn had his general, Saladin, seize Egypt in 1169, forming the Sunni Ayyubid Dynasty. The Zengid Dynasty was a Muslim dynasty of Seljuk Turkish origin, which ruled parts of Northern Iraq and Syria during the 12th and 13th centuries. ... al-Malik al-Adil Nur ad-Din Abu al-Qasim Mahmud Ibn Imad ad-Din Zangi (1118 – May 15, 1174), also known as Nur ed-Din, Nur al-Din, etc. ... Artistic representation of Saladin (1137 - March 4, 1193), Kurdish: Selahedîn Ayûbî; ; Saladin or Salah el Din, (Arabic: صلاح الدين الأيوبي, Kurdish: صلاح الدین ایوبی) (c. ... Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... The Ayyubid Dynasty was a Muslim dynasty of Kurdish origins which ruled Egypt, Syria, Yemen, Diyar Bakr, Mecca, Hejaz and northern Iraq or Iraqi Kurdistan in the 12th and 13th centuries. ...


Fatimid Imāms

The word "Imām" as used in Shīˤa Islām means a hereditary leader of the Muslim community in the direct line of ˤAlī ibn-Abī-Tālib. Shiʻa Islam (Arabic شيعى follower; English has traditionally used Shiite) makes up the second largest sect of believers in Islam, constituting about 30%–35% of all Muslim. ... Ali ibn Abu Talib (Arabic: علي بن أبي طالب translit: ‘AlÄ« ibn Abu Ṭālib Persian: علی پسر ابو طالب) ‎ (599 – 661) is an early Islamic leader. ...

  1. Abū Muḥammad ˤAbdu l-Lāh (ˤUbaydu l-Lāh) al-Mahdī bi'llāh (910-934) founder Fatimid dynasty
  2. Abū l-Qāsim Muḥammad al-Qā'im bi-Amr Allāh (934-946)
  3. Abū Ṭāhir Ismā'il al-Manṣūr bi-llāh (946-953)
  4. Abū Tamīm Ma'add al-Mu'izz li-Dīn Allāh}} (953-975) Egypt is conquered during his reign
  5. Abū Manṣūr Nizār al-'Azīz bi-llāh (975-996)
  6. Abū 'Alī al-Manṣūr al-Ḥākim bi-Amr Allāh (996-1021)
  7. Abū'l-Ḥasan 'Alī al-Ẓāhir li-I'zāz Dīn Allāh (1021-1036)
  8. Abū Tamīm Ma'add al-Mustanṣir bi-llāh (1036-1094)
  9. al-Musta'lī bi-llāh (1094-1101) Quarrels over his succession led to the Nizari split.
  10. al-Āmir bi-Aḥkām Allāh (1101-1130) The Fatimid rulers of Egypt after him are not recognized as Imams by Mustaali Taiyabi Ismailis.
  11. 'Abd al-Majīd al-Ḥāfiẓ (1130-1149)
  12. al-Ẓāfir (1149-1154)
  13. al-Fā'iz (1154-1160)
  14. al-'Āḍid (1160-1171)

Ubayd Allah al-Mahdi Billah a. ... Events Foundation of the Benedictine monastery of Cluny Chinese Zhou dynasty monarch 懿王 yi4 wang2 is succeeded by 孝王 xiao4 wang2 Hashavarman I succeeds Yasovarman I as ruler of the Khmer empire Gabriel I of Alexandria becomes Pope of the Coptic Orthodox Church Garcia I of Leon becomes... Events The Goryeo army defeats Hubaekje forces in present-day Hongseong County. ... Imam Muhammad al-Qaim Bi-Amrillah (893 - 17 May 946) was the second Caliph of the Fatimids in Ifriqiya and ruled from 934 to 946. ... Events The Goryeo army defeats Hubaekje forces in present-day Hongseong County. ... Events Eadred I succeeds his brother as king of England End of the reign of Emperor Suzaku of Japan Emperor Murakami ascends the throne of Japan Births Deaths May 26 - King Edmund I of England Abu-Bakr Muhammad ben Yahya as-Suli Categories: 946 ... Isma`îl al-Mansûr (b. ... Events Eadred I succeeds his brother as king of England End of the reign of Emperor Suzaku of Japan Emperor Murakami ascends the throne of Japan Births Deaths May 26 - King Edmund I of England Abu-Bakr Muhammad ben Yahya as-Suli Categories: 946 ... Events First time that Póvoa de Varzim, Portugal appeared in a Roman map. ... Was the fourth Fatamid caliph. ... Events First time that Póvoa de Varzim, Portugal appeared in a Roman map. ... Events Coronation of King Edward the Martyr Births Deaths July 8 Edgar of England Categories: 975 ... Al-Aziz (* 955; † 996) was the fifth Caliph of the Fatimids (975-996). ... Events Coronation of King Edward the Martyr Births Deaths July 8 Edgar of England Categories: 975 ... Events March/April - Pope John XV dies before being being able to coronate Otto III, King of Germany as Holy Roman Emperor. ... Hakim bi-Amr Allah (literally: Ruler by Gods Command), known as the Mad Caliph, was the sixth Fatimid Caliph in Egypt, ruling from 996 to 1021. ... Events March/April - Pope John XV dies before being being able to coronate Otto III, King of Germany as Holy Roman Emperor. ... // Events Al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah, sixth Fatimid Caliph of Egypt disappears on a trip to al-Muqattam hills. ... ˤAlÄ« az-Zāhir (20 June 1005 – 13 June 1036) (Arabic: الظاهر بالله) was the Seventh Caliph of the Fātimids (1021 - 1036). ... // Events Al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah, sixth Fatimid Caliph of Egypt disappears on a trip to al-Muqattam hills. ... Events Emperor Go-Suzaku ascends the throne of Japan. ... Al-Mustansir (Arabic: المستنصر) ‎ (July 2, 1029 – January 10, 1094), was born in Cairo on 16th Jamada II, 420/ and eight months afterwards was declared to succeed his father. ... Events Emperor Go-Suzaku ascends the throne of Japan. ... // Events May - El Cid completes his Christian reconquest of Valencia, Spain from the Muslims. ... Ahmad al-Mustali (Arabic: احمد المستعلى) (d 1101) was the ninth Fatimid Caliph. ... // Events May - El Cid completes his Christian reconquest of Valencia, Spain from the Muslims. ... Events A second wave of crusaders arrives in the newly established Kingdom of Jerusalem, after being heavily defeated by Kilij Arslan I at Heraclia. ... A sub-sect of the Sevener Shia Muslim Ismaili sect. ... Mansur al-Amir Bi-Ahkamillah is the 20th Fatimid Imam. ... Events A second wave of crusaders arrives in the newly established Kingdom of Jerusalem, after being heavily defeated by Kilij Arslan I at Heraclia. ... Events February 13 - Innocent II is elected pope An antipope schism occurs when Roger II of Sicily supports Anacletus II as pope instead of Innocent II. Innocent flees to France and Anacletus crowns Roger King. ... This group is named Mustaali because they follow Imam Mustalli, after Imam Mustansir Billah, and not Nazaar whom the Aga Khan group consider as their Imam. ... Al-Hafiz (d. ... Events February 13 - Innocent II is elected pope An antipope schism occurs when Roger II of Sicily supports Anacletus II as pope instead of Innocent II. Innocent flees to France and Anacletus crowns Roger King. ... Events Castle of Carimate destroyed. ... Al-Zafir was a Fatimids imam and caliph from 1149 to 1154, in Cairo (Mustali Tayyebis do not consider him as an Imam). ... Events Castle of Carimate destroyed. ... Events King Stephen of England dies at Dover, and is succeeded by his adopted son Henry Plantagenet who becomes King Henry II of England, aged 21. ... Al-Faiz (b. ... Events King Stephen of England dies at Dover, and is succeeded by his adopted son Henry Plantagenet who becomes King Henry II of England, aged 21. ... Events Eric IX of Sweden is succeeded by Karl Sverkersson. ... Al-Āḍid (b. ... Events Eric IX of Sweden is succeeded by Karl Sverkersson. ... Events Saladin abolishes the Fatimid caliphate, restoring Sunni rule in Egypt. ...

Links

  • Fatimids entry in the Encyclopaedia of the Orient.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Fatimid. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05 (445 words)
In doctrine the Fatimids were related to other Shiite sects.
In the reign (953–75) of the 4th caliph, Moizz, Fatimid fortunes reached their height.
In 1171 Adid, the 14th and last of the Fatimid rulers, died.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m