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Encyclopedia > Fast casual

There are various types of restaurants. Restaurants can be classified by whether they provide places to sit, whether they are served by wait-staff and the quality of the service, the formality of the atmosphere, and the price range. A typical restaurant in uptown Manhattan A restaurant is an establishment that serves prepared food and beverages to be consumed on the premises. ... A waiter in a resort setting A waiter is one who waits on tables, often at a restaurant or a bar. ...


Historically, restaurant referred only to places which provide tables where one sits down to eat the meal, typically served by wait-staff. Following the rise of fast food and take-out restaurants, a retronym for the older "standard" restaurant was created, sit-down restaurant. Most commonly, "sit-down restaurant" refers to a casual dining restaurant with table service rather than a fast-food restaurant where one orders food at a counter. Sit-down restaurants are often further categorized as "family-style" or "formal". A waiter in a resort setting A waiter is one who waits on tables, often at a restaurant or a bar. ... Fast food is food prepared and served quickly at a fast-food restaurant or shop at low cost. ... Take-out, carry-out ( in American English ) or take-away ( in British English ) is food purchased at a restaurant but eaten elsewhere. ... A retronym is a type of neologism coined for an old object or concept whose original name has come to be used for something else or is no longer unique. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A waiter in a resort setting A waiter is one who waits on tables, often at a restaurant or a bar. ... A fast-food restaurant is a restaurant characterized both by food which is supplied quickly after ordering, and by minimal service. ...


In British English, the term "restaurant" almost always means an eating establishment with table service, so the "sit-down" qualification is not usually necessary. Fast food and takeaway (takeout) outlets with counter service are not normally referred to as restaurants. Diagram showing the geographical locations of selected languages and dialects of the British Isles. ...

Contents

Fast food restaurants

Main article: Fast-food restaurant

In the U.S., fast-food restaurants and take-outs have become so widespread that the traditional standard type is now sometimes referred to as a sit-down restaurant (a retronym). A common feature of fast food restaurants is a lack of cutlery or crockery, the customer is expected to eat the food directly from the disposable container it was served in using their hands. A fast-food restaurant is a restaurant characterized both by food which is supplied quickly after ordering, and by minimal service. ... Take-out, carry-out ( in American English ) or take-away ( in British English ) is food purchased at a restaurant but eaten elsewhere. ... A sit-down restaurant is simply a restaurant that caters to customers who plan to sit down and be served by waitstaff. ... A retronym is a type of neologism coined for an old object or concept whose original name has come to be used for something else or is no longer unique. ... Starch-polyester disposable cutlery Cutlery refers to any hand utensil used in preparing, serving, and especially eating food. ... Some dishware Dishware is a general term for objects—dishes—from which people eat or serve food, such as plates and bowls. ...


There are various types of fast-food restaurant:

  • one collects food from a counter and pays, then sits down and starts eating (self-service restaurant); sub-varieties:
    • one collects ready portions
    • one serves oneself from containers
    • one is served at the counter
      • a special procedure is that one first pays at the cash desk, collects a ticket and then goes to the food counter, where one gets the food in exchange for the ticket
  • one orders at the counter; after preparation the food is brought to one's table; paying may be on ordering or after eating.

Family style

"Family style", or sometimes called table d’hôte ("host's table") in France, are restaurants that have a fixed menu and fixed price, usually with diners seated at a communal table such as on bench seats. More common in the 19th and early 20th century, they can still be found in rural communities, or as theme restaurants, or in vacation lodges. There is no menu to choose from, rather food is brought out in courses, usually with communal serving dishes, like at a family meal. Typical examples can include crab-houses, German-style beer halls, BBQ restaurants, hunting/fishing lodges. Some normal restaurants will mix elements of family style, such as a table salad or bread bowl that is included as part of the meal.


Casual dining

See List of casual dining restaurant chains.

A casual dining restaurant is a restaurant that serves moderately-priced food in a casual atmosphere. Except for buffet-style restaurants, casual dining restaurants typically provide table service. Casual dining comprises a market segment between fast food establishments and fine dining restaurants (see also Fast casual restaurant). In the United States, the bill per diner at a casual dining restaurant usually averages $10 - $30 for an evening meal and slightly less for lunch, as of 2004. A casual dining restaurant is a restaurant that serves moderately-priced food in a casual atmosphere. ... Toms Restaurant, a restaurant in New York made familiar by Suzanne Vega and the television sitcom Seinfeld A restaurant is an establishment that serves prepared food and beverages to order, to be consumed on the premises. ... A Chinese buffet restaurant in the U.S. A buffet (buh-FAY or /bə.ˈfei/) is a meal-serving system where patrons serve themselves. ... A waiter in a resort setting A waiter is one who waits on tables, often at a restaurant or a bar. ... Fast food is food prepared and served quickly at a fast-food restaurant or shop at low cost. ... Fine dining is often used to describe a restaurant that creates a dining experience. ... A fast casual restaurant is a type of restaurant which is similar to a fast-food restaurant in that it does not offer full table service, but promises a somewhat higher quality of food and atmosphere. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Casual Dining versus Family Restaurant

Some casual dining restaurants serve beer or wine with meals or include a bar where alcoholic beverages are served, but they are generally distinct from drinking establishments. A casual dining restaurant that does not serve alcohol is often referred to as a family restaurant. A selection of bottled beers A selection of cask beers Beer is the worlds oldest [1] and most popular [2] alcoholic beverage, selling more than 133 billion litres (35 billion gallons) per year. ... This article is about the alcoholic beverage. ... A bar at the coach terminal, Udine, Italy A bar is the counter where drinks are mixed by a bartender, mainly in hotels, taverns and pubs. ... Bottles of cachaça, a Brazilian alcoholic beverage. ... Tourists sit outside a bar in Chiang Mai, Thailand A Depression-era bar in Louisiana. ... A casual dining restaurant is a restaurant that serves moderately-priced food in a casual atmosphere. ...


Fine Dining

Fine dining is a phrase used to describe restaurants that create a serious dining experience. The experience can start with the location and the view. The interior of such restaurants is often purported to be quite elegant and designed in accordance with the restaurant's concept. Service attempts to be impeccable, with chefs and service crew typically hailing from the best culinary schools. Toms Restaurant, a restaurant in New York made familiar by Suzanne Vega and the television sitcom Seinfeld A restaurant is an establishment that serves prepared food and beverages to order, to be consumed on the premises. ... Elegance is the attribute of being tastefully designed or decorated, with focus on basic features. ... For other senses of this word, see chef (disambiguation). ... A cooking school or culinary school is an institution devoted to education in the art and science of food preparation. ...


Restaurants fitting the fine dining label are normally highly rated; in the four star range and will provide more nuanced service and more expensive food than a standard sit-down restaurant. The 4-star Manor House Hotel at Castle Combe, Wiltshire, England. ... A sit-down restaurant is simply a restaurant that caters to customers who plan to sit down and be served by waitstaff. ...


Fast casual dining

See List of fast casual dining restaurants.

A fast casual restaurant is a type of restaurant which is similar to a fast-food restaurant in that it does not offer full table service, but promises a somewhat higher quality of food and atmosphere. It is a growing concept to fill the space between fast-food and casual dining. The typical cost per guest is in the $6-$10 range. A fast casual restaurant is a type of restaurant which is similar to a fast-food restaurant in that it does not offer full table service, but promises a somewhat higher quality of food and atmosphere. ... A fast-food restaurant is a restaurant characterized both by food which is supplied quickly after ordering, and by minimal service. ... Table service is a form of service in restaurants, pubs, and bars where food or drinks are served to the customers table. ... // A fast-food restaurant is a restaurant characterized both by food ready to eat quickly after ordering, and by minimal service. ... A casual dining restaurant is a restaurant that serves moderately-priced food in a casual atmosphere. ...


Counter service accompanied by handmade food (often visible via an open kitchen) is typical. Alcohol may be served. Dishes like steak, which require experience on the part of the cook to get right, may be offered. The menu is usually limited to an extended over-counter display, and options in the way the food is prepared are emphasized. Health-conscious items have a larger than normal portion of the menu, and some restaurants may emphasize high quality ingredients like free range chicken and freshly made salsas; Overall, the quality of the food is presented as much higher than conventional factory-made fast food. While full table service is not offered, conveniences like non-plastic utensils and plates are common.


The moderate volume music and nontraditional decor pioneered by Starbucks are fully embraced by fast casual restaurants - approximately half of the customers eat in the establishment, compared with a quarter of fast food customers.


Technomic Information Services created the term "fast casual restaurants" to describe restaurants with the following classifications:

  • Limited-service or self-service format
  • Average check between $6 and $9
  • Made-to-order food with more complex flavors than fast food restaurants
  • Upscale or highly developed decor

There is a Fast Casual Magazine, launched by NetWorld Alliance and published by Paul Barron, who coined the term "Fast Casual" in the late 1990s[1].


Brasserie, bistro, pub

In France, a brasserie is a café doubling as a restaurant and serving single dishes and other meals in a relaxed setting. A bistro is a familiar name for a café serving moderately priced simple meals in an unpretentious setting, especially in Paris; bistros have become increasingly popular with tourists. Mainly in the UK and other countries influenced by British culture, the pub (short for public house) today serves a similar dual menu, offering beer and other alcohol along with basic food fare. Traditionally, pubs were primarily drinking establishments, whereas the modern pub business relies on food as well, to the point where gastropubs are known for their high-quality "pub food". A Street Cafe, Jerusalem, Henry Fenn (1838- ): steel engraving in Picturesque Palestine, ca 1875 A coffeehouse, coffee shop, or café shares some of the characteristics of a bar, and some of the characteristics of a restaurant. ... Coffeehouse in Damascus A coffeehouse, coffee shop, or café shares some of the characteristics of a bar, and some of the characteristics of a restaurant. ... A bistro is a familiar name for a café serving moderately priced simple meals in an unpretentious setting, especially in Paris. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... An amusingly named pub (the Old New Inn) at Bourton-on-the-Water, in the Cotswold Hills of South West England A pub in the Haymarket area of Edinburgh, Scotland A public house, usually known as a pub, is a drinking establishment found mainly in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada... A gastropub is a British term for a public house (pub) which specializes in high-quality food a step above the more basic pub grub. The name is derived from gastronomy and was coined in 1991 when David Eyre and Mike Belben opened a pub called The Eagle in Clerkenwell...


Dining car

Main article: Dining car
An interior view of a Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad dining car, circa 1927.
An interior view of a Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad dining car, circa 1927.

A dining car (British English: restaurant car) or diner (but not "diner car," except in uninformed parlance) is a railroad passenger car that serves meals on a train in the manner of a full-service, sit-down restaurant. It is distinct from other types of railroad food-service cars that do not duplicate the full-service restaurant experience, principally cars of various types in which one purchases food from a walk-up counter to be consumed either within the car or elsewhere in the train. While dining cars are less common today than they were in the past, they still play a significant role in passenger railroading, especially on medium- and long-distance trains. A typical restaurant in uptown Manhattan A restaurant is an establishment that serves prepared food and beverages to be consumed on the premises. ... Image File history File links The interior of a Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad dining car circa 1927. ... Image File history File links The interior of a Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad dining car circa 1927. ... The Denver and Rio Grande Railroad (AAR reporting mark DRG and DRGW) generally referred to as the Rio Grande, became the Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad in 1920, and is today a fallen flag (a railroad that has been absorbed into a larger system -- Union Pacific -- as the result... Restored passenger cars on display at the Mid-Continent Railway Museum in North Freedom, WI. A passenger car is a piece of railroad rolling stock that is designed to carry passengers. ... A typical North American steam train In rail transport, a train consists of rail vehicles that move along guides to transport freight or passengers from one place to another. ...


References

  1. ^ "NetWorld Alliance Launches Fast Casual Magazine" from The Write News

 
 

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