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Encyclopedia > Fast Times at Ridgemont High
Fast Times at Ridgemont High

Original movie poster.
Directed by Amy Heckerling
Produced by Irving Azoff
Art Linson
Written by Cameron Crowe
Starring Sean Penn
Jennifer Jason Leigh
Judge Reinhold
Phoebe Cates
Brian Backer
Robert Romanus
Ray Walston
Forest Whitaker
Cinematography Matthew F. Leonetti
Editing by Eric Jenkins
Distributed by Universal Pictures
Release date(s) August 13, 1982
Running time 90 min.
Country Flag of the United States United States
Language English, Italian, Afrikaans
Budget $4,500,000 (estimated)
Gross revenue $27,092,880 (USA) (sub-total)
All Movie Guide profile
IMDb profile

Fast Times at Ridgemont High is a 1982 American coming-of-age teen-comedy film written by Cameron Crowe (adapted from his book) and directed by Amy Heckerling. The film follows a school year in the lives of freshman Stacy Hamilton (Jennifer Jason Leigh), freshman Mark Ratner (Brian Backer) and their respective friends Linda Barrett (Phoebe Cates) and Mike Damone (Robert Romanus) who believe themselves wise in the ways of romance and counsel their younger counterparts. The ensemble cast of characters also includes Jeff Spicoli (Sean Penn), a perpetually stoned surfer who faces off against uptight history teacher Mr. Hand (Ray Walston), who is convinced that all of his students smoke marijuana. Stacy's brother, Brad (Judge Reinhold), is a popular senior who works at a local burger joint. Ridgemont High School is an Ottawa-Carleton District School Board secondary school in Ottawa, Canada. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 389 × 599 pixels Full resolution (400 × 616 pixel, file size: 93 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Fast Times at Ridgemont High This image is of a poster, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher or... Amy Heckerling (born May 7, 1954) is an American film director, one of the few women directors to have produced multiple box-office hits. ... Irving Azoff is a famous music industry manager of bands such as Jewel, The Eagles, Bush, REO Speedwagon, Dan Fogelberg, Seal, Journey, Christina Aguilera, Van Halen and Steely Dan. ... Art Linson (b. ... Cameron Bruce Crowe (born July 13, 1957) is an Academy Award winning American writer and film director. ... Sean Justin Penn (born August 17, 1960) // Penn was born in Santa Monica, California, the son of Leo Penn, an actor and director, and Eileen Ryan (née Annucci), an actress. ... Jennifer Jason Leigh (born February 5, 1962) is an American actress who has appeared in numerous films. ... Judge Reinhold is the stage name of Edward Ernest Reinhold, Jr. ... Phoebe Cates (born on July 16, 1963) is an American film actress known for her roles in several teen films, most notably Fast Times at Ridgemont High and Gremlins. ... Brian Backer (b. ... Robert Romanus (b. ... Ray Walston (December 2, 1914 – January 1, 2001) was a stage, television and feature film character actor who played the title character on the situation comedy My Favorite Martian and Judge Henry Bone on the drama series Picket Fences. ... Forest Steven Whitaker (born July 15, 1961) is an American actor, producer, and director. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ... Universal Pictures is the main motion picture production/distribution arm of Universal Studios, a subsidiary of NBC Universal. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Afrikaans is a West Germanic language mainly spoken in South Africa and Namibia. ... // This is the year of film E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, which will become the highest grossing movie for almost 15 years (until Titanic), earning double or triple against any major film of the 1980s. ... For other uses, see Coming of Age (disambiguation). ... The teen film (also called teen movie or teenpic) is a film genre in which the plot is based upon the special interests of teenagers, such as coming of age, first love, rebellion, conflict with parents, teen angst and alienation. ... Comedy film is genre of film in which the main emphasis is on humor. ... Cameron Bruce Crowe (born July 13, 1957) is an Academy Award winning American writer and film director. ... Amy Heckerling (born May 7, 1954) is an American film director, one of the few women directors to have produced multiple box-office hits. ... Jennifer Jason Leigh (born February 5, 1962) is an American actress who has appeared in numerous films. ... Brian Backer (b. ... Phoebe Cates (born on July 16, 1963) is an American film actress known for her roles in several teen films, most notably Fast Times at Ridgemont High and Gremlins. ... Robert Romanus (b. ... Sean Justin Penn (born August 17, 1960) // Penn was born in Santa Monica, California, the son of Leo Penn, an actor and director, and Eileen Ryan (née Annucci), an actress. ... See World Wide Web for surfing the web; see also Wind surfing Surfing at Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. ... Ray Walston (December 2, 1914 – January 1, 2001) was a stage, television and feature film character actor who played the title character on the situation comedy My Favorite Martian and Judge Henry Bone on the drama series Picket Fences. ... Cannabis, also known as marijuana[1] or ganja (Hindi: गांजा),[2] is a psychoactive product of the plant Cannabis sativa. ... Judge Reinhold is the stage name of Edward Ernest Reinhold, Jr. ...


It includes early appearances by several actors who would later become stars, including Sean Penn, Eric Stoltz, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Nicolas Cage, Anthony Edwards, Forest Whitaker, and Judge Reinhold. Notably, three of the actors who appeared in the film — Cage, Penn, and Whitaker — would win an Academy Award for Best Actor later on in their careers. Sean Justin Penn (born August 17, 1960) // Penn was born in Santa Monica, California, the son of Leo Penn, an actor and director, and Eileen Ryan (née Annucci), an actress. ... Eric H. Stoltz (born September 30, 1961) is a Golden Globe-nominated American actor. ... Jennifer Jason Leigh (born February 5, 1962) is an American actress who has appeared in numerous films. ... Nicolas Cage (born January 7, 1964) is an Academy Award-winning American actor. ... This article is about the American actor. ... Forest Steven Whitaker (born July 15, 1961) is an American actor, producer, and director. ... Judge Reinhold is the stage name of Edward Ernest Reinhold, Jr. ... The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role is one of the awards given to actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ...


Crowe himself would soon become a celebrated Hollywood director and screenwriter, eventually winning an Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay for his movie Almost Famous. The Academy Award for Writing Original Screenplay is the Academy Award for the best script not based upon previously published material. ... Almost Famous is a 2000 American film written and directed by Cameron Crowe. ...


Several scenes have entered pop culture, the most famous[citation needed] of which is a fantasy sequence in which Cates exits a pool and removes her bright red bikini top in slow motion to the beat of The Cars' "Moving in Stereo." A dream sequence is a technique used in storytelling, particularly in television and film, to set apart a brief interlude from the main story. ... This article is about the womens bathing suit. ... The Cars were an American rock band, fronted by Ric Ocasek, that emerged from the early punk scene in the late 1970s. ... Moving in Stereo is a song from The Cars on their self-titled debut album. ...

Contents

Plot

Stacy Hamilton (Leigh) is a high school freshman who works at a pizza restaurant with the more sexually experienced Linda Barrett (Cates). Mark Ratner (Backer) also works in the mall, as "assistant to the assistant manager" of the movie theater. His friend Mike Damone (Romanus) — who also hangs out at the mall scalping rock concert tickets — believes himself to be both worldly and wise in the ways of women. Stacy's brother Brad (Reinhold) is a popular senior who saved enough from his long-time gig at All-American Burger to buy a blue 1960 Buick LeSabre.[1] Partier Jeff Spicoli (Penn) hotboxes in a Volkswagen Microbus before the final bell rings for the start of a new school year. For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... Ticket resale is the act of reselling tickets for admission to events. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Buick LeSabre was a full-size car made by the Buick division of General Motors from 1959-2005. ... A: A cigarette rolling machine. ...


The sexually-curious Stacy initially hooks up with a much older home stereo salesman from an electronics retailer at the mall. He provides her first sexual experiences, but it is seen as less than pleasant in many respects. He immediately sleeps with her, and dumps her, and then Stacy seeks other relationships.


Stacy and nerdy Mark Ratner end up sharing a biology class. Eventually Mark asks Stacy out and receives pointers from his friend Mike the scalper. One of many romance tips is to play side one of Led Zeppelin IV, but we soon hear "Kashmir" from the band's 1975 double album Physical Graffiti as Mark and Stacy drive to a restaurant. (Due to a licensing snafu, the producers were unable to gain clearances to use songs from Led Zeppelin IV.) The date goes well despite Mark forgetting his wallet at home, and the tape deck being stolen from his sister's vehicle during their dinner. Then they go back to her house, she comes on to him in a major way, and he chickens out, leaving her there, with nothing but a robe on. He makes the excuse that he must get his sister's Ford Pinto back ASAP. The untitled fourth album of English rock band Led Zeppelin was released on November 8, 1971. ... This article is about the Led Zeppelin song. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Physical Graffiti is the sixth album, a double album by the English hard rock band Led Zeppelin. ...


Meanwhile, Spicoli drinks beer and smokes marijuana as he joyrides in a 1979 Chevrolet Camaro Z28 owned by Charles Jefferson (Whitaker), star of the football team. The car is a gift from a grateful alumnus, and Jefferson's little brother (also along for the ride) is concerned about its well-being. Of course, Spicoli manages to wreck the car — but promises, through the use of his father's tools as a TV repairman, that he can "fix it." The next day at school, a large crowd gathers around the front entrance where Jefferson's totaled car is covered in graffiti making it look as if the rival high school, Lincoln, destroyed it as a prank. Jefferson vents his anger out on the Lincoln football team that night, winning the game and sending Lincoln's quarterback out of the game on a stretcher. Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... The Chevrolet Camaro is a pony car made in North America by the Chevrolet Motor Division of General Motors. ...


Brad loses his cherished job at All American Burger in a dispute with an unsatisfied customer and is forced to take a new job at a Long John Silvers-styled fish restaurant. Employees are forced to wear a degrading pirate costume, and Brad soon quits this job in disgust. Categories: Food and drink stubs | Fast-food restaurants | PepsiCo subsidiaries ... Look up pirate and piracy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Spicoli manages to annoy Mr. Hand (Ray Walston), his American History teacher, in a series of amusing sketches. In the end, it appears that Mr. Hand won't allow Spicoli to advance to the next grade, but the teacher relents, telling the stoned surfer that he'll probably "squeak by." This is good enough for Spicoli, who, as we learn at the end of the movie, only needs "a cool buzz and some tasty waves" and he's fine. See World Wide Web for surfing the web; see also Wind surfing Surfing at Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. ...


Stacy is unhappy that Mark is taking so long to hop into bed with her, and winds up sleeping with his friend Mike after he walks her home from school. Soon, it is revealed that she is pregnant. Mike is unable to come up with half the money to pay for an abortion. She can't even get him to provide a ride to the clinic. In the end, her brother Brad takes her, and her friend Linda does her best to spread rumors that disparage Mike's manhood as revenge.


Mike and Mark get into a nasty fight over Stacy, and they stop talking. They ultimately meet up at a dance and become friends again though. Stacy gives a demure photo of herself to Mark and makes it clear that she'd like to begin seeing him again. Then we see Brad at his new job at a 7-Eleven-type store, Mi-T-Mart. A thief walks in the door with a pistol and tells Brad to give him the money in the safe. Spicoli distracts the thief just long enough for Brad to throw hot coffee in the robber's face and capture him, becoming a local hero.


During the end credits, we see what happens to the students in the future:

  • Brad becomes manager of the Mi-T-Mart.
  • Mike is busted for scalping Ozzy Osbourne tickets, and now works at 7-Eleven.
  • Linda goes to college in Riverside, California, and ends up living with her abnormal psychology professor.
  • Stacy and Mark are now a happy couple but they still haven't "gone all the way."
  • Mr. Hand is convinced all of his students are on dope.
  • Jeff Spicoli saves Brooke Shields from drowning and is given a sizable reward, which he blows hiring Van Halen to play at his birthday party.

Ozzy redirects here. ... For other uses, see 7-Eleven (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Location in the state of California Coordinates: , Country State County Riverside Government  - Mayor Ron Loveridge Area  - City  78. ... Abnormal psychology is the scientific study of abnormal behavior in order to describe, predict, explain, and change abnormal patterns of functioning. ... Brooke Christa Camille Shields[1] (born May 31, 1965) is an American actress and supermodel. ... This article is about the band Van Halen. ...

Additional scenes

There are several extra scenes not shown on the U.S. DVD version. Most of these scenes are shown on the cable versions. They include:

  1. Brad's friends warning Stacy about Mr. Hand before school starts.
  2. An extended scene with Stacy and Linda in the mall with a girl approaching Linda asking her about different ways of safe sex because she doesn't have protection.
  3. Brad throwing away an old batch of fries and is questioned by his boss.
  4. Stacy in the abortion clinic. She is shown lying on the table, and asking if this will be as painful as having the baby.
  5. Mike and Ratner talk about what to do on a date and Damone telling Rat to play Led Zeppelin IV. This scene is followed by a scene in which Linda and Stacy are talking on the phone and they are in their bra and panties. In this conversation Linda warns Stacy about the Led Zeppelin IV seduction technique.
  6. Brad talking with a guidance counselor about his life.
  7. Brad ripping down a Coca-Cola poster in his bedroom after getting fired.
  8. Mr. Hand signing students' yearbooks at the school dance.
  9. Extended dialog in the "no shirt, no shoes, no dice" scene, in which Spicoli says "I have uno nickel-ette ... and a pick" and makes up a story of how Mick Jagger gave him that pick.
  10. An extra scene of Linda comforting Stacy after she tells Linda that she might be pregnant after her tryst with Mike.
  11. Spicoli and two of his buddies are in the bathroom and Spicoli is telling an overly fantastic version of the incident, about how he told Mr. Hand not to mess with him or there would be trouble.
  12. Spicoli speech at the arcade, "life is like Pacman. You have to decimate or be decimated."

Sir Michael Phillip Mick Jagger (born July 26, 1943) is a English rock musician, actor, songwriter, record and film producer and businessman. ... Courtship (sometimes called dating or going steady) is the process of selecting and attracting a mate for marriage or sexual intercourse. ...

Cast

Sean Justin Penn (born August 17, 1960) // Penn was born in Santa Monica, California, the son of Leo Penn, an actor and director, and Eileen Ryan (née Annucci), an actress. ... Jennifer Jason Leigh (born February 5, 1962) is an American actress who has appeared in numerous films. ... Judge Reinhold is the stage name of Edward Ernest Reinhold, Jr. ... Robert Romanus (b. ... Brian Backer (b. ... Phoebe Cates (born on July 16, 1963) is an American film actress known for her roles in several teen films, most notably Fast Times at Ridgemont High and Gremlins. ... Ray Walston (December 2, 1914 – January 1, 2001) was a stage, television and feature film character actor who played the title character on the situation comedy My Favorite Martian and Judge Henry Bone on the drama series Picket Fences. ... Vincent Schiavelli and his then wife Allyce Beasley (September 20, 1987) Photo by Alan Light Vincent Andrew Schiavelli (November 10, 1948 – December 26, 2005) was an American character actor noted for his work in film and television. ... Lana Clarkson Lana Clarkson and Vincent Schiavelli from Fast Times at Ridgemont High Lana Clarkson (April 5, 1962 - February 3, 2003) was an American actress. ... Forest Steven Whitaker (born July 15, 1961) is an American actor, producer, and director. ... Eric H. Stoltz (born September 30, 1961) is a Golden Globe-nominated American actor. ... This article is about the American actor. ... James Vincent Russo (born April 23, 1953) is an American film and television actor. ... Nicolas Cage (born January 7, 1964) is an Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Ann (left) and Nancy Wilson, 1993 Nancy Wilson (born March 16, 1954) is an American singer and guitarist who, with her older sister Ann, became a part of the Seattle band Heart. ... Kelli Joan Maroney is an American actress who has starred in film and in television. ...

Soundtrack

Fast Times at Ridgemont High: Music from the Motion Picture
Fast Times at Ridgemont High: Music from the Motion Picture cover
Soundtrack by various artists
Released 1982
Genre Rock, Pop
Length 65:50
Label Elektra Records
Professional reviews

The soundtrack album, Fast Times at Ridgemont High: Music from the Motion Picture, was a hit, selling more than a million copies. It peaked at #54 on the Billboard album chart. Several songs were released as singles, including Jackson Browne's "Somebody's Baby", which reached #7 on the Billboard Top 40 pop singles chart.[2] Other singles were the title track by Sammy Hagar, "So Much in Love" by Timothy B. Schmit and "Waffle Stomp" by Joe Walsh. In addition to Schmit and Walsh, the album features solo tracks by two other members of the The Eagles, Don Henley and Don Felder. Image File history File links Fasttimesatridgemonthighsoundtrack. ... In film formats, the soundtrack is the physical area of the film which records the synchronized sound. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Pop music (disambiguation). ... In the music industry, a record label is a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... Elektra Records is an American record label owned by Warner Music Group, and today operates under Atlantic Records Group. ... The All Music Guide (AMG) is a metadata database about music, owned by All Media Guide. ... Image File history File links 4_stars. ... It has been suggested that Billboard be merged into this article or section. ... Clyde Jackson Browne (born October 9, 1948) is an American rock music singer, songwriter, guitarist, and pianist, whose introspective lyrics made him the poster boy of the Southern California confessional singer-songwriter movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... Billboard is a weekly American magazine devoted to the music industry. ... Top 40 is a radio format based on frequent repetition of songs from a constantly-updated list of the forty best-selling singles. ... Samuel Roy Hagar (born October 13, 1947 in Monterey, California, USA), better known as Sammy Hagar (aka The Red Rocker), is an American rock guitarist, singer, and composer. ... Timothy Bruce Schmit (born October 30, 1947, in Oakland, California) is an American bass guitar player and singer best known as a member of Poco and the Eagles. ... For other persons named Joe Walsh, see Joe Walsh (disambiguation). ... The Eagles redirects here. ... Donald Hugh Don Henley (born July 22, 1947 in Gilmer, Texas) is an American rock musician who is the drummer and one of the lead singers and songwriters of the band Eagles. ... Donald William[1] Felder (born September 21, 1947 in Gainesville, Florida) is an American rock musician who was a member of the Eagles from 1974-1980 and from 1994-2001. ...


Amy Heckerling, in the DVD audio commentary, states that the '70s "classic rock" artists like the Eagles were the idea of one of the film's producers. Though she does not mention him by name, that was clearly Irving Azoff, who in addition to producing the film was also a rock artist manager; having managed the Eagles during the '70s and, by 1982, continuing to manage the now broken-up band members' solo careers, Azoff had a vested interest in loading the hit soundtrack with songs that would generate money for his clients (there is even a cover version of the Eagles' 1977 hit "Life in the Fast Lane" played, somewhat incongruously, by the film's cover band in the high-school dance scene). For her part, Heckerling was more interested in the L.A. New Wave sounds of Oingo Boingo and the Go-Go's, which she felt were more popular among kids of that era. Irving Azoff is a famous music industry manager of bands such as Jewel, The Eagles, Bush, REO Speedwagon, Dan Fogelberg, Seal, Journey, Christina Aguilera, Van Halen and Steely Dan. ... Life in the Fast Lane is a song written by Joe Walsh, Glenn Frey and Don Henley and recorded by the American rock band Eagles for their 1977 album Hotel California. ... New Wave was a pop and rock music genre that existed during the late 1970s and the early-to-mid 1980s. ... For other uses, see Oingo Boingo (disambiguation). ... The Go-Gos classic line-up, (L-R): Charlotte Caffey, Gina Shock, Belinda Carlisle, Kathy Valentine, Jane Wiedlin. ...


Among the songs in the film that do not appear on the album include The Cars' "Moving in Stereo", Tom Petty's "American Girl", and a piano version of "Strangers in the Night" which plays in the background at the German restaurant. The Cars were an American rock band, fronted by Ric Ocasek, that emerged from the early punk scene in the late 1970s. ... Moving in Stereo is a song from The Cars on their self-titled debut album. ... American Girl is the title of a 1977 single released by Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers from their breakthrough self-titled album. ... Strangers in the Night is a song made famous by Frank Sinatra, who recorded it in 1966. ...


Another song not on the album is "Kashmir" by Led Zeppelin, a band that is highly selective in licensing its songs for use in films. Crowe was later able to use several Zeppelin tracks in Almost Famous, including "The Rain Song" and "That's the Way." This article is about the Led Zeppelin song. ... Almost Famous is a 2000 American film written and directed by Cameron Crowe. ... The Rain Song is a song from English rock band Led Zeppelins fifth album Houses of the Holy, released in 1973. ... Thats the Way is a song by English rock band Led Zeppelin from their third album, Led Zeppelin III, released in 1970. ...


Also missing from the soundtrack are the Cinch songs from the graduation dance at the end of the film, "Life in the Fast Lane" and "Wooly Bully". Sam the Sham is the stage name of rock n roll singer Domingo “Sam” Samudio from Dallas, Texas. ...


Track listing

  1. "Somebody's Baby" (Jackson Browne) - 4:05
  2. "Waffle Stomp" (Joe Walsh) - 3:40
  3. "Love Rules" (Don Henley) - 4:05
  4. "Uptown Boys" (Louise Goffin) - 2:45
  5. "So Much in Love" (Timothy B. Schmit) - 2:25
  6. "Raised on the Radio" (The Ravyns) - 3:43
  7. "The Look in Your Eyes" (Gerard McMahon) - 4:00
  8. "We Got the Beat" (Go-Go's) - 2:11
  9. "Don't Be Lonely" (Quarterflash) - 3:18
  10. "Never Surrender" (Don Felder) - 4:15
  11. "Fast Times (The Best Years of Our Lives)" (Billy Squier) - 3:41
  12. "Fast Times at Ridgemont High" (Sammy Hagar) - 3:36
  13. "I Don't Know (Spicoli's Theme)" (Jimmy Buffett) - 3:00
  14. "Love Is the Reason" (Graham Nash) - 3:31
  15. "I'll Leave It up to You" (Poco) - 2:55
  16. "Highway Runner" (Donna Summer) - 3:18
    • Was to be featured on Summer's album, I'm a Rainbow, but was shelved by her record label at the time. Its appearance on this soundtrack was an exclusive for Summer fans.
  17. "Sleeping Angel" (Stevie Nicks) - 3:55
  18. "She's My Baby (And She's Outta Control)" (Jost Palmer) - 2:53
  19. "Goodbye, Goodbye" (Oingo Boingo) - 4:34
  20. "Everybody's Girl" (Rick Springfield)

Somebodys Baby is a 1982 song written and performed by Jackson Browne. ... Clyde Jackson Browne (born October 9, 1948) is an American rock music singer, songwriter, guitarist, and pianist, whose introspective lyrics made him the poster boy of the Southern California confessional singer-songwriter movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... For other persons named Joe Walsh, see Joe Walsh (disambiguation). ... Donald Hugh Don Henley (born July 22, 1947 in Gilmer, Texas) is an American rock musician who is the drummer and one of the lead singers and songwriters of the band Eagles. ... Louise Goffin is a singer who debuted on Dreamworks in 2003 with her CD Sometimes a Circle. ... Timothy Bruce Schmit (born October 30, 1947, in Oakland, California) is an American bass guitar player and singer best known as a member of Poco and the Eagles. ... We Got the Beat is a song recorded by the American rock band The Go-Gos. ... The Go-Gos classic line-up, (L-R): Charlotte Caffey, Gina Shock, Belinda Carlisle, Kathy Valentine, Jane Wiedlin. ... Quarterflash is a pop-rock group formed in Portland, Orgon in 1980. ... Donald William[1] Felder (born September 21, 1947 in Gainesville, Florida) is an American rock musician who was a member of the Eagles from 1974-1980 and from 1994-2001. ... Billy Squier (born May 12, 1950, in Wellesley, Massachusetts, USA) is a rock musician. ... Samuel Roy Hagar (born October 13, 1947 in Monterey, California, USA), better known as Sammy Hagar (aka The Red Rocker), is an American rock guitarist, singer, and composer. ... James William Jimmy Buffett (born December 25, 1946) is a singer, songwriter, author, businessman, and recently a film producer best known for his island escapism lifestyle and music including hits such as Margaritaville (No. ... Graham Nash on cover of his recording, Wild Tales, 1973 Graham William Nash (born February 2, 1942) is an English-born singer-songwriter known for his light tenor vocals and songwriting contributions in pop group The Hollies and folk-rock band Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, and as a photography collector... Poco is an American country rock band. ... Donna Summer (born LaDonna Adrian Gaines, on December 31, 1948) is a legendary American singer, songwriter, and artist, best known for a string of dance hits in the 1970s that earned her the title Queen of Disco and as one of the few disco-based artists to have longevity on... Im a Rainbow is a double album recorded by Donna Summer in 1981 that remained unreleased until 1996. ... Stephanie Lynn Stevie Nicks (born May 26, 1948) is an American singer and songwriter, best known for her work with Fleetwood Mac and a long solo career, which collectively have produced over twenty Top 350 hits. ... For other uses, see Oingo Boingo (disambiguation). ... Rick Springfield (born Richard Lewis Springthorpe on August 23, 1949 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia) is a songwriter, musician and actor. ...

Origins and production

The film is adapted from a book Crowe wrote after a year spent at Clairemont High School in San Diego, California. He went undercover to do research for his 1981 book Fast Times at Ridgemont High: A True Story, about his observations of the high school and the students he befriended there.[1] In San Diego, there is a popular myth that the high school he was writing about during the book was a combination of Clairemont High and University of San Diego High. Clairemont High School is a high school (Grades 9-12) located in the Clairemont neighborhood of San Diego, California belonging to the San Diego Unified School District. ... San Diego redirects here. ...


Heckerling shepherded the young cast, which included Nicolas Cage in his first feature-film role. He was credited as Nicolas Coppola for the first and only time. It was also the film debut for Eric Stoltz and provided early roles for Anthony Edwards and Forest Whitaker. Crowe's girlfriend at the time, and later, wife, Nancy Wilson of Heart, has a cameo as "Beautiful girl in Corvette". Eric H. Stoltz (born September 30, 1961) is a Golden Globe-nominated American actor. ... This article is about the American actor. ... Forest Steven Whitaker (born July 15, 1961) is an American actor, producer, and director. ... Ann (left) and Nancy Wilson, 1993 Nancy Wilson (born March 16, 1954) is an American singer and guitarist who, with her older sister Ann, became a part of the Seattle band Heart. ... For other uses, see Heart (disambiguation). ...


Filming locations

Fast Times was filmed in the San Fernando Valley of Los Angeles (although it is never explicitly mentioned as such in the film), and many people identify the movie with that area and the teen culture that existed there, or was perceived to exist there, in the early 1980s. "Ridgemont" is a fictional name; there is no California community by that name. Crowe likely named it after Clairemont High School in San Diego. Most of the exteriors of Ridgemont High School were shot at Van Nuys High School, and other scenes were shot at Canoga Park High School. The "Ridgemont Mall" shown in the film was actually the Sherman Oaks Galleria, with its exterior shot at Santa Monica Place. The actual mall has since been converted to an open-air mall. "The Point" was filmed at the Encino Little League Field in Encino. San Fernando Valley from its southwestern edge. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... Clairemont High School is a high school (Grades 9-12) located in the Clairemont neighborhood of San Diego, California belonging to the San Diego Unified School District. ... Flag Seal Nickname: Americas Finest City Location Location of San Diego within San Diego County Coordinates , Government County San Diego Mayor City Attorney         City Council District One District Two District Three District Four District Five District Six District Seven District Eight Jerry Sanders (R) Michael Aguirre Scott Peters Kevin... Van Nuys High School Van Nuys High School (VNHS) established in 1914, is a high school in the Van Nuys area of Los Angeles, California, belonging to the Los Angeles Unified School District: District 2. ... Canoga Park High School is a public school located in Canoga Park in the San Fernando Valley of Los Angeles, California, USA, within the Los Angeles Unified School District. ... Sherman Oaks Galleria is a shopping mall and business center located in the Sherman Oaks neighborhood of Los Angeles, California at the corner of Ventura and Sepulveda Boulevards in the San Fernando Valley. ... Santa Monica Place is a three-story, 570,000 square-foot shopping mall in Santa Monica, California. ... Encino is a neighborhood of the City of Los Angeles, California located in the San Fernando Valley. ...


Reception

Box office

Universal Pictures gave it a limited theatrical release on August 13, 1982, opening in 498 theaters. It earned $2.5 million in its opening weekend. The release was later widened to 713 theaters, earning $3.25 million and ranking 29th among US releases in 1982. The movie has since earned more than $27 million,[3] six times its $4.5 million budget, gaining popularity through television showings and home video releases, leading to somewhat of a cult following. Universal Pictures is the main motion picture production/distribution arm of Universal Studios, a subsidiary of NBC Universal. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ...


Criticism

The film has an 82% rating on Rotten Tomatoes.[4] However, it was panned by critics at the time. Roger Ebert called it a "scuz-pit of a movie", though he praised the performances by Leigh, Penn, Cates and Reinhold.[5] Janet Maslin wrote that it was "a jumbled but appealing teen-age comedy with something of a fresh perspective on the subject."[6] This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ... Janet Maslin is a book critic for the daily New York Times. ...


Nominations, listings

Crowe's screenplay was nominated for a WGA Award for best comedy adapted from another medium. The film was added in 2005 to the list of films preserved in the United States National Film Registry. The film ranks #87 on the AFI's 100 Years... 100 Laughs list, is #15 on Bravo's "100 Funniest Movies"[7] and is #2 on Entertainment Weekly's list of the "50 Best High School Movies".[8] The Writers Guild of America (WGA) is the collective bargaining representative, or labor union, for writers in the motion picture and television industries in the United States. ... This is a list of film-related events in 2005. ... The United States National Film Registry is the registry of films selected by the National Film Preservation Board for preservation in the Library of Congress. ... The National Film Registry is the registry of films selected by the United States National Film Preservation Board for preservation in the Library of Congress. ... The 100 funniest American films. ... This article is about the U.S. cable network. ... Entertainment Weekly (sometimes abbreviated EW) is a magazine published by Time Inc. ...


TV spinoff

The movie inspired a short-lived 1986 television series called Fast Times. Ray Walston and Vincent Schiavelli reprised their roles, respectively as Mr. Hand and Mr. Vargas, the biology teacher. Other cast members were Courtney Thorne-Smith as Stacey, Wally Ward as Mark, Claudia Wells as Linda, Patrick Dempsey as Mike, Dean Cameron as Spicoli and James Nardini as Brad. Fast Times Fast Times is a seven-episode 1986 television sequel to the 1982 movie Fast Times at Ridgemont High that was produced by Amy Heckerling, who directed the original film. ... Ray Walston (December 2, 1914 – January 1, 2001) was a stage, television and feature film character actor who played the title character on the situation comedy My Favorite Martian and Judge Henry Bone on the drama series Picket Fences. ... Vincent Schiavelli and his then wife Allyce Beasley (September 20, 1987) Photo by Alan Light Vincent Andrew Schiavelli (November 10, 1948 – December 26, 2005) was an American character actor noted for his work in film and television. ... Courtney Thorne-Smith Courtney Thorne-Smith (born November 8, 1967) is an American actress. ... {Infobox Actor} | name = Wallace Langham | image = | caption = | birthdate = {{birth date and age|1965|03|11 | location = Fort Worth, Teaxas, United States | birthname = Wallace Langham | height = 5 feet 10 inches (1. ... Claudia Wells (born July 5, 1966) is an American actress. ... Patrick Galen Dempsey (born January 13, 1966) is a Golden Globe Award-nominated American actor who first became prominent in Hollywood during the late 1980s. ... Dean Cameron (born Dean Eikleberry on December 25, 1962, in Morrison, Illinois, USA) is an American television and film actor. ...


Moon Unit Zappa provided "teenage consultation" for this TV series. She was hired in order to research slang terms and mannerisms of teenagers, as she had just graduated high school at the time and had a much better grasp of then-current high school behavior than the writers. Moon Unit Zappa (born September 28, 1967, in New York City) is the oldest child of late American rock star Frank Zappa and Gail Sloatman; she goes by the name Moon Zappa. ...


Pop culture references

  • The fantasy sequence involving Cates removing her red bikini top has been parodied several times. Jimmy Kimmel played the part of Cates to Adam Carolla's Brad on The Man Show. It was also re-enacted in the movie, Kids in America (2005) in a sequence in which the teenage couple, Holden Donovan (Gregory Smith) and Charlotte Pratt (Stephanie Sherrin) attempt to recreate a number of ‘Greatest On-screen Kisses’. Fountains of Wayne paid tribute by casting Rachel Hunter in the Cates role for the video of their single "Stacy's Mom". Pop-punk band Fenix*TX performs a song called "Phoebe Cates" with the lyrics: "I've been in love since the day I saw 'Fast Times,'/It's on a permanent rewind and can you guess my favorite part?" According to the DVD extras, many video store owners reported that VHS copies of the film had tracking errors during Cates's famous scene. The sequence ranked No. 1 on a list of the top 100 nude scenes compiled by Mrskin.com. The scene is also parodied in the season 2 episode of Alias called Double Agent. The bikini sequence was also referenced in National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation when Clark W. Griswold is daydreaming out of the window about his soon-to-be-installed swimming pool.
  • An episode of the animated comedy TV series Family Guy was loosely based on the film, including a Mr. Vargas character and a parody of the Phoebe Cates sequence with Tom Tucker diving in the pool and then taking off his suit and kissing Meg. Also, in "Let's Go to the Hop", Peter sneaks out of his bedroom in the same manner (and to the same music) as Stacy did when going on her date with Ron. A later episode was named "Fast Times at Buddy Cianci Jr. High", a parody of the movie's title. Still another episode featuries a cut to Spicoli after an outrageous action by Mort Goldman, saying "Awesome, Totally awesome! Alright, Goldman!" a slightly altered version of the film's last line.
  • In the sitcom Scrubs, series protagonist JD has a fantasy about an attractive nurse walking down the hall in a way similar to that of the bikini scene.
  • At the conclusion of the fourth episode of Clerks: The Animated Series, there is a scene where Judge Reinhold throws coffee in a robber's face, and is threatened with a lawsuit - a parody of the film's ending. Also referenced in Clerks II is "Train Wreck!" - making-of video "The 80's Ending."

A dream sequence is a technique used in storytelling, particularly in television and film, to set apart a brief interlude from the main story. ... This article is about the womens bathing suit. ... James Christian Jimmy Kimmel (born November 13, 1967) is an American comedian, writer, talk show host, game show host, and producer. ... Adam Carolla (born May 27, 1964) is an American comedian, comedy writer, radio personality, television personality and actor. ... The Man Show was a half hour comedy television show on Comedy Central. ... Kids in America is a 1981 song performed by Kim Wilde. ... Gregory Edward Smith (born July 6, 1983) is a Canadian/American actor. ... Fountains of Wayne is an American power pop/rock band, formed in 1995. ... Rachel Hunter (born September 9, 1969 in Auckland, New Zealand) is a fashion model, actress and reality TV show host. ... Stacys Mom is a hit single by American band Fountains of Wayne, released in 2003 and taken from their album Welcome Interstate Managers. ... Pop punk (also known as punk pop and other names) is a fusion genre that combines elements of punk rock with pop music, to varying degrees. ... Fenix*TX is an American four-piece pop punk band. ... Bottom view of VHS cassette with magnetic tape exposed Top view of VHS cassette with front casing removed The Video Home System, better known by its abbreviation VHS, is a recording and playing standard. ... Alias is an American Spy-fi television series created by J. J. Abrams which was broadcast on ABC from September 30, 2001 to May 22, 2006, spanning five seasons. ... This article contains episode summaries as well as directing and writing credits from Season 2 of the American drama/adventure television series Alias. ... National Lampoons Christmas Vacation (1989, Warner Bros. ... Clark Wilhelm Griswold, Jr. ... Vernor Steffen Vinge (IPA: ) (born February 10, 1944) is a mathematician, computer scientist and science fiction author who is best known for his Hugo award-winning novels A Fire Upon the Deep and A Deepness in the Sky, as well as for his 1993 essay The Technological Singularity, in which... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... The Collected Stories of Vernor Vinge is a collection of science fiction short stories by Vernor Vinge. ... Animation refers to the process in which each frame of a film or movie is produced individually, whether generated as a computer graphic, or by photographing a drawn image, or by repeatedly making small changes to a model (see claymation and stop motion), and then photographing the result. ... Family Guy is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series about a dysfunctional family in the fictional town of Quahog, Rhode Island. ... Quahog 5 is the local television station the FOX network TV show Family Guy. ... Megan Ryan Meg Griffin is a cartoon character on the TV show Family Guy by Seth MacFarlane. ... “Let’s Go to the Hop” is an episode from the second season of the FOX animated television series Family Guy. ... Fast Times at Buddy Cianci Jr. ... Scrubs is an Emmy- and Peabody Award-winning American situation comedy/comedy-drama that premiered on October 2, 2001 on NBC. It was created by Bill Lawrence and is produced by Touchstone Television. ... John Dorian (portrayed by Zach Braff) Dr. Jonathan Michael Dorian (most commonly referred to as J.D.) is a fictional character played by Zach Braff in the American sitcom Scrubs. ... Clerks II is the sequel to Kevin Smiths 1994 movie Clerks, and his sixth feature film to be set in the View Askewniverse. ... Animation refers to the process in which each frame of a film or movie is produced individually, whether generated as a computer graphic, or by photographing a drawn image, or by repeatedly making small changes to a model (see claymation and stop motion), and then photographing the result. ... The Venture Bros. ... This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long. ... This article is about the syndrome. ... James Newell Osterberg, Jr. ... David Bowie (IPA: []) (born David Robert Jones on 1947 January 8) is an English singer, songwriter, actor, multi-instrumentalist, producer, arranger and audio engineer. ... “The Monarch” redirects here. ... End Is Forever is the third full release on Kung-Fu Records by The Ataris in 2001. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Trivia

  • Near the beginning of the movie, right after Mr. Hand sends Spicoli to the front office for being late to class, he passes out the class schedule of quizzes. After the paper is passed out, the students put the page up to their noses and deeply inhale. This was a popular school ritual of the '60s, '70s and early '80s as photocopying machines were very expensive, so spirit duplicators, more commonly referred to as "ditto machines," were used. The spirit duplicators used a colored wax as the "ink" and an alcohol-based solvent as a transfer agent to impress the ink on the paper. These solvents sometimes took a long time to dry, hence the students' use of these solvents as a short-term "high".
  • In each scene which takes place in Mr. Hand's history class, he is attempting to teach the students about the Platt Amendment.

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A spirit duplicator (also referred to as a Ditto machine or Banda machine) was a low-volume printing method used mainly by schools and churches. ... Page one of the Platt Amendment The Platt Amendment was a rider amended to the Army Appropriations Act, a United States federal law passed on March 2, 1901 that stipulated the conditions for the withdrawal of United States troops remaining in Cuba since the Spanish-American War, and defined the...

References

  • Fast Times at Ridgemont High DVD commentary

Notes

  1. ^ Fast Times at Ridgemont High at the Internet Movie Cars Database, IMDCB.org
  2. ^ Charts and Awards, All Music Guide.
  3. ^ Fast Times at Ridgemont High at Box Office Mojo (retrieved on December 6, 2006).
  4. ^ Fast Times at Ridgemont High at Rotten Tomatoes (retrieved on December 6, 1982).
  5. ^ Ebert, Roger. 1982. Fast Times at Ridgemont High, Chicago Sun-Times (retrieved on December 6, 2006).
  6. ^ Maslin, Janet. September 3, 1982. "Ridgemont High", New York Times (retrieved via registered-user account on December 6, 2006).
  7. ^ "Bravo's 100 Funniest Movies List is Laughable", Manroomonline.com, June 2, 2006.
  8. ^ 50 Best High School Movies, Entertainment Weekly.

Box Office Mojo is a website that tracks box office revenue in a systematic way. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ... Janet Maslin is a book critic for the daily New York Times. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

  Results from FactBites:
 
HD DVD Review: Fast Times at Ridgemont High | High-Def Digest (1584 words)
No, nothing that happens in 'Fast Times' is, in hindsight, all that dramatic, but then that's the beauty of high school -- at the time a pimple seems of monumental importance.
All 'Fast Times' does is observe the mundane realities of being a teenager with great sensitivity and humor, which is why it remains so universal and resonant.
As you 'Fast Times' scholars know, Crowe was originally hired to write an article on the state of the American high schooler, circa 1980, for Rolling Stone magazine.
Fast Times at Ridgemont High - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1031 words)
Fast Times at Ridgemont High is a 1982 American teen film directed by Amy Heckerling and written by Cameron Crowe (who wrote both the screenplay and a book of the same name which inspired the movie).
Fast Times was filmed in the San Fernando Valley of Los Angeles (although it is never explicitly mentioned as such in the film), and many people identify the movie with that area and the teen culture that existed there, or was perceived to exist there, in the early 1980s.
Fast Times is one of two Cameron Crowe films that feature a song by Led Zeppelin; the other is Almost Famous.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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